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Judi Bonilla
313 followers -
Aging Expert. Educator. Social Entrepreneur
Aging Expert. Educator. Social Entrepreneur

313 followers
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Judi's posts

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Our Aging Population Can Be An Economic Powerhouse–If We Let It. http://klou.tt/c3pz7kvbftq 

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Today is Someone Else’s Future
Similar to many of us as a staffer Dolores “Dolli” Cutler attended many meetings. However, the meetings she sat in on affect American society. When I learned of her involvement in the Older Americans Act I thought today is her future. Almost 50 years ago Dolli had a hand in planning her future. Now as a member of the Aging and Independence Services Advisory Council, she continues her involvement. In particular, as a member of the council, serving as a liaison between the agency and older and disabled individuals in the community.

San Diego On Path to Age & Dementia Friendly Community
Today San Diegans have a similar opportunity to shape their future. By joining the County of San Diego’s efforts to make the region Age and Dementia friendly. Most recently the County of San Diego held a series of listening sessions in the community. During sessions community members shared their vision for the future.

What’s in Store For Your Future
Similar to Dolli, you have an opportunity to shape your future. To join the conversation as the county concludes the listening phase take the Age and Dementia Friendly Community Survey. If you are outside of San Diego check the list of AARP Network of Age-Friendly Communities.
Survey Link http://sgiz.mobi/s3/Age-Friendly-Survey

About the Author
Currently, Judi Bonilla is the Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging. She is the author of Freewheeling After Sixty a book for older drivers. In addition, Judi is the first gerontologist to speak at SXSW and has spoken at the American Society on Aging and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. Previously she served as a fellow for Hispanics in Philanthropy and Senior Service America. 
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South Shore Elder Services On The Go With Freewheeling Movement

Go With South Shore Elder Services
Recently the South Shore Elder Services (SSES) outreach team has been on the go! Working with centers throughout 11 communities they have been on a mission. While many older adults plan to age in their home, few know all their options.

South Shore Elder Services the Community Partner
SSES recommends and coordinates resources for elders to help them to remain as independent as possible. With this in mind, the team is using Freewheeling After Sixty to empower older adults to create a personal transportation network. While giving up the keys might be the end of hobbies, interests and socializing. With Freewheeling individuals learn how to create a plan to stay on the go.

You Can Age In Place
To Age in Place requires a plan and support. Through their work, SSES promotes elder independence through the coordination of resources, advocacy, and caregiver support.

Important Links
Freewheeling After Sixty

South Shore Elder Services 

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#AiA17 Presenters Learn How to Promote Your Session

America Society on Aging Presenters
If you are one of the presenting at ASA I know you have been working hard. When you speak at a national conference it’s after years of hard work. First, it was planning your program or services. Then it was developing the project or program. Next, it was the implementation. Finally, the analysis and project reporting. Now at #AiA17 you have the opportunity to share the results of your work.

Get the Word Out About Your Session
In this online seminar, you will learn how to connect and create more “buzz” around your session. Learn how to optimize your profile, use advanced search features, and create a strategy to maximize your conference experience.

Register for ASA Webinar; http://bit.ly/aia2017linkedin

http://judibonilla.com/aia17-presenters-promote-your-session/

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What's Next for This Gerontologist?

A Gerontologist Pivots

On Monday this gerontologist began to pivot. The startup I run will not receive grant funds. My hands shook as I reread the email. A five-year mission to bring travel training to San Diego failed once again. Yes, this entrepreneur owns the word failure. This is what it looks like when you don't get the trophy.

Taking Action After the Pivot

After reading the email, my next step was to begin cost and resource cutting. I sent emails notifying organizations of stepping down from boards and committees. Next, I began canceling memberships and services. You see like most entrepreneurs I have been bootstrapping my business. On Monday, that came to a screeching halt. After the cancellations, I began short term job search. First stop temporary staffing and caregiving agencies. My goal stop my cash hemorrhage and increase my cash flow.

