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Carlos Batara
Immigration Attorney, Blogger, Educator, Public Speaker, Community Organizer, And Non-Profit Consultant.
Immigration Attorney, Blogger, Educator, Public Speaker, Community Organizer, And Non-Profit Consultant.
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In a 5-2 decision, the Wisconsin Supreme Court has ruled (5-2) that a defendant cannot withdraw his guilty plea even though the trial court did not fully comply with the state statute that requires judges to advise defendants about immigration consequences.
 
 
https://www.wisbar.org/NewsPublications/Pages/General-Article.aspx?ArticleID=26083&utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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All good things must end.  At least when it comes to immigration in the Age of Trump.
 
This change, in actuality, was a no-brainer.  The only real question was why this change took so long.
 
 
https://www.scoop.it/t/riverside-immigration-attorney-news/p/4091049950/2017/12/18/visa-waiver-entry-requirements-tightened?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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The reality is this.  Unless the immigration reform unites around family unity, the rights of legalized family members may be fundamentally destroyed. 
 

 
That’s what all the xenophobic jibber about “chain migration” means.
 
Instead of focusing the vast majority of political outcries on small pieces of the immigration pie, pro-reform advocates need to bring the debate back to the “bedrock of immigration law”: bringing and keeping families together.
 
As I discussed at the time of the 50th birthday of the 1965 Immigration And Nationality Act - the basic law under which we operate today, the “chain migration” argument is hardly new. 
 

http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-white-house-to-push-merit-based-immigration-in-new-campaign-2017-12?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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It's never too late to become a U.S. citizen. Nearly 88 Years Old, Maria Ramirez Perez Is Sworn In As U.S. Citizen.
 
I tell all my clients and prospective clients - and, in fact, any immigrant or permanent resident who takes the time to listen to me.
 
Take Maria Ramirez Perez.  On Christmas Day in 1929, she was born in a small, poverty-stricken town in rural Mexico.
 
Throughout my career, I've been fortunate to help a good number of immigrants naturalize who were in their 50s and 60s, and a few in their 70s.  Their success is not just a reward to them.  It's also a reward for me. 
 
But I have not had the opportunity to help any become citizens in their 80s.  If Ms. Ramirez had an attorney, I congratulate them as well.  
 
On Christmas Day, 1929, Maria Ramirez Perez was born in a small, poverty-stricken town in rural Mexico. A few days ago, on December 11, 2017, she was sworn in as a U.S. citizen at the of age of 88. (And she plans to vote against Trump in the next election. Okay, okay. I made the last part up.)
https://www.scoop.it/t/naturalization-and-citizenship/p/4090934296/2017/12/15/it-s-never-too-late-nearly-88-years-old-maria-ramirez-perez-is-sworn-in-as-u-s-citizen?utm_medium=social&utm_source=googleplus
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