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Aspen Dental Care - Root Canal Treatment, Dental Implants, Dentists in Bangalore
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Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, the third molars, are the last adult teeth to come in between the ages of 17 and 21. When a wisdom tooth is unable to fully break through (mostly because there’s not enough room in the mouth), it is said to be "impacted." The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons or AAOMS, says that nine out of ten people have at least one impacted wisdom tooth.

wisdom-teeth
When does my wisdom tooth become a problem?
A wisdom tooth may grow sideways, tilted in your jaw. Some may emerge only partially or remain completely trapped under the gum and bone. Wisdom teeth becomes a problem when they push on the neighboring molars causing damage and infection. They are also more vulnerable to decay because this area of the mouth can be difficult to clean. In some cases, wisdom teeth may grow in a sac within the jaw and become filled with fluid, developing a cyst that may gouge the jawbone and damage the nerves of the adjacent teeth.

How do I know if my wisdom teeth are impacted?
An impacted tooth can be painless, showing no symptoms. However, when it becomes infected (pericoronitis) or starts causing other dental problems, you may experience some of these signs and symptoms:

Pain or swelling of the gums or jaw bone
Pain when chewing or biting
Difficulty opening your jaw
Prolonged headache
Bad breath
A bad taste in the mouth
Swollen lymph nodes in the neck
According to a study by the AAOMS and the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, wisdom teeth that come in normally may still be susceptible to disease. AAOMS advises that the third molars be assessed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon by the time a patient is a young adult. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are specially trained to evaluate wisdom teeth, disease status and suggest patient-specific treatment plan.
Aspen dental Care
Call : +9188929817514
+919741224772
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IMPACTED WISDOM TEETH

Wisdom teeth, the third molars, are the last adult teeth to come in between the ages of 17 and 21. When a wisdom tooth is unable to fully break through (mostly because there’s not enough room in the mouth), it is said to be "impacted." The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons or AAOMS, says that nine out of ten people have at least one impacted wisdom tooth.

wisdom-teeth
When does my wisdom tooth become a problem?
A wisdom tooth may grow sideways, tilted in your jaw. Some may emerge only partially or remain completely trapped under the gum and bone. Wisdom teeth becomes a problem when they push on the neighboring molars causing damage and infection. They are also more vulnerable to decay because this area of the mouth can be difficult to clean. In some cases, wisdom teeth may grow in a sac within the jaw and become filled with fluid, developing a cyst that may gouge the jawbone and damage the nerves of the adjacent teeth.

How do I know if my wisdom teeth are impacted?
An impacted tooth can be painless, showing no symptoms. However, when it becomes infected (pericoronitis) or starts causing other dental problems, you may experience some of these signs and symptoms:

Pain or swelling of the gums or jaw bone
Pain when chewing or biting
Difficulty opening your jaw
Prolonged headache
Bad breath
A bad taste in the mouth
Swollen lymph nodes in the neck
According to a study by the AAOMS and the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, wisdom teeth that come in normally may still be susceptible to disease. AAOMS advises that the third molars be assessed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon by the time a patient is a young adult. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are specially trained to evaluate wisdom teeth, disease status and suggest patient-specific treatment plan.
Aspen dental Care
Call : +9188929817514
+919741224772
Photo
Add a comment...

Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, the third molars, are the last adult teeth to come in between the ages of 17 and 21. When a wisdom tooth is unable to fully break through (mostly because there’s not enough room in the mouth), it is said to be "impacted." The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons or AAOMS, says that nine out of ten people have at least one impacted wisdom tooth.

wisdom-teeth
When does my wisdom tooth become a problem?
A wisdom tooth may grow sideways, tilted in your jaw. Some may emerge only partially or remain completely trapped under the gum and bone. Wisdom teeth becomes a problem when they push on the neighboring molars causing damage and infection. They are also more vulnerable to decay because this area of the mouth can be difficult to clean. In some cases, wisdom teeth may grow in a sac within the jaw and become filled with fluid, developing a cyst that may gouge the jawbone and damage the nerves of the adjacent teeth.