Finding Inspiration

By Wednesday morning I began reviewing my LinkedIn profile. Making phone calls, setting up appointments, and then it happened. President Barack Obama spoke to me. "The only thing that is the end of the world is the end of the world." Well, the world didn't end. We Get Around is on pause not over. I will find another way. There are 10,000 Americans turning age 65 every day. The age 85+ segment is the fastest growing. Lastly, the foundation for senior transportation laid by 74.9 Boomers will be inherited by their 75.4 Millennial grandchildren. Yes, I still have a mission to make it easier to give up the keys for 40,000 aging drivers by 2020. Yes, hope and resilience a powerful combination.



About the Author

Currently, Judi Bonilla is the Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging. She is the first gerontologist to speak at South by Southwest. Judi has also spoken at the American Society on Aging and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. She also served as a fellow for Hispanics in Philanthropy and Senior Service America. Judi is the author of Freewheeling After Sixty a book for older drivers. In addition, you can find her at theaginexpert.com. 

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What’s Next? After the Car Keys Talk
After the Car Keys Talk
Did you know on average, men outlive their ability to drive a car by six years and women outlive their ability by ten years? Can you imagine a decade when you can no longer drive?

Read the excerpt from the new book Freewheeling after Sixty and explore how experienced drivers can boost their freedom and mobility.

Freedom, Mobility, or Something Else?
As Americans, we have grown up hearing the words independence and freedom woven into our cultural language. We celebrate Independence Day and many of us have asserted our personal Declaration of Independence in relationships and careers. For those living through the sixties and influenced by the cultural revolution, freedom may have a special significance. Freedom meant choice and the opportunity to forge a different path than our parents. However, when it comes to driving, the fear of losing independence and freedom can be worrisome for both Boomers and their older family members. That’s why I see the twenty-first-century-older driver as an agent of change with an opportunity to make a lifelong impact.

The Book Freewheeling after Sixty

In a 2012 [1] study by the American Automobile Association (AAA), 50 percent of senior drivers worry about losing their freedom and mobility when it’s time to give up the car keys. Take a moment to think about the words freedom and mobility. How do you associate those to your driving? What does driving means to you? Now ask yourself these questions:

”Is it the right of being able or allowed to do whatever you want, without being controlled or limited? (This is the definition of freedom.)
”The ability to move or be moved freely and easily? (This is the definition of mobility.)
I ask you to consider a third word, interdependence, defined as dependence between two or more people, groups, or things. In the earth sciences, it is the idea that everything in nature is connected to and depends on every other thing. In essence, everything depends on one another. In the next section, I share a personal story of the long-term value of interdependence.

Understanding a Personalized Transportation System (PTS)
The importance of interdependence and sense of community is crucial to the success of using the PTS to create your network. By identifying the value of your contributions over a lifetime is part of creating opportunities to develop your community connections network. The system I’ve created has several different components, giving you freedom of choice to meet your individual needs. By design, your network can expand and contract based on your choices to strengthen and maintain its connections.The Book Freewheeling after Sixty

Are you interested in learning more? Please leave a comment on this post and I will reserve your copy.

About the Author
Judi Bonilla is the Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging. Previously she was a fellow for Hispanic In Philanthropy and Senior Service America, Inc. Bonilla has spoken at South by Southwest (SXSW) the American Society on Aging, and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. She has received a Special Commendation from the City of San Diego for the inaugural Older Driver Awareness Week in San Diego, the Jack Gorelick Achievement Award for her passionate commitment and perseverance to the growth of the profession of travel instruction from the Association of Travel Instruction and the Innovative Transportation Solutions Award from Women In Transportation.
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5 Tips For Finding Senior Transportation

Finding Rides For Aging Drivers
Can you help me get a ride? I’m 76 years old, blind and wheelchair-bound. That was the inspiration for this “How To post” for individuals and family members searching for transportation.Five Tips for Finding Senior Transportation

Five Resources to Kickstart Your Search
1. Find out the riders Zip Code – Senior transportation programs and services are often determined by geographical location. Knowing your Zip Code will help service providers identify location specific programs.

