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Robin C. Mason
220 followers -
Genealogist, writer, editor.
Genealogist, writer, editor.

220 followers
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As a longtime 1692 Salem witch trials researcher, it's frustrating to see the same misinformation being repeated online and in print when the so-called "facts" have been disproved time and again.

Rev. George Burroughs (1650-1692) was called the ringleader of the Salem witches even though he left Salem Village in 1683. He was arrested in Maine and brought back to Massachusetts in chains. Based on spectral evidence (including his two ghost wives), he was hanged at Proctor's Ledge on 19 August 1692.

Over the last 65 years, various researchers have been discovering new details about George Burroughs’ family and printing corrections, most notably in articles published in The American Genealogist. So, I compiled all that data so George can be placed properly with his parents, wives, and children.
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Was famous Patriot and printer Isaiah Thomas (1749-1831) related to a victim of the 1692 Salem WItch Trials?
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Was Rev. Cotton Mather related to a fellow minister and Harvard graduate hanged at Proctor's Ledge during the 1692 Salem Witch Trials?
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In case you missed it, here are the links to the excellent symposium for the 325th anniversary of the Salem Witch Trials.
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Cotton Mather and the Six Degrees of Separation
Cotton Mather (1663-1728) “Conspicuous” on horseback, Cotton Mather (1663-1728)
attended the hanging of fellow minister and Harvard graduate George Burroughs
(1650-1692), found guilty at the Salem witch trials. Called the ringleader of
witches, Burroughs’ p...
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Remembering Salem: Symposium on the Lessons and Legacy of 1692
One of the reasons why the Salem witch trials of 1692 still
resonate today is the quest to understand why it happened. Plenty of theories
abound to answer that question. We’re still trying to learn the lessons. On June 10, 2017, the 325 th anniversary of th...
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Using the Essex Institute Historical Collections
Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., circa 1910s The Essex Institute of Salem, Massachusetts, was formed in 1848 by the merger of the Essex Historical Society and the Essex County Natural History Society. This literary, historical, and scientific society had a de...
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I love it when someone has an unusual first name, especially with a common last name. This is a great post for telling you the unraveling process.
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Using restitution lists from the 1692 Salem witch trials to rebuild Dorcas Hoar’s family
After the Salem witch trials were over and the victims were
released from prison, some families petitioned the government for restitution and reversal of attainder. These records are useful to rebuilding families. 
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Dorcas Hoar was reprimanded by her minister and caught on the wrong side of the law, so it's no surprise that as a widow she was vulnerable to accusations of witchcraft. But were they really wrong in 1692?
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