How do I know if my wisdom teeth are impacted?
An impacted tooth can be painless, showing no symptoms. However, when it becomes infected (pericoronitis) or starts causing other dental problems, you may experience some of these signs and symptoms:

Pain or swelling of the gums or jaw bone
Pain when chewing or biting
Difficulty opening your jaw
Prolonged headache
Bad breath
A bad taste in the mouth
Swollen lymph nodes in the neck
According to a study by the AAOMS and the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, wisdom teeth that come in normally may still be susceptible to disease. AAOMS advises that the third molars be assessed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon by the time a patient is a young adult. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are specially trained to evaluate wisdom teeth, disease status and suggest patient-specific treatment plan.
Aspen dental Care
Call : +9188929817514
+919741224772
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Which mouthwash should you use? 

Mouthwash alone is not a substitute for proper brushing and flossing.
Today's advertisements for mouthwashes (aka mouthrinses) are so appealing, one may think rinsing is sufficient for daily oral healthcare needs. Mouthwash alone is not a substitute for proper brushing and flossing, but it can be complementary.

Mouthwashes are primarily classified as either therapeutic, cosmetic or a combination of the two.
Cosmetic rinses can be found in the dental aisle at most markets. These products help remove debris, decrease bacteria in the mouth and freshen breath. Therapeutic rinses contain an added active ingredient that help protect against oral diseases as well as freshen breath. They are usually labeled as anti-plaque or anti-cavity.

In some cases, special medicinal rinses are prescribed for cases of periodontal (gum) disease, xerostomia (dry mouth) and cavities.

When choosing a mouthwash, avoid products with alcohol as it dries the gum tissues.
When choosing a mouthwash, avoid products with alcohol as it dries the gum tissues. In most cases, there is no harm in using mouthrinse on a daily basis. Although with proper brushing and flossing it is not necessary.

As with most products, there can be side effects. Mouthwashes can lead to mouth ulcers, root sensitivity, stains, soreness and changes in taste sensation. If these systems arise, please discontinue use of the rinse.

Children under 12 years old are not recommended to use mouthwash. Proper brushing and flossing is sufficient and should be encouraged. Children with a high risk of decay (cavities) may be instructed by a dental professional to use a daily mouthwash with fluoride.

If you're looking for a rinse to use daily, try Oral B Pro-Expert or speak with your Dentist or Dental Hygienist to find out what's best for your oral health!
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Immediately-loaded Dental Implants:
What You Need To Know

The whole procedure of dental rehabilitation is done in one session only and takes approximately 2 hours.
Answers to the most commonly asked questions about immediately-loaded dental implants.

1. What are immediately loaded implants? Are same day implants the same as immediately loaded implants?
In modern dentistry, missing teeth should be ideally restored by insertion of dental implants. In many cases and specifically in the aesthetic regions, where patient would show gaps after tooth extraction, a single dental implant can be placed immediately after tooth extraction into the fresh extraction socket. In most cases, the implant is stable enough to be loaded with an immediate implant crown. To allow for osseointegration of the implant, the surrounding bone has to grow right onto the implants surface without being disturbed by any movements of the implant. This is why the immediate crown on a newly inserted single dental single implant should not be subjected to any masticatory forces for several weeks.


In cases where rehabilitation of all teeth in upper or lower jaws is necessary, at least 4 implants (better more) should be inserted into one jaw. The whole dentition can then be attached to these implants as a suprastructure. Due to different biomechanics, minor masticatory (chewing) forces can be tolerated immediately.

The term same day implants is mainly used for advertising purposes, but indeed comprises immediate loading of the newly placed dental implant.

2. Who are the best candidates for immediately loaded implants?
Ideally the best candidates are young, healthy, nonsmoking patients without any periodontal disease and sufficient amount of bone, which of course is almost never the case! There is always a specific reason for the necessity to remove a tooth/teeth and each case has to be investigated individually for the suitability of extraction with immediate implant placement and loading. In general, there is very few absolute contraindications.

