Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Warrick Ball
165 followers -
Postdoc, University of Birmingham
Postdoc, University of Birmingham

165 followers
About
Posts

Post has shared content
Hurricane Season Animated
Video Credit: M. R. Radcliff (USRA) et al., NASA's GSFC, SVS; Music: Elapsing Time by C. Telford & R. A. Navarro (ASCAP)
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap171127.html

Where do hurricanes go? To better understand dangerous storms, NASA compiled data from several satellites into a supercomputer simulation of this past year's hurricane season. Specifically, the featured video shows how smoke (white), sea salt (blue), and dust (brown) tracked from 2017 August through October across the northern half of Earth's Western Hemisphere. These aerosols usefully trace sometimes invisible winds. In the midst of the many mesmerizing flows, hurricanes can be seen swirling across the Atlantic Ocean on the right. Some of these hurricanes lashed islands and coastal regions in North America before dissipating in the northern Atlantic. Studying this year's weather patterns may bolster more accurate storm forecasts as soon as next year.
2017 November 27
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This is brilliant on so many levels. I bow before the creative genius of DoodleChaos.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"There's a lot of vision going on and I am not a visionary. ... I'm an engineer. ... I'm perfectly happy with all the people who're walking around and just staring at the clouds and looking at the stars and saying I want to go there, but I'm looking at the ground and I want to fix the pothole that's right in front of me before I fall in."

Twenty minutes with the name behind the core software that runs on every Android device, most web servers, and I expect nearly all supercomputers and data centres. For some reason I found this interview fascinating, probably because Linus Torvalds comes across honestly as the complete antithesis of the showmanship that now pervades the outward-facing world of technology.

Also, I recognised his "poor taste" example as a linked list but didn't see the code long enough to digest the "good taste" alternative. (Now Googling...)
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Haven't had anything from the Flickr Blog in a while. Hope this makes up for it.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Okay, they're seriously going to town on the artists' impressions with this one...
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
I missed this APOD earlier. Watch as a series of satellites, all piled up in geostationary orbit, buzz by on the highway in the sky.
Geostationary Highway through Orion
Image Credit & Copyright: James A. DeYoung
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170116.html

Put a satellite in a circular orbit about 42,000 kilometers from the center of the Earth and it will orbit once in 24 hours. Because that matches Earth's rotation period, it is known as a geosynchronous orbit. If that orbit is also in the plane of the equator, the satellite will hang in the sky over a fixed location in a geostationary orbit. As predicted in the 1940s by futurist Arthur C. Clarke, geostationary orbits are in common use for communication and weather satellites, a scenario now well-known to astroimagers. Deep images of the night sky made with telescopes that follow the stars can also pick up geostationary satellites glinting in sunlight still shining far above the Earth's surface. Because they all move with the Earth's rotation against the background of stars, the satellites leave trails that seem to follow a highway across the celestial landscape. The phenomenon was captured last month in this video showing several satellites in geostationary orbit crossing the famous Orion Nebula.
2017 January 16
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
You should be a bit careful with incredible looking photos of the Earth and Milky Way: there are fakes about. But this is the real deal, and it's stunning.
Space Station Vista: Planet and Galaxy
Image Credit: +NASA, JSC, ESRS
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170118.html

If you could circle the Earth aboard the International Space Station, what might you see? Some amazing vistas, one of which was captured in this breathtaking picture in mid-2015. First, visible at the top, are parts of the space station itself including solar panels. Just below the station is the band of our Milky Way Galaxy, glowing with the combined light of billions of stars, but dimmed in patches by filaments of dark dust. The band of red light just below the Milky Way is airglow -- Earth's atmosphere excited by the Sun and glowing in specific colors of light. Green airglow is visible below the red. Of course that's our Earth below its air, with the terminator between day and night visible near the horizon. As clouds speckle the planet, illumination from a bright lightning bolt is seen toward the lower right. Between work assignments, astronauts from all over the Earth have been enjoying vistas like this from the space station since the year 2000.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
An interesting history of the Fahrenheit scale (assuming it's true, which I haven't verified).
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Not sure I like the music but this is a fantastic look inside the International Space Station. (via APOD)
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded