Profile

Cover photo
Kenneth Tanner
Works at Holy Redeemer
Lives in Rochester Hills
11,239 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
God is the great janitor, kneeling on the floor of the universe, towel in hand, ready to do the menial work.
1
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
1
1
David Flowers's profile photo
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
The defenders of the classical idea of God don’t like the vulnerability of Jesus. His handling of sinners, his descent to the dead, his exposure to our fallen nature are not suitable to his divine origin. How can God bleed, dine with–touch?–the unclean, cloth himself in sin-tainted flesh (without sin), fellowship with the dead, love the Samaritan?

The particularity of Jesus is resisted by those who desire a malleable, unknowable God: Jesus is a Jew; he’s a first century male living in what the Romans came to call Palestine; he was formed by the Torah and the Psalter; it was his weekly custom to worship in a synagogue. He transcends these specifics but he cannot then or now be divorced from them.

He bows neither to our identity politics nor our xenophobia. His divinity does not require the metaphysical safety nets of classical Greek theology and all the specificity of Jesus enhances–never diminishes–his transcendence.

More on Patheos:
1
Kenneth Tanner's profile photoMatthew Faraday's profile photo
12 comments
 
And there is the heart of the question, my friend. 
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
Holy Saturday is where the world lives now, awaiting resurrection. There is darkness that remains despite all Easters. Christians need to be honest about this reality even as we boldly confess and proclaim the reality of the Resurrection.

Those who follow Christ don’t live in denial, certainly not about the pain and tragedy of existence.

Miscarriages of children. Miscarriages of justice. Senseless killings. In Kenya, this Holy Week, 147 young Christian men and women gunned down in the prime of their lives by fanatics. Broken bones that don’t heal right. Marriages that are on life support. Cancer. Parkinson’s. MS. Lost homes. Lost jobs. Lost children. Wars that claim our loved ones.

When we live in denial about these and other real life struggles—and denial can be simply tuning out the darkness with false enthusiasm—it’s hard for the world to receive our very good news that all of this death is not the end; that the death of Jesus means that death is now everywhere in retreat, even if we cannot always see that.

It’s also harder for us to engage suffering strangers and acquaintances with authentic compassion, mercy, and empathy when we refuse to stay with Jesus at the crosses or tombs of life. It’s hard to be patient in our own sufferings, or endure the anguish of those closest to us—to see them as a participation in Christ’s hardships—when we expect every day to be Easter.

When we live in denial, it’s hard to sustain honest community, to engender churches where folks who doubt and struggle with faith and obedience are as welcome as those who are certain and assured; where those who labor in the heat all day are glad for the companionship of those who show up for work at the last minute.

It’s hard to keep it real when you are living Easter in denial; in denial that others—others in the pew next to yours—are living Holy Saturday or even—Christ, have mercy—gutting it out through a personal Good Friday. More of my Easter sermon is now out on Patheos:
1
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
3
1
Kenneth Tanner's profile photoAndrew Culver's profile photoStormie M.'s profile photo
2 comments
 
Love It :-)
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
Telling and living the story of our salvation as a cross without an incarnation, as many contemporary Americans also sometimes do, is to forget that God so loves humanity that he becomes one of us–identifies himself forever with those he made in his image–in a startling, infinitely personal ratification of his work in forming us from the dust.

God is now “bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh.” The poor are made rich because God weds himself to our weakness. The “seed of the woman” comes to crush the head of the serpent.

By the incarnation, the cross is grounded in–and interpreted by–both the radical “yes” of Mary and the radical “yes” of God. There is a sacred cooperation between God and humanity here–a renewal of covenant relationship–that begins at the annunciation and is made more sure by everything that follows.

Read more: 
1
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
Jesus troubles settled belief and settled unbelief.
1
Harry Chamberlain's profile photoKenneth Tanner's profile photo
2 comments
 
Amen
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
If a Christian ministry manipulates emotions or coerces obedience, if it promotes or induces fear, anger, hatred or anxiety, it does not reflect or represent the ministry of Jesus Christ.
3
Add a comment...

Kenneth Tanner

Shared publicly  - 
 
Jesus gets to encounter a lot of folks in their need or even curiosity or just plain doubt and anger when I make myself visible by wearing clerics; when I wear my uniform. Otherwise, I blend right in and no one knows that Christ is in their midst, unless perhaps my bible or prayer book are in front of me.
1
Matthew Faraday's profile photoKenneth Tanner's profile photo
4 comments
 
👍
Add a comment...
People
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Rochester Hills
Links
Work
Employment
  • Holy Redeemer
    Pastor, 2005 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Male