3. What are the benefits of immediately loaded implants?
Following a conservative treatment modality means to wait 3-6 months after tooth extraction. Then the implant is placed and another 3 months for osseointegration are awaited before the restoration with a crown takes place. This is an almost unacceptable long period of time for our modern society! But more importantly, another negative side effect might occur during this waiting periods which is resorption of bone and recession of gums.

The success rates of extraction with immediate implant placement and immediate loading of primary stable implants do not differ from the conservative treatment modality.
Insertion of a dental implant right after tooth extraction with immediate placement of a crown has a superior outcome when it comes to the long term aesthetics of the surrounding tissues. The alveolar bone surrounding the newly placed immediately restored implant and its surrounding gums will be preserved to its maximum degree. It should be the treatment modality of choice for aesthetic areas where the patient shows gums when smiling!

And of course it is a nice side effect for the patient to get a complete dental rehabilitation in a day and not to suffer from a socially unacceptable tooth gap for several months neither to struggle with some temporary removable denture.

4. What is the success rate of immediately loaded implants?
The success rates of extraction with immediate implant placement and immediate loading of primary stable implants do not differ from the conservative treatment modality, when the suitability is clinically assessed prior to surgery. Prognosis can be compromised due to periodontal disease, insufficient oral hygiene, or systemic disease but then all dental surgical procedures are more prone to complications independent of which implant insertion concept was followed.

5. What is the procedure like? How many appointments will it take to get the implants and crowns done?
The removal of the tooth is the more invasive surgical part. Inserting the dental implant into the fresh extraction socket is easily practicable. In most cases the implant is stable enough in the anterior jaw and can be immediately restored with a chairside custom made temporary crown. The whole procedure of dental rehabilitation is done in one session only and takes approximately 2 hours.

6. What can patients expect after receiving their implants?
Depending on each patient individually and the location of extraction and implant placement, some amount of swelling and pain, must be expected for about 3-5 days and even bruising might occur.

7. How often should patients come to visit their oral surgeon after the implants are done?
It is advisable to have a follow-up with the surgeon approximately a week after implant placement and again prior to restoration with the permanent crown. In the long term, the implant maintenance constitutes of regular sessions with the dental hygienist and normal follow-ups with the dentist.
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In Focus: Mouth Breathing in Children

Do you often see your child breathing through his mouth? Our specialists discuss the cause, dangers and treatment for young mouth breathers.

What are the signs and causes of mouth breathing?
Mouth breathing is a very common problem that begins in childhood and can continue unnoticed till adulthood.

“It has two major types - pathological or habitual. Pathological mouth breathing has an underlying cause such as enlarged adenoids, deviated nasal septum, asthma, allergic rhinitis, etc., where there is an actual obstruction to the nasal airway, hence the child resolves to breathing through the mouth to get the required amount of oxygen the body needs.”

“Habitual mouth breathing is where the child develops such habit after having a strong cold accompanied by nasal obstruction or allergy that caused him to breathe through the mouth during his illness. In this case, even after the cold subsides, the child continues to breathe through the mouth out of habit.”

“A parent can identify if his child has such a problem, by observing them from a distance while they are playing or watching TV.If your child fails to keep his lips sealed during normal activity and keeps his mouth open for breathing, snores during sleep, has under eye circles, has crooked teeth, or has a chronic bad breath, then most probably your child is a mouth breather.”

How can mouth breathing affect children’s teeth?
“Mouth breathing can particularly affect the growing face,” , “and these alterations will occur in the muscles associated with the face, tongue and the neck.”

“Untreated airway problems may so severely affect facial growth that orthodontics alone cannot correct the malocclusion. Corrective jaw surgery later in life, in addition to the necessary procedures to open the nasal airway, may be required.”

According to our Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon , mouth breathing throughout the growth stage can cause “specific craniofacial changes including narrow palate (due to missing pressure of tongue on palate), vertical increase (lengthening of lower face) and retruded jaw (1,5). Dental malocclusions are also observed, mainly posterior crossbite and anterior open bite, leading to absence of lip competence (1,3,5).”

