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Watch live coverage of the Supreme Court's ruling that tax credits offered with #ACA health insurance policies are legal. http://wb.md/1fFvNlS
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The Comeback: Stories of Resilience
From the Editors of +WebMD  and +Sports Illustrated

The Long, Hard Road (06:07)

An ordinary play ended Garrett Richards' extraordinary 2014 season. Now the Los Angeles Angels star pitcher has battled all the way back after a lengthy injury rehab that wasn't always easy.

Watch: http://wb.md/1GqPncb
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"People who are racist in a way that they see a group as less than human and develop strong negative feelings of contempt towards the group basically are predisposed to do something bad." #Charleston #Shooting #Racism #Psychology #MentalHealth  
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Can You Take Antidepressants While Pregnant?

By Kelli Miller
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy, MD, MPH

June 12, 2015 -- If you're pregnant (or are trying to be) and you have depression, you might wonder if it's safe to take medicine to boost your mood. Will antidepressants harm your baby? Spend a day online and the ping-pong reports of their safety during pregnancy could make your head spin.

The issue has long been a topic of debate. Some studies suggest antidepressants are dangerous for babies in the womb. Others say the risks are extremely small, and that untreated depression poses a bigger threat to both the baby and mom.

Also, "there's an idea that antidepressants are a luxury medicine, and women should be pulling up their socks and getting through their pregnancy without taking them," says Jennifer Payne, MD, director of the Women's Mood Disorders Center at Johns Hopkins. "But what most people do not understand is the risk of untreated depression to both the mother and baby is substantial."

More Pregnant Women Using Antidepressants

Depression affects millions of pregnant women. It's due in part to changes in the mood-boosting chemicals in the brain. Commonly used antidepressants can help balance these chemicals.

"Roughly about 1 in 10 women [takes] an antidepressant during pregnancy," says Krista Huybrechts, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital. She's written research on the topic, including a recent report.

Use of such meds by pregnant women has skyrocketed in the last two decades. One type, called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), now ranks among the top 20 drugs prescribed during pregnancy. In 1998, no antidepressants made that list, according to a recent commentary in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. Despite the wide use, there is limited data on the drugs' dangers,

Read more: http://wb.md/1FXdQFU
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Millibrain tonic, Milliturium 3 X 2 caps, Milligesic oil 3xa tsp, & knock
nerves with brush on ache and smeared with Milligesic cream can cure brain
tumor 6 cm for 4 month and they used for 5 month. I hope with innovation
formula 2015 it will be cure more rapidly. In shaa Allah
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BPA in Canned Foods Less Common, but Still There

By Kathleen Doheny, Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on June 02, 2015

June 3, 2015 -- At least a third of canned foods have the chemical BPA in their linings, according to a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

The report found that BPA, or bisphenol A, is less commonly used to line the inside of metal food cans today. Research has linked the chemical to several health problems.

"Definitely the trend is moving away from BPA,'' says Renee Sharp, director of research at the EWG. "But there is a long way to go."

The BPA Scorecard

The EWG looked at 252 brands made by 119 companies between January and August 2014. They asked if the company used BPA-based coatings to line the metal food cans. The lining protects the food from touching the metal.

Sharp says federal regulations don't require manufacturers to identify BPA-free cans, so consumers have no way of knowing which cans are free of the chemical.

The FDA says the chemical is safe in food packaging and containers. A spokeswoman for the North American Metal Packaging Alliance says she is “disappointed” by the report.

The EWG survey findings:

12% of the brands, or 31, used BPA-free cans for all of their canned products.

14%, or 34 brands, used BPA-free cans for one or more of their canned products.

31%, or 78, used BPA for all their canned products.

43% of brands supplied incomplete or ambiguous answers to survey questions or did not respond.

BPA-free brands include:

Read more: http://wb.md/1IcXbkK
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Ruling Supports Tax Credits for Health Insurance
WebMD Health News

June 25, 2015 -- Millions of people who received tax credits to pay for health insurance will get to keep them.

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the tax credits, offered on Affordable Care Act insurance policies sold through Healthcare.gov, are legal.

The Court’s decision protects health insurance coverage for nearly 6.4 million Americans with low-to-moderate income in 34 states who are relying on tax credits to afford health insurance.

A decision saying the tax credits were illegal could have sent insurance markets into “sheer chaos,” says Linda Blumberg, senior fellow with the Urban Institute.

The case, King vs. Burwell, centered on one clause in the Affordable Care Act (also known as "Obamacare"), the health insurance law that set up the Marketplaces.

The language says tax credits are available to people who enroll in health insurance “through an Exchange established by the state.”

The law’s challengers said this meant that people from states that did not set up their own marketplaces weren’t eligible for the credits. Read more: http://wb.md/1GtrnFn
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The Benefits of Exercise Go Way Beyond the Muscles

By Brenda Goodman, MA
Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on June 22, 2015

June 22, 2015 -- Every year, John Thyfault snaps the same photo, and it makes him a little sad.

