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Jeffrey Lapin
61,845 followers -
Attorney- Owner of Lapin Law Offices - Personal Injury Lawyer - Workers' Compensation Lawyer - Disability Lawyer
Attorney- Owner of Lapin Law Offices - Personal Injury Lawyer - Workers' Compensation Lawyer - Disability Lawyer

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Orion in twilight


Great Basin National Park is an American national park located in White Pine County in east-central Nevada, near the Utah border, established in 1986.
https://www.nps.gov/grba/index.htm

Credit: Jeremy Stanley
Location: Nevada, United States
Image Date: September 8, 2018

+Commission for Dark Skies

#Earth #Astronomy #Space #Science #Stars #Orion #Twilight #Photography #Astrophotography #GreatBasin #NationalPark #Nevada #UnitedStates #DarkSkies #LightPollution #STEM #Education
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This is a Coma Cluster—a structure of over a thousand galaxies bound together by gravity. Many of these galaxies are elliptical types, but the outskirts of the cluster also host younger spiral galaxies that proudly display their swirling arms. Check out this Hubble Space Telescope view: https://go.nasa.gov/2NyI80T
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Stars and Dust in Corona Australis
Image Credit & Copyright: Josep Drudis
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180920.html

Cosmic dust clouds and young, energetic stars inhabit this telescopic vista, less than 500 light-years away toward the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. The dust clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in the Milky Way. But the striking complex of reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, and IC 4812 produce a characteristic color as blue light from the region's young, hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The dust also obscures from view stars still in the process of formation. At top right, smaller yellowish nebula NGC 6729 bends around young variable star R Coronae Australis. Near it, glowing arcs and loops shocked by outflows from embedded newborn stars are identified as Herbig-Haro objects. On the sky this field of view spans about 1 degree. That corresponds to almost 9 light-years at the estimated distance of the nearby star forming region.
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Our Hubble Space Telescope detected an unusual infrared light radiating from a nearby neutron star, which forms when a massive star runs out of fuel and collapses. But could these be new features never before seen? Find out the possibilities: https://go.nasa.gov/2QDPyhe
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Ice Halos at Yellowknife
Image Credit & Copyright: Stephen Bedingfield
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180914.html

You've probably seen a circle around the Sun before. More common than rainbows, ice halos, like a 22 degree circular halo for example, can be easy to spot, especially if you can shade your eyes from direct sunlight. Still it's rare to see such a diverse range of ice halos, including sundogs, tangent, infralateral, and Parry arcs, all found in this snapshot from planet Earth. The picture was quickly taken in the late morning of September 4 from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada. The beautiful patterns are generated as sunlight (or moonlight) is reflected and refracted in six-sided water ice crystals in Earth's atmosphere. Of course, atmospheric ice halos in the skies of other worlds are likely to be different.
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Awesome Galactic Gravity | Hubble
Gravity is so much a part of our daily lives that it is all too easy to forget its awesome power—but on a galactic scale, its power becomes both strikingly clear and visually stunning.

This image was taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and shows an object named SDSS J1138+2754. It acts as a gravitational lens illustrates the true strength of gravity: A large mass—a galaxy cluster in this case—is creating such a strong gravitational field that it is bending the very fabric of its surroundings. This causes the billion-year-old light from galaxies sitting behind it to travel along distorted, curved paths, transforming the familiar shapes of spirals and ellipticals (visible in other parts of the image) into long, smudged arcs and scattered dashes.

Some distant galaxies even appear multiple times in this image. Since galaxies are wide objects, light from one side of the galaxy passes through the gravitational lens differently than light from the other side. When the galaxies’ light reaches Earth it can appear reflected, as seen with the galaxy on the lower left part of the lens, or distorted, as seen with the galaxy to the upper right.