Mouth breathing reduces the salivary flow and dries out the mouth. Without the protective functions of saliva, it can “potentially lead to demineralization of teeth with higher risk of decay chronic gingivitis, periodontitis (gum disease), candida infections and halitosis (bad breath) (4).”

Can mouth breathing potentially lead to more serious complications?
Our nose processes the air we breathe before it enters our lungs. Mouth breathing pulls all pollution and germs directly into the lungs; dry cold air in the lungs makes the secretions thick, slows the cleaning cilia, and slows down the passage of oxygen into the blood stream (AAO-HNS).

“mouth breathing bypasses the protective function of the nose and sensitization to inhaled allergens is increased. This may increase asthma morbidity (2).”

It is very important to address mouth breathing at an early age where the treatment is much simpler and faster. Mouth breathing can affect the growth and development of your child. It may affect quality of sleep and lead to poor concentration during the day.

Who can diagnose and treat mouth breathing?
If your child is mouth breathing, take him/her to an ENT specialist. They are doctors who diagnose and manage diseases of the ears, nose, larynx, sinuses, throat, as well as structures of the neck and face.

Your child’s dentist can help prevent the habit by providing trainers and appliances that will progress the development of normal nasal breathing patterns and consequently help in developing proper alignment and occlusion of your child’s teeth.

Aspen Dental Care
+918892817514
+919741224772
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What should you do when your tooth is cracked?

If you can see a crack in your tooth, it is important to visit your dentist as soon as possible.

A tooth crack is a visible line either from the gum line to the tip or at the cusp – the pointed biting part of your tooth. While your tooth might not be into 2 parts, the tissue inside the tooth is probably damaged. If you don’t have the problem fixed, the tooth will split.

Sometimes adult teeth have “craze lines.” These are tiny cracks in your tooth enamel that shouldn’t cause you pain and don’t need treatment.

If you can’t see a crack, other tell tale signs that you should see a dentist are:

Pain sometimes when chewing (especially when you release a bite)
Discomfort from hot and especially cold foods and drinks
Sweet foods or drinks cause discomfort
Swelling in a small area near the affected tooth
There are 2 ways to treat cracked or chipped teeth: a veneer or a crown.

What a veneer?
Veneer is the ideal solution if your tooth still has enough structure. A veneer is a thin layer of porcelain or plastic that fits over the front of your tooth. To make room for the veneer, your dentist will remove some of the outer enamel (the same thickness as the veneer).

Your dentist then takes an impression of your prepared tooth to make your new veneer. Your veneer is colour matched to your other teeth so that it looks completely natural.

What is a crown?
A crown can repair a tooth that doesn’t have enough structure for a veneer (if your nerve is damaged and infected you might need root canal treatment first). The crown fits over your tooth like a cap and strengthens it.
If you can see a crack in your tooth, it is important to visit your dentist as soon as possible.

A tooth crack is a visible line either from the gum line to the tip or at the cusp – the pointed biting part of your tooth. While your tooth might not be into 2 parts, the tissue inside the tooth is probably damaged. If you don’t have the problem fixed, the tooth will split.

Sometimes adult teeth have “craze lines.” These are tiny cracks in your tooth enamel that shouldn’t cause you pain and don’t need treatment.

If you can’t see a crack, other tell tale signs that you should see a dentist are:

Pain sometimes when chewing (especially when you release a bite)
Discomfort from hot and especially cold foods and drinks
Sweet foods or drinks cause discomfort
Swelling in a small area near the affected tooth
There are 2 ways to treat cracked or chipped teeth: a veneer or a crown.

What a veneer?
Veneer is the ideal solution if your tooth still has enough structure. A veneer is a thin layer of porcelain or plastic that fits over the front of your tooth. To make room for the veneer, your dentist will remove some of the outer enamel (the same thickness as the veneer).

Your dentist then takes an impression of your prepared tooth to make your new veneer. Your veneer is colour matched to your other teeth so that it looks completely natural.

What is a crown?
A crown can repair a tooth that doesn’t have enough structure for a veneer (if your nerve is damaged and infected you might need root canal treatment first). The crown fits over your tooth like a cap and strengthens it.
Call us on +918892817514 to fix your appointment .
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