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Rob 'drtorq' Reilly
American Consultant, Engineer, DIYer, Hacker, Writer, Speaker and All-Around Renaissance Man
American Consultant, Engineer, DIYer, Hacker, Writer, Speaker and All-Around Renaissance Man
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Take a look at my aNewDomain.net story about my Hummingboard SlideCam project.
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The hot-rod Hummingboard, with a hacked antique 486 heatsink and powered USB hub. I ran this rig to show my slides (using LibreOffice Impress) at OSCON 2014. I used a Logitech C310 Webcam to show live views of the various microcontroller boards, during the talk. The Hummingboard is made by Solid-Run.
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What's Next For The RasPi Phone?

Everybody is excited about the DIY Raspberry Pi Phone. Rightly, so. Why should the carriers and big name cell phone companies have all the fun. Hacking hardware is cool again.

The device uses off-the-shelf components, that you can easily purchase through Sparkfun, Adafruit, and other outlets. BTW, what does it even mean to have Ethernet and HDMI ports on a cell phone.

Even more recently, the Banana Pi board, has appeared on the market, for a reported 75 bucks or so.

So, what would happen if you combined a cell module (like the RasPi Phone) with the Banana Pi? Using the $150 HDMI display, in your car, you could watch Youtube videos over the cell network, while you drive!

We're getting a little bit away from the IoTs. But are we?

I'm at 10 GB/mo. on my carrier's family plan, now. I think it's just a matter of time before we effectively get "no caps" on cell data for a per month fee. Bandwidth is still iffy, but it certainly lends itself well to extreme mobility. What about remote X apps, portable servers, and "compute" devices. The automotive industry seems pretty interested.

And, don't even get me started on satellite Ethernet married to a RasPi or BananaPi.

Sure, this "kind" of tech has been around for years in the form of small-footprint X86 and ARM boards. There's never been such a variety, at very favorable price points, with the capability of easily running Linux and OSS.

Almost all of it is off-the-shelf that can be stitched together with Linux/OSS and maybe just a pinch of programming.

What could we do with those kinds of capability, particularly on portable or battery power?
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