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Ahmed Fasih
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68 followers
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Referendum president. In for one.

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The Sichuan basin in China, home of many great cultures and events. Texture shaded elevation—effectively, `ifft2(ifftshift(sqrt(fx.^2 + fy.^2).^0.5 .* fftshift(fft2(elevation))))` in Matlab, see http://textureshading.com for more—with data from http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~chgis/data/chgis/downloads/v4/datasets/archive/datalist.html#dem We hung up all our maps in the basement so when I'm walking the baby to sleep down there, I think of all kinds of talks to write and software to make and visualizations to dream of.
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“One dude sat down one day and made up the Korean alphabet…”!

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Me at 1am slinging FRP'ed JS, with a side of RethinkDB, GD X Taeyang providing the accompaniment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZRb1we80kM
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MRW I've just fix a bug and my colleague reports it. Including the throwing keyboard and boogieing.

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Gorged on mulberries: delicious raw food from a tree. The wonders of the earth.
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+Anthony Lauder Regarding your talk at the Polyglot Conference in 2013 (Budapest, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2X7XTui58Qs) I'm trying to track down where in I.S.P. Nation's book "Learning Vocabulary in Another Language" he talks about *working memory* and the benefits thereof that you quote (that polyglots' skill in guessing is derived from a more powerful working memory, enabling them to notice, process, and guess things better). I see on pages 58--60 that Nation reviews some studies about phonological short-term memory that suggest it's useful in the initial stages of learning languages (L1 or L2), but I'm having a hard time tracking down references for working memory use among polyglots. Any suggestions? Thanks!

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"mice born by caesarean section, which hosted different microbes from mice born vaginally, were significantly more anxious and had symptoms of depression. The animals’ inability to pick up their mothers’ vaginal microbes during birth — the first bacteria that they would normally encounter — may cause lifelong changes in mental health" --- this is science people: question everything you know, all the time, because at any time, some obscure person might stumble onto little connection that changes everything.

鬱. High school kanji in Japan. Apparently fully-formed during the Warring States period of China >2200 years ago. What more need be said... http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?characterInput=%E9%AC%B1

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