2. Be prepared – To fill out an application and provide information. Since most transportation programs receive federal funding they need documentation about the individuals they serve.

3. Eldercare.gov – First of all start with the national database for senior information. Your local Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) is charged with providing services in your community. Begin the information gathering process with them.

4. Rides In Sight – In addition, call 855.607.4337 a non-profit senior transportation call center. They operate during the business hours of Monday – Friday, 8 AM – 8 PM ET. This organization gathers referrals on public and non-profit services offering senior transportation.

5. Start early – If you are reading this blog post start today rather than delaying your search. Senior transportation is often overlooked until there is an emergency. Starting now provides you with the time to create a strategy to help a loved one age with dignity in their community. In conclusion, now is the time to begin finding a ride.

About the Author
Judi Bonilla is the Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging. Previously she was a fellow for Hispanic In Philanthropy and Senior Service America, Inc. In addition, Bonilla has spoken at South by Southwest (SXSW) the American Society on Aging, and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. Most noteworthy, she has received a Special Commendation from the City of San Diego for the inaugural Older Driver Awareness Week in San Diego, the Jack Gorelick Achievement Award.

This article originally appeared on We Get Around.
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Thoughts on Driving After Sixty
Driving? When do you talk to experienced drivers about alternative transportation? The folks at Home Instead Senior Care suggest the “40-70 Rule.” This means if you are 40, or your parents are 70 it is time to talk. The rule makes sense and so does doing research before talking.

Create a Transportation Plan
Similar to other parts of your life, driving and the topic of transportation are complex. Consider transportation similar to your favorite social media platform. Whether your favorite is Instagram, Pinterest, or Snapchat the experience is better when you connect. So is developing a transportation plan. Identify different resources to connect with. Driver improvement courses, family, friends, community organizations, ridesharing, and public transportation are the connections to make.

Focus on Interdependence
For those living through the fifties and sixties, freedom may have a special significance. Freedom meant choice and the opportunity to forge a different path than their parents. However, when it comes to driving, the fear of losing independence and freedom can be worrisome for both older drivers. The key is to focus on interdependence. The concept focuses on our commitment to one another to live and age well. Before you have the conversation reflect on your connections and then talk.

About Judi Bonilla
Judi Bonilla is a gerontologist, social entrepreneur, Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging, and a personal home advisor with Keepsake Companions. Her latest book Freewheeling after Sixty is planned for a summer 2016 release. Previously she was a fellow for Hispanic In Philanthropy and Senior Service America, Inc. Bonilla has spoken at SXSW, the American Society on Aging, and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. She has received a Special Commendation from the City of San Diego for the inaugural Older Driver Awareness Week in San Diego. In addition, she won the Jack Gorelick Achievement Award and the Innovative Transportation Solutions Award.

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An Accident Close To Home
A colleague suggested I interview her friend, a twenty something entrepreneur injured in a car accident. Why interview someone about an accident? The individual who hit her car was a ninety-four-year-old experienced driver.

A Surprise Accident
As I set up the interview she asked I not share her name as the case was not settled. With that, she began to recount the accident. She was driving a friend home on an early evening night as she crossed through an intersection another vehicle ran a red light. Her car spun through the intersection and stopped on opposite side of the street. As she retold the details of her accident I heard surprise and shock in her voice as she relived the night. “It might have been worse.” That was the refrain throughout our conversation, “It might have been worse.”

You see a few seconds difference, her car might have been t-boned. Her injuries might have been fatal. After the accident she made her way out of the car and woman came towards her. Did I hit you? Was her first question. No, the woman replied I saw the accident. The woman said the other car ran the red light. I thought you might need a witness. Within minutes the police arrived and talked to each driver. She never spoke to the other driver.

The Aftermath
That night of the police deemed both cars drivable and each drove away that night. However, once the insurance adjuster examined the car it was totaled. Written off, beyond repair, and only fit for salvage.“It might have been worse.” Her Prius had been fully paid for and now she faces buying a new car.

About Insurance
In addition, to buying a new car there are other consequences. When she contact the other driver’s insurance company she was told the accident was her fault. Their insured said she had run a red light. Wait, was her response. “I have a witness there was a passenger in the car.” She was told, “Passengers are considered biased and excluded as witnesses.” The Good Samaritan saved the day and the other insurance company eventually accepted responsibility. “It might have been worse.” While she escaped serious injuries, she did not escape injury. Her pain has been debilitating. As a result of the accident, she requires pain medication, physical therapy, and plenty of rest. Working for herself these injuries affected her ability to work, impacting her livelihood. “It might have been worse.”

A Closer Look at Home
She never met the other driver however, she found out his age from the accident report. How bad does he feel? Since the accident, her life has changed. Rest, pain, medication, therapy, and rest. She wonders has his life has changed? She wonders a few seconds of misjudgment has led to so much pain and stress from the accident. “It also might have been worse.” Since the accident she also thinks about her parents. Will they know when it is time to stop driving? As we finished our conversation she said, “Older drivers need to pay attention to their driving. It’s also up to adult children to keep an eye on our older parents driving habits and talk to them.”

Final Thoughts
Age is not the sole reason to give up driving, the ability is. As we age there are physical changes that may affect driving. To maximize your ability to drive safely visit your eye and healthcare provider annually, maintain your flexibility with regular stretching classes, and know the side effects of any prescriptions or supplements may have on your driving.

About Judi Bonilla
Judi Bonilla is a gerontologist, social entrepreneur, Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging, and a personal home advisor with Keepsake Companions. Her latest book Freewheeling after Sixty is planned for a summer 2016 release. Previously she was a fellow for Hispanic In Philanthropy and Senior Service America, Inc. Bonilla has spoken at SXSW, the American Society on Aging, and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. She has received a Special Commendation from the City of San Diego for the inaugural Older Driver Awareness Week in San Diego. In addition, she won the Jack Gorelick Achievement Award and the Innovative Transportation Solutions Award.
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Exercise Benefits Older Drivers
It’s important to understand exercise can benefit the abilities of older drivers. While many know it can improve stress and weight loss few understand how it affects driving.

Consider these points:

The ability to easily maneuver in and out of a car.
The range of motion to turn their head when changing lanes or to back up.
The hand grip strength needed to grasp the steering wheel.
A Commitment to Exercise
A 75-year-old student of mine once asked me, “My job in retirement is to improve my health?” My answer absolutely! The ability to age well is complex and there is no one answer. Instead, it’s a series of choices and connections. For many older adults, physical exercise is not connected to keeping their driver license. As a family member, take the opportunity and make a connection.

Community Resources
The Older Americans Act provides funding to community health promotion programs. Consider these local programs as part of a strategy to stay behind the wheel. In San Diego Aging & Independence Services the program Feeling Fit Clubs. The clubs are offered throughout the county and on cable television. In addition, some Medicare Advantage plans provide SilverSneakers a senior exercise program as a benefit. Additionally, consult the Eldercare Locator for local resources in your community. Finally, driving in older age means creating and taking action. For more ideas, please contact me or comment on this post.

About the Author
Currently, Judi Bonilla is the Director of Program Innovation at Advocates For Aging. She is the first gerontologist to speak at South by Southwest. Judi has also spoken at the American Society on Aging and Certified Senior Advisors conferences. She also served as a fellow for Hispanics in Philanthropy and Senior Service America. Judi is the author of Freewheeling After Sixty a book for older drivers. In addition, the City of San Diego honored her for launching Older Driver Safety Awareness Week. 
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