Thyfault, PhD, is an associate professor at Kansas University Medical Center, where he studies the health effects of exercise. Each year, he travels to the American Diabetes Association’s annual scientific sessions.

The meeting attracts roughly 18,000 people and is held in massive convention centers that span the distances of several football fields, their floors connected by long staircases and humming escalators.

Conference organizers pick a prominent set of stairs and lay down a decal with the logo for their “Stop Diabetes” campaign -- a hand with a drop of blood on the fingertip. It’s meant to remind attendees to take the stairs instead of riding the escalator.

Each time they put the sign up, Thyfault stands at the foot of the stairs and whips out his smartphone. The stairs are nearly empty, but the escalator is packed. To him, it’s a picture worth a thousand pills.

“Exercise and physical activity is not something that you just do extra in your life to get extra healthy. Rather, it’s something that’s absolutely necessary for normal function,” he says.

Thyfault hopes to make more people aware that exercise benefits the body in ways that go far beyond muscle tissue and burning fat.

“We were meant to exercise quite a bit every day to survive, and now we’ve taken it away, and we’re actually causing dysfunction,” he says.

Exercise and Blood Sugar

He’s passionate about exercise because his research has shown again and again how critical it is to health. He says when he’s tried to cause disease, for example, by feeding rats or mice high-fat diets, he can’t do it as long as the animals are exercising.

“Inactivity is the foundational piece that has to be there for these diseases to develop,” he says.

In one experiment, for example, he took healthy people who were walking at least 10,000 steps a day and asked them to walk less -- around 5,000 steps a day, about as much exercise as the average American gets. > Read more: http://wb.md/1Gm5ckq
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బాగుంది
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#MERS Is Back. Should You Be Concerned?

WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

Editor’s note: This story was updated on June 18, 2015.

May 5, 2014 -- The deadly respiratory virus known as MERS, first identified in 2012 in the Middle East, has resurfaced in Asia.

In this latest outbreak, more than 160 cases and nearly 20 deaths have been reported in South Korea as of June 17, along with one case in China.

The CDC is urging doctors to consider the MERS virus when seeing sick patients in the U.S. who have traveled recently to South Korea or the Middle East.

Even so, public health experts say there is no need to panic, as the infection is hard to catch without close contact.

Here are some commonly asked questions:

What is MERS?
Middle East respiratory syndrome is an illness caused by a virus called a coronavirus. It's also sometimes referred to as MERS-CoV, for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

It's a close cousin of the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) virus that infected more than 8,000 people worldwide in 2003, killing 774. But MERS doesn't appear to spread as easily as SARS.

Coronaviruses are common globally, the CDC says. Five different types can make people sick. They also infect animals.

Although some coronaviruses cause mild to moderate upper respiratory illness, MERS, like SARS, can cause severe illness and death.

What are the symptoms of MERS?

The most common symptoms are fever, cough, and shortness of breath.
How common is the illness? Where is it found?

More than 1,200 cases have been confirmed worldwide to date, according to the CDC, with nearly 450 deaths, for a death rate of 37%.
In all, 25 countries have reported cases since 2012, when MERS was first identified in Saudi Arabia. In the U.S., two people learned they had MERS in 2014. Both had traveled... Read more: http://wb.md/1Gac58u
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Black widow spider bites may cause stabbing pain in the bite area, but they can also be painless. Look for one or two red fang marks, redness, tenderness, and a nodule at the bite site. Severe muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting, seizure, and a rise in blood pressure may follow soon after. Get medical care immediately. Anti-venom medicine is available. If possible, bring the spider with you for positive identification. From: http://t.co/hEaMivWVd6
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FDA: Farewell to Trans Fats

By Kathleen Doheny
Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on June 16, 2015

June 16, 2015 -- A number of popular foods are about to lighten up. The FDA is all but banning the use of partially hydrogenated oils, the main source of artery-clogging artificial trans fats, in processed food.

Food manufacturers will have three years to remove partially hydrogenated oils from products, the agency says in a statement.

Experts can’t say there’s any safe level of trans fats to eat, "because we don't have the evidence," says Walter Willett, MD, MPH, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Food makers have found substitutes for these controversial fats, he says, which proves "there's absolutely no need for trans fats in the food supply."

Today's final decision follows the agency's initial judgment in 2013 that the status of these fats should be changed. Those actions follow decades of research showing they boost the risk of heart disease

"We generally support the goal of reduced trans fat,'' says Robert Collette, president of the Institute of Shortening and Edible Oils, whose members make the products.

"We will continue to do what we have done for the past 10 years -- work with the food industry in formulating other alternatives."

Tuesday's FDA decision removes trans fats from a category known as ''generally recognized as safe" (GRAS). Ingredients in the GRAS category can be added to food without FDA approval.

