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Eli van Arya
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Eli van Arya

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This image with a 3 minute exposure, is breathtaking. 
Can't stop to look at it. 

Taken by +Bo Insogna  at June 1.     Click the photo.   :)
 
NEW - Fantastic #lightning show all across the eastern horizon. This is a view from Jackson Lake in Morgan County #Colorado looking East. These #thunderstorm cells went around us giving us a great side view and show as they went out in the NE direction right past our location. Lightning kicked up right after #sunset and went on into the night. There was a day a way full moon to the right out of frame and stars shinning bright above. This is a stack image to get the star trails equal to almost a 3 minute exposure. 6/1/15

#Art #insognaGallery - http://boinsogna.com/featured/lightning-at-sunset-with-star-trails-james-bo-insogna.html
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+Bo Insogna , my pleasure.  :)
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Here is something good to know before you travel.
Save big money on flight tickets by using SaferVPN! Get a new IP address from another country to prevent IP tracking and take advantage of better pricing!
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Photo of the Day: Sebastien Zietz, Portugal. Photo: Glaser
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‫إكستريم فيديو‬‎'s profile photoElizabeth Therese Niwel's profile photoEli van Arya's profile photo
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+إكستريم فيديو - I like that idea too. We could be on the way this summer.  :)
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To take a last breath. 

This image got me feel. 

Shared by  +taiowa .   :) 
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Yes +Akshay Malhotra , I admire it too.  :)
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Another classic: 
May there always be sunshine,  
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me.

My dear friend, my good friend,
People want so much of the world.
And at thirty-five heart again
Do not tire of repeating:

May there always be sunshine,
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me.

May there always be sunshine,
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me.

Hush, soldier, you hear a soldier, -
People are scared of explosions.
Thousands of eyes staring at the sky,
Lips stubbornly repeating:

May there always be sunshine,
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me.

May there always be sunshine,
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me.

Against misfortune, against the war
Stand up for our boys.
Sun - forever! Happiness - forever! -
So ordered people.

May there always be sunshine,
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me.

May there always be sunshine,
May there always be blue sky
May there always be my mother,
May there always be me ... 
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+Elizabeth Therese Niwel - thank you, I will edit.  :)
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The month started with a beautiful close paring of the Moon and Saturn.
The dwarf planet Pluto, largest of the Kuiper Belt objects, will be near the Moon on Friday, June 5. 
What's up for June 2015 by Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
In 3.25
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 *B.B. King* is no longer among us.
The legendary guitarist and American blues singer died at the age of 89 years in Las Vegas May 14, 2015.  

Tribute via +✿◠‿◠ ♥ Kɪʀɴéᴀ ᑕᖺᗩﬡﬡᙓᒪ 1 ♫ 
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✿◠‿◠ ♥ Kɪʀɴéᴀ ᑕᖺᗩﬡﬡᙓᒪ 1 ♫'s profile photoEli van Arya's profile photo
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Dreams over the Rainbow ...  
(2:42)   
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I know why I love Birds.
They know more than we do.  :)

via +Elizabeth Therese Niwel 
 

Many seed-eating boreal species are subject to irruptions, including Bohemian and cedar waxwings, boreal chickadees, red and white-winged crossbills, purple finches, pine and evening grosbeaks, red-breasted nuthatches, and common and hoary redpolls. The authors focused on the pine siskin, a species featured prominently in earlier work on irruptive migrations.   
Previous studies have found evidence that irruptions are triggered by food shortages caused by the large-scale collapse of seed production in northern pine, spruce and fir forests.    
"We've known for a long time that weather was probably important, but prior analyses by ecologists have been unable to identify exactly what role weather was playing in this phenomenon," says ecologist Walt Koenig, a senior scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and co-author of the new study incorporating climate science. "It's a good example of the value of interdisciplinary work," Koenig says.   
To resolve the question, the scientists turned to a remarkable trove of data gathered by backyard birders as part of Project FeederWatch, a citizen science initiative run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. FeederWatcher volunteers systematically record bird sightings from November through early April and they gave the scientists more than two million observations of pine siskins since 1989. The crowd-sourced data makes it possible to track the movement of bird populations at a continent-wide scale.   
"Avid birders across the U.S. and Canada have contributed sustained observations of birds at the same broad geographic scale in which weather and climate have also been observed and understood," says co-author Julio Betancourt, a senior scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston, Virginia.    
Pine siskins breed during summer in Canadian boreal forests, where they rely heavily on tree seeds for food. When seeds are abundant, pine siskins in eastern North America largely stay put in the northern coniferous forests of Canada through the winter. But when seed production is poor, pine siskins and other boreal birds move elsewhere to find overwintering habitat with adequate food. During these irruptive years, the eastern populations of pine siskins forage as far south as the Appalachian Mountains. Western populations show less variability in irruptive movements.   
Amateur birdwatchers have recorded dramatic shifts in siskin migrations over the years. The winter ending in 1990, for example, featured a massive "superflight" south of the boreal forest, while during the winter ending in 2004 there was a near absence of boreal pine siskins in the U.S. The winter ending in 2009 saw another big irruption south of the boreal forest, followed by greatly reduced counts the following winter.    
In the new study, researchers combined FeederWatch observations with climate data in a statistical analysis. This allowed them to link bird population movements with established patterns of climate variability across North America. As expected, they found that extremely cold winters tend to drive birds south during the irruption year.    
More surprisingly, the researchers found a teeter-tottering pattern between the north and south that influences bird migrations two to three years later. When the prevailing weather is wet and cold and unfavourable to seed production in one region, it tends to be warmer and drier and favourable to seed production in the other region.    
This climate "dipole" tends to push and pull bird migrations across the continent. The heaviness of seed production in a given year depends on how favorable the climate was during the two or three previous years required to set and ripen seeds. That means that, in principle, it might be possible to predict irruptions up to two years in advance.  
The finding also raises a question about the impact of global climate change: could the perturbation by massive carbon dioxide emissions disrupt the coupling between north and south such that unfavourable conditions unfold simultaneously, leaving birds with poor seed supplies everywhere in some years? 

Click on, and read more ...  
Scientists have pinpointed the climate pattern that likely sets the stage for boreal bird irruptions in which vast numbers of northern birds migrate far south of their usual winter range. The discovery could make it possible to predict the events more than a year in advance.
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~~ My search for Goodness in the World is still in progress ~~
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 For ever Dreamer
 
~~~~~~~~
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