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Chris Farrell
144 followers -
Software Developer, boardgamer, and amateur clarinetist
Software Developer, boardgamer, and amateur clarinetist

144 followers
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Just a reminder, if you want to get my quick-takes on games and see what I've been playing, the place to find me these days is in Instagram (where I am cfarrell317) or Tumblr (where I am illuminatinggames).
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This serious structural analysis of the Star Wars movies will totally blow your mind.
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Droids, Midichlorians, and Orcs: Dealing with problematic canon

If you run an RPG, whether it’s a licensed property or not, there are bound to be elements of the canon that you don’t like or disagree with. In general, my recommendation is to suck it up and stick to the canon, if for no other reason than just not to…

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Droids, Midichlorians, and Orcs: Dealing with problematic canon

If you run an RPG, whether it’s a licensed property or not, there are bound to be elements of the canon that you don’t like or disagree with. In general, my recommendation is to suck it up and stick to the canon, if for no other reason than just not to…
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I dig into the Star Wars: Age of Rebellion RPG's dice pool, and try to figure out if the probabilities make sense.

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I dig into the Star Wars: Age of Rebellion RPG's dice pool, and try to figure out if the probabilities make sense.
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I ask the question of how player agency works in boardgames: like reading? like playing an RPG? What games do it best?

Last week there was an interesting interview on Slate’s The Gist with Peter Mendelsund, an ex-concert pianist and current designer of book covers. The conversation turned to how much agency the audience/reader/player has when engaging with different types…
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Moby Dick or, The Card Game; my view on compressing a monster book into a small game:

Back in 2005 Reiner Knizia and Kosmos published Beowulf: The Legend, which was a turning point for me in my appreciation of what games can aspire to do. The game represented a legitimate artistic interpretation of the source material (as did Knizia’s…
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