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Premier Health Center
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Tip Tuesday - Illiotibial Band Syndrome: Illiotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is one of the most common causes of knee pain, particularly in individuals involved in endurance sports. It accounts for up to 12% of running injuries and up to 24% of cycling injuries. ITBS is typically managed conservatively through physical therapy and temporary activity modification. Click here for more information on Illiotibial Band Syndrome http://l.ptclinic.com/2dBDzA5
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Exercise leads to many improvements for patients with shoulder pain: Approximately half of shoulder pain patients are treated by a physical therapist Shoulder pain is very common, with some reports claiming that as many as 26% of adults currently have it to some degree. About half of all patients with shoulder pain are referred to a physical therapist and treated with exercise therapy and massage. Despite the fact that both of these treatments are commonly used, there are no high-quality studies that have evaluated if adding massage to exercise leads to additional improvements. Based on this, a powerful study called a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) was conducted that investigated the addition of massage to an exercise program for shoulder pain. 80 patients randomly assigned to one of two groups Patients with shoulder pain were recruited and assessed for inclusion. Eighty were accepted and randomly assigned to either the exercise-only or exercise and massage group. Patients in the exercise-only group were led through an exercise program by a physical therapist with seven treatment sessions over five weeks. The physical therapist demonstrated the exercises and provided feedback, and patients were instructed to continue their exercises at home afterwards. Patients in the massage and exercise group underwent the same exercise program, plus 10-15 minutes of soft tissue massage from the physical therapist over seven sessions. All patients were assessed for pain, disability, and range of motion (ROM) before the intervention, one week afterwards, and 12 weeks afterwards. Exercise alone may be sufficient for should pain treatment Results showed that both groups improved in pain and disability to a level that would be considered worthwhile by patients. There was no difference between groups for disability or ROM, but the exercise-only group experienced a slightly greater improvement in pain compared to the exercise and massage group. This suggests that the massage did not lead to any additional benefits for patients compared to exercise alone. Massage therapy is an important component of physical therapy and has been found to be effective in treating many other conditions, and is considered more effective than no treatment for shoulder pain; however, when combined with exercise, it appears massage does not add to overall benefits. For this reason, and also because exercise is a more active intervention, exercise therapy should be regarded as the treatment-of-choice for patients with shoulder pain. -As reported in the May '15 issue of the Physical Therapy http://l.ptclinic.com/2dyxmF9
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Happy Physical Therapy Month!: Happy Physical Therapy Month to our wonderful patients! http://l.ptclinic.com/2d3Yjgt
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Recipe Wednesday - Strawberry Banana Yogurt Parfait: Looks good AND tastes good!Click here for this simple recipe! http://bit.ly/2dkAyE0
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Tip Tuesday - Pain: Pain is one of the most common symptoms that may lead someone to seek the help of a physical therapist or other health care professional. Click here for more information on Pain http://bit.ly/2dhgouA
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Meme Monday: Your physical therapist has had an incredible education and will treat your needs well! For more information, click here! http://bit.ly/2de3v4r
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Patients with lasting LBP often have weak muscles around hip: Variety of exercise interventions typically recommended for these patients Low back pain (LBP) has recently become the largest cause of disability throughout the world. There are many ways in which LBP can be treated, but current guidelines show strong evidence to support exercise as one of the best treatments available. Despite the fact that exercise therapy is known to be effective, it's still not clear exactly which types of exercises are best for people with chronic (long-lasting) LBP. Treatment decisions for these patients are based on the physical therapist's evaluation and usually tend to include strengthening the abdominal and lower back muscles, but one alternative is to focus on the muscles surrounding the hips, too. It's possible that weakness of these muscles may be common in LBP patients and may therefore need to be addressed, but it's not clear how many of these patients experience this. Therefore, a study was conducted to assess the prevalence of hip muscle weakness and tenderness of the hip and lower back in patients with chronic LBP. Large group of LBP patients matched with healthy subjects A group of 151 patients with chronic LBP were invited and agreed to participate. They were then matched with 75 healthy control subjects, who did not have a history of more than three months of LBP. All participants were then examined for muscle strength of numerous muscles in and around the hip, including the gluteus medius (outside of hip), gluteus maximus (largest of hip muscles) and the tensor fasciae latae (TFL, located in thigh and related to gluteus maximus). Tenderness, or the reproduction of patients' pain, was also measured. Gluteus medius weakness common in many LBP patients Results showed that patients with chronic LBP displayed a few signs of hip muscle dysfunction, including gluteus medius weakness and tenderness of both gluteal muscles. Upon further analysis, it was found that the gluteus medius muscle weakness actually contributed to patients' chronic LBP. Based on these findings, it's possible that physical therapy programs that focus on strengthening these weak muscles can lead to greater benefits with better overall outcomes. Therefore, physical therapists should be sure to consider gluteus medius strength and address it when it's weak to improve their interventions and reduce pain more efficiently for these patients. -As reported in the May '15 issue of the European Spine Journal http://bit.ly/2d6dVmC
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Therapeutic Thursdays - Skiing Preparation Program: Before you do these or any other exercises, consult your physical therapist. Click here for this helpful video: Skiing Preparation Program! http://bit.ly/2d2TOpA
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Tip Tuesday - Knee Pain: Knee pain can be caused by disease or injury. Knee pain can restrict movement, affect muscle control in the sore leg, and reduce the strength and endurance of the muscles that support the knee. Click here for more information on Knee Pain http://bit.ly/2cWpgpf
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Recipe Wednesday - Chayote Salad With Lemony Hot Sauce: Ready to turn the heat up with this healthy dish?Click here for this yummy recipe! http://bit.ly/2cF55ft
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