The move now means makers must get the agency’s approval to use trans fats in food.

The fats are used to help give foods stability, extend shelf life, and sometimes improve ''mouth feel,'' the response to a food's texture and flavor.

Public health experts praised the decision. Food makers pointed out that they’ve been gradually phasing out trans fats for years, but warn that some foods won't taste the same without them.

What Are Trans fats?

They’re found in some processed foods, including desserts, microwave popcorn, frozen pizzas, coffee creamer, and margarines. The fats can raise LDL ''bad'' cholesterol and lower HDL ''good" cholesterol.

"Studies show that diet and nutrition play a key role in preventing chronic health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, and today's action goes hand in hand with other FDA initiatives to improve the health of Americans, including... Read more: http://wb.md/1JVnYUd
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About time
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'Gut Feelings': More Than Heartburn, Indigestion?

By Rita Rubin
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

June 5, 2015 -- If promising but early studies pan out, psychiatrists of the future could make a most unusual request of their patients: a sample of their stool.

Yes, the bodily specimen used to help diagnose digestive diseases might also offer clues as to what’s happening at the other end of someone's anatomy.

Intriguing research, done mainly in rats and mice so far, suggests that bacteria that live in the gut influence brain development, mood, and behavior. Someday, doctors might be able to treat mood disorders with probiotics, supplements containing good gut bacteria; prebiotics, which promote the growth of good bacteria in the gut; or highly specific antibiotics that kill bad gut bacteria.

Depression “clearly isn’t all about Prozac and serotonin,” says Roger McIntyre, MD, who directs the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University of Toronto. “We need to look at alternative explanations, alternative treatments.”

And at least for some people with a mental illness, a major contributing factor might be the 100 trillion bacteria -- “aliens,” as Dartmouth microbiologist and immunologist Lloyd Kasper, MD, calls them -- that live in the gut.

Scientists call this two-way street the gut-brain axis, and they're just beginning to learn how the two organs talk with each other. “We’re so far at the tip of the iceberg on this that we don’t know where it’s going to go,” Kasper says.

Babies are born with sterile guts, but bacteria begin moving in within hours. The bacteria population remains relatively stable from age 3 onward, but things like environment, diet, drug exposure, and genetics can influence which ones thrive, McIntyre says.

Healthy people tend to have similar types and proportions of gut bacteria. Changes in the gut bacteria have been linked not only to digestive disorders but also to metabolic and brain disorders, says Jane Foster, PhD, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at McMaster University.

In an interview, Foster described several possible ways that gut bacteria and the brain communicate.

Read more: http://wb.md/1FzbCwg
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Good point, but other cultures use the term Chakra, it's become a mostly universal concept. Plus if you look carefully at certain cultural beliefs they are almost identical to "Chakra" points. (http://www.compassionatedragon.com/images/chakras/chakrasedited.jpg : chinese, http://www.indianetzone.com/photos_gallery/74/2_Chakra_Paintings.jpg : Indian, https://coconutcreamcare.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/medicinewheelnotitles500.jpg : Native American medicine wheel, https://janeadamsart.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/jacobs-ladder-11.jpg : Jewish Chakra system on the tree of life, http://www.energyenhancement.org/chakras/holy_ladder.gif : 7 rungs of the ladder represent the 7 chakra the steps to ascension or those that lead to becoming a saint.
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New Meds OK’d for Hard-to-Treat IBS With Diarrhea
By Kathleen Doheny
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

May 28, 2015 -- The FDA has approved two new prescription medications to treat irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea, or IBS-D. It’s the latest step in a years-long struggle to find safe and effective treatments for the condition.

“I think patients with IBS should be very excited to have more options,” says Lawrence Schiller, MD, program director of the gastroenterology fellowship at Baylor University Medical Center.

“Neither drug is a miracle, but they are both likely to be helpful for some patients.”

The two medications are Viberzi (eluxadoline) and Xifaxan (rifaximin). Viberzi helps you have fewer bowel contractions, which leads to less diarrhea. Xifaxan is an antibiotic that’s thought to work by changing your gut bacteria and reducing diarrhea.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is estimated to affect up to 15% of Americans, or more than 45 million people, according to the National Institutes of Health. But only about half of those people have gotten diagnosed with the condition by a doctor.

IBS affects about twice as many women as men, and it most often happens in those under age 45.

There are several types of it. In IBS-D, diarrhea is the main symptom. Other types include IBS-C, in which constipation is the main symptom, and mixed IBS, where constipation and diarrhea alternate.

IBS isn't linked to more serious diseases like cancer, but the symptoms can be painful and may interfere with your daily life.

Read more: http://wb.md/1Jcnnxh
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Go the emergency room. For more info, go to www.webmd.com and enter "hemorrhage" in the search field.
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