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M4L Wood Doors
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This video shows an in-swing 8 foot tall French door unit being subject the equivalent of 8" of rain an hour while with water introduced to the doors exterior at winds speeds of 42 mph. Our door was subject to water at this pressure for over one hour at our request opposed to the obligatory 20 minute simulation. Mathematically, it took on over 20" of rain in this test and did not fail until we pushed our wind speeds to over 50 mph after one hour of full on testing. Our out-swing door units passed the same test at a DP-50, or an equivalent of 54 mph rain storm.

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This video displays our French unit under full structural load. The door unit is subject to 174 mph winds for a 10 second period of time and the doors which certifies a DP-50 structural load test. The door unit is blown out and sucked inward under the same extreme loads for the same amount of time. While this video looks as though nothing is happening, watch it in the last few seconds when the pressure is released from the unit. The enormous deflect back to its resting point is quite noticeable. As the pressure builds during testing, the deflection is increased gradually and hard to detect. When the pressure is released, it is like the deflating of a balloon.

The testing is not only a testament to our build quality, but also the for giving nature of a fine wood door.

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New custom entry door we built back in November features seedy baroque insulated glass TDL in door, sidelights and transom.  The mahogany wood was finished in our factory in Hershey PA.
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Millworkforless is advertising on DIY and HGTV. Doors manufactured in Hershey, PA.

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Why is wood a better material than fiberglass for home exterior doors?

The fiberglass door was first developed in the 80’s!  It is not a new technology and with all the developments made in fiberglass door finishing, the doors are still composite fiberglass with stamped graining to look like wood. THEY ARE NOT WOOD!!!!!!!!!!!  You can not properly match real to wood. Fiberglass doors and wood fade at different rates.  When your fiberglass door starts look like a sad sack after a few short years, the finish is done.  The only way to restore the fiberglass door to a decent look is to fully strip it chemically back to raw fiberglass. You can then begin the process of re-staining which is a messy process with the gel stains required.
A wood door can be lightly sanded, wiped down with mineral spirits and re-top-coated for an almost new door finish. The beauty of doing  a maintenance coat on a wood door is the wood continues to cure and age with time much as a fine wine matures.  The only time a wood door must be stripped to bare wood is if the doors receives many years of neglect and the finish is compromised allowing air and water to come in contact with  bare wood for an extended period of time.  When a wood door is scratched or dinged, the effect area is easy to sand, steam and touch up in the location of damage.  When a fiberglass door is damaged, the entire finish must be stripped and reapplied.
The reason most fiberglass doors are stained and hung in frames that are painted is that frames are not readily available in a stainable, match-able product.  Run from fiberglass doors. There is not a single reason to buy them short of you wanting to replace it in five years or less.  And, every customer with fiberglass doors calling to replace with wood doors, says the same thing, “fiberglass, never again!”
Lastly,  a wood door can be whatever you please it to be.   A fiberglass door can be anything for which a stamping moulding has been made.  The molds cost approximately $30,000 to $50,000 each.  So your imagination is only limited by your pocketbook when it comes to fiberglass doors!
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