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Chun Hua Catherine Dong
Chun Hua Catherine Dong is a Visual Artist working in Performance, Photography, and Video. She is the recipient of Franklin Furnace Award for contemporary avant-garde art in New York.
Chun Hua Catherine Dong is a Visual Artist working in Performance, Photography, and Video. She is the recipient of Franklin Furnace Award for contemporary avant-garde art in New York.
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“State of Grace” consists of 15 pieces of performance-based photographs that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. In summer in 2013, I revisited China and walked three days in the village where I was born to seek out shadows and conners to conceal myself, and I stayed there as long I could.
(photo credit: Qu Chang)
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“State of Grace” consists of 15 pieces of performance-based photographs that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. In summer in 2013, I revisited China and walked three days in the village where I was born to seek out shadows and conners to conceal myself, and I stayed there as long I could.
(photo credit: Qu Chang)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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Skin Deep” is a project that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. I translate the word “ shame (to cover)” to a cultural symbol by wrapping my face in Chinese silk brocade fabric. This work contains of photographs and a performance video: while standing still and breathing under the fabric in the video, I position myself in front of camera and creates a series of ID-card photographs. The notion of shame – or “losing face” – is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. In fact, if one has “ lost face,” one feels shamed of letting down culture, family, or self. Shame in this work is both social and personal that arise from the awareness of the consequences of my failure in maintaining my identity as a Chinese after living in the West for many years. shame has transformed itself to a visual symbol alive on my skin already. It knits difference into identity and identity into difference, becoming signs of awareness and evidence of inability to escape. (Photo credit: Viku Chan)
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“State of Grace” consists of 15 pieces of performance-based photographs that examines the visual culture of shame in relation to the body, subjects and power in contemporary art. In summer in 2013, I revisited China and walked three days in the village where I was born to seek out shadows and conners to conceal myself, and I stayed there as long I could.
(photo credit: Qu Chang)
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