This data were taken as part of a research project on star formation in the distant Universe, building on Hubble’s extensive legacy of deep-field images. Hubble observed 73 gravitationally-lensed galaxies for this project.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
Release Date: September 10, 2018

+Hubble Space Telescope
+NASA Goddard
+European Space Agency, ESA
+Space Telescope Science Institute

#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Science #SDSSJ11382754 #GravitationalLens #Gravity #Galaxy #Cluster #Telescope #Cosmos #Universe #ESA #Goddard #GSFC #STEM #Education
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M1: The Crab Nebula from Hubble
Image Credit: +NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA, Hubble, J. Hester, A. Loll (ASU)
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180909.html

This is the mess that is left when a star explodes. The Crab Nebula, the result of a supernova seen in 1054 AD, is filled with mysterious filaments. The filaments are not only tremendously complex, but appear to have less mass than expelled in the original supernova and a higher speed than expected from a free explosion. The featured image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, is presented in three colors chosen for scientific interest. The Crab Nebula spans about 10 light-years. In the nebula's very center lies a pulsar: a neutron star as massive as the Sun but with only the size of a small town. The Crab Pulsar rotates about 30 times each second.
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Full Moon Rising over Mount Olympus

This is the full Moon rising over a ridge-line on Mount Olympus (Euboea), on Evia (Euboea) Island, Greece. This shot was taken from the village of Pissonas, just after sunset on May 29, 2018. Evia is the second largest Greek island in area and population, after Crete.

Though the Moon is the same angular size as it rises as it is when it's overhead, the full Moon looks huge when it's on or just above the horizon as a result of a well-known, but often debated optical illusion. This Moon illusion is related to the way we perceive the sky to be a finite distance from us and the way our brains judge distance. Take a look at the full Moon as it rises tomorrow night. It's the most distant full Moon of 2018. Nonetheless, it'll loom large when it breaks the horizon.

Image Credit: Dimitris Malliaris
Caption Credit: Dimitris Malliaris; Jim Foster
Image Date: May 29, 2018
Release Date: August 27, 2018
Location: Pissonas, Greece
Coordinates: 38.527695, 23.721093

Technical details: Pentax K-3 II camera; Pentax HD DA 55-300mm, F4.5-6.3, ED PLM, WR, RE lens; 300 mm focal length; ƒ/10 aperture; 1/25 sec. exposure time; ISO 400; Adobe Photoshop

#Astronomy #Space #Science #Earth #Moon #Lunar #Orbit #SolarSystem #Pissonas #Evia #Euboea #Island #MountOlympus #Greece #Ελλάδα #Europe #Skywatching #Astrophotography #Photography #STEM #Education #EPOD
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Aurora around Saturn's North Pole
Image Credit: +NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA, Hubble, OPAL Program, J. DePasquale (STScI), L. Lamy (Obs. Paris)
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180903.html

Are Saturn's auroras like Earth's? To help answer this question, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cassini spacecraft monitored Saturn's North Pole simultaneously during Cassini's final orbits around the gas giant in September 2017. During this time, Saturn's tilt caused its North Pole to be clearly visible from Earth. The featured image is a composite of ultraviolet images of aurora and optical images of Saturn's clouds and rings, all taken recently by Hubble. Like on Earth, Saturn's northern auroras can make total or partial rings around the pole. Unlike on Earth, however, Saturn's auroras are frequently spirals -- and more likely to peak in brightness just before midnight and dawn. In contrast to Jupiter's auroras, Saturn's auroras appear better related to connecting Saturn's internal magnetic field to the nearby, variable, solar wind. Saturn's southern auroras were similarly imaged back in 2004 when the planet's South Pole was clearly visible to Earth.
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The NGC 6914 Complex
Image Credit & Copyright: Ivan Eder
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180830.html

A study in contrasts, this colorful skyscape features stars, dust, and glowing gas in the vicinity of NGC 6914. The complex of reflection nebulae lies some 6,000 light-years away, toward the high-flying northern constellation Cygnus and the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. Obscuring interstellar dust clouds appear in silhouette while reddish hydrogen emission nebulae, along with the dusty blue reflection nebulae, fill the cosmic canvas. Ultraviolet radiation from the massive, hot, young stars of the extensive Cygnus OB2 association ionize the region's atomic hydrogen gas, producing the characteristic red glow as protons and electrons recombine. Embedded Cygnus OB2 stars also provide the blue starlight strongly reflected by the dust clouds. The nearly 1 degree wide telescopic field of view spans about 100 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 6914.
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