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Jeremy Dent
5,316 followers -
Digital marketing practitioner and manager
Digital marketing practitioner and manager

5,316 followers
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Having trouble upgrading my camera firmware. I download it, copy it to a memory card, place the card in my X-e2 and restart the camera with the Disp Back button down. It goes so far through the process and then says the file is not recognised. Any ideas?

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Draws you in: lovely!
Resturant in Topkapi palace,Istanbul,Turkey.
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A valuable, enthralling workshop.
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'Forget boring buyer personas! In this article, I will show you how the ability to identify personality types can help you propel your B2B social media advertising to another level.'
http://buff.ly/2vfjCEe
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Struggling to do my straightforward push-ups but gotta think big!
Do you need to up your pushup game? Check out these twenty-five variations on the classic pushup, guaranteed to pump (clap) you up. 
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Some good things happening in America.
"The ruling has big implications: If existing federal law and the 14th Amendment shield trans people from discrimination, then it’s not just Whitaker’s rights that are protected here, but all trans students’. And if bans against sex discrimination in particular apply to trans people, then it’s not just students’ rights that are protected, but all trans people who face discrimination in other settings where sex discrimination is banned — so not just schools, but the workplace and housing as well."
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We've got serious road trip envy looking at this amazing shot of Kylesku Bridge. The distinctively curved bridge crosses over Loch a' Chàirn Bhàin where it meets Loch Glendhu and Loch Glencoul.

📷 IG/csa_adventure | 🔍 Highlands
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How and why I am voting in the 2017 UK General Election

For 35 years or more, Conservative, Labour and coalition governments have espoused neo-liberalism, a philosophy that backs free enterprise to sort many of our problems and has created a global economy of expanding trade, selling off publicly-owned assets and free financial movement.

This has brought many benefits (at the cost of minimal labour protection in lower cost economies) but has created inequality in Western economies on a scale not seen since the 1920s.

It also hasn't worked in many areas. The UK has sold its utilities and railways to foreign investors and there is no sign that these monopolies and oligopolies deliver savings or efficiencies. There is no real competition at all in many "free enterprise" projects and a widely-held conviction (over 60% of the UK supports rail renationalisation) that an economic elite are the only people really benefiting.

Apart from the Green Party, no manifesto is paying much more than lip service to climate change and the changing energy market, to air pollution and intensive farming malpractices, to big pharma evils and a lack of accounting for the real costs of industry.

I volunteer at a grassroots level in several transition organisations to grow vegetables, set up community renewable energy schemes and promote cycling.

The idea of the "commons", shared community-held assets to help communities help themselves, is something that will help us weather the coming storms of increased climate volatility and energy crises but mainstream politicians barely give them a second's thought.

I am a Northener and lived in Greater Manchester for over 30 years and feel the pain and trauma of last week's bomb attack on the Manchester Arena. There is a connection between our policies in the Middle East and Britons, ethnically and religiously connected to Arab communities, becoming radicalised.

I was utterly gobsmacked at Blair's backing of armed intervention in Iraq, and the myth of weapons of mass destruction, and the hands-off bombing of Libya which has plunged that country into a breeding ground for jihadism.

I am a Member of the Labour Party but have voted against my natural alliance in the past when I thought they were wrong.

I have watched this election campaign attentively, actually read most of the manifestos and watched some of the debates.

A few months ago, I might have given Theresa May some benefit of any doubt but her attitude to Europe, her governing and policy-making through her two special advisors (ignoring the Cabinet and her Party colleagues), her inflexibility and unwillingness to think on her feet and and debate, her espousal of one-nation Toryism but a lack of consistency between talk and action, her abuse directed at Jeremy Corbyn, her U-turn on the dementia tax, her misunderstanding of the funding of vital national assets like the police, Armed Services and the NHS, her blinkered approach to Trident, her merciless removal of help to the disabled...the blacklist is a big one.

Jeremy Corbyn's leadership qualities are doubted by many but, as the campaign has gone on, he has maintained his consistency (in stark contrast to May). He has charm and personal warmth and, according to many experts in strategy and defence, his stance on foreign policy makes a lot of sense.I think he would combine well with Nicola Sturgeon and the SNP.

Leadership comes in many forms (and not just the one-policy, charismatic leader like Thatcher and Blair who both eventually led us into policy cul-de-sacs). Corbyn listens well and collaborates effectively and, most importantly, retains his integrity.

May is stiff, brittle, can't think on her feet (see PM's Question Time performances) and relies on an ideological cell in Downing Street which could be catastrophic in a new Government and Brexit negotiations.

The LibDems? They have some good ideas but Nick Clegg's promise to abolish university tuition fees and then caving in on reaching coalition government was as terminal as Tiger Woods's serial adulteries.

Our nuclear deterrent, Trident, will become obsolete soon, politically and militarily. Our Defence Staff know it, commentators talk about it, even Putin knows it.

The real future threats are cyber attacks and small terrorist actions. North Korea will be crushed by China when their behaviour gets past a certain threshold. What we need is elite strike forces like the United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) which can offer a point force deterrent and to spend Trident money on cyber, artificial intelligence and drone research.

There are four "radical right" policies where I understand the raw emotion behind them and are some of the reasons people vote UKIP and now Tory: stopping benefits for people who refuse to accept employment; ending parole for murder convicts; a ban on immigration; ending overseas aid.

The immigration issue is complex and Theresa May, as Home Secretary, promised to slow immigration and signally failed to do so for four consecutive years.

I voted to Remain in the EU and personally feel that immigration is our lifeblood and we must work out a way of living more in harmony with Moslem communities (and Hindu and Sikhs) as the Protestant majority did with a Catholic minority over 300 years ago. Harsh immigration will damage us in economic, cultural and educational ways.

So I will vote Labour with my heart and with my mind. If we manage our national assets like utilities, rail, waterways, roads. health and social care, police and Armed Services, post office on everyone's behalf and allow free enterprise to blossom in areas where there is real competition, we will have a mixed economy that so thrives in Scandinavia.
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