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Jeff Cogswell
430 followers -
jQuery/JavaScript teacher, software engineer with 20+ yrs exp. Node.js + MongoDB is the future.
jQuery/JavaScript teacher, software engineer with 20+ yrs exp. Node.js + MongoDB is the future.

430 followers
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Jeff's posts

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After a long break, I'm getting back into doing artwork! This is a charcoal portrait I did years ago. Right now I couldn't do this because my skills have slipped after too much non-use, but my plan is to get back to this level. I can do it!
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People have made some really cool drawing apps for Android that let you do this kind of stuff!
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I've been using Microsoft's Visual Studio "Code" code editor. A few thoughts: (1) It isn't Visual Studio. It's just a code editor. I'm not sure why they even call it Visual Studio. (2) It's actually quite good for a code editor. I'm using it on Linux and it's working great. (3) It's written from the ground up in... JavaScript! (4) It runs in a sandboxed version of... Chrome! Yes, Chrome, which is not made by Microsoft. (5) Because it's a browser app, it needs server code. The server code is a local node.js implementation running. Interesting. (6) They actually give you access to the Chrome dev tools, so you can check out JavaScript and CSS in the browser.

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Learning #JavaScript and wondering if you have what it takes for a #job? Check out my list of the bare minimum.  http://insights.dice.com/2015/06/04/javascript-you-need-to-know-for-a-job/

Over the years I've seen a lot of young programmers list on their resume every possible programming language they've ever been exposed to, but not mention that it's only brief exposure. (I did the same when I was in my early 20s.) This is a bad idea on multiple levels. First, people with experience immediately doubt it when they see it. And second, unless you've worked full time, professionally using a programming language for at least a couple years, there's no way you can be anywhere close to an expert in it. For awhile I did mention "brief exposure" on some languages on my resume, but in terms of landing a job, that does nothing. But therein lies a fundamental problem recent college grads face: How do you get experience without actually having experience? And I'm not sure what a good answer is, other than it just takes time to truly build up your resume.

A couple years ago I interviewed for a job for a programming position (which I was ultimately offered but turned down) and during the interview somebody asked me a question I've never gotten. She knew that I had written a book about C++ when I was only 25 years old, back in 1993. Her question was: "Why do you feel you were qualified to write a book about C++ at such a young age." I paused a minute and then started laughing and said, "That is a GREAT question! Nobody has ever asked me that before. And the truth is, I was NOT qualified." I then talked about things that I missed in the book, and things I simply got wrong. But what I think was really interesting was the discussion that followed: The people interviewing me expressed the sentiment that often people think that those of us who write books and articles do so because somebody somewhere has singled us out as the world's foremost expert on the topic and too often it's obvious we aren't, which upsets readers. But that is not the case. I'm an expert in certain areas, but I've written about many other topics as well. What I am an expert in is communicating ideas, or, simply put: TEACHING. I'm a teacher. That is what I do. And I'm also a pretty good software developer, and perhaps an expert in a couple technologies such as node.js and, to a certain extent, C++ (after all these years!). But other technologies I study and write about, often sharing how I learned the technology as what tripped me up, and the pitfalls I encountered, hoping others might benefit. But knowing people have the misconception that somebody thinks the author is a world renowned expert, it explains why some people feel compelled to post nasty comments after articles, claiming one small error totally invalidates the article, or to write that the author is, in fact, an idiot, and so on. (And rarely do the editors who picked us think we're experts. We were selected because we can write.) I'm not writing to proclaim expertise; I'm writing to share knowledge and, if people find errors or disagree, then I look forward to constructive discussion and, hopefully, learning from the actual experts who are out there through their constructive comments, and all of us sharing with each other. That's the real goal here.

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Jeff Cogswell commented on a post on Blogger.
Hi, the latest source versions (0.10.26) seem to break. I can build, but the node binary freezes when I run it. I reverted to an earlier one (0.10.10) and it works fine. I don't know where in between the problem started, but if I get time, I'll see if I can find exactly which it was and what the difference was. Meanwhile, here's the direct link to the version that worked for me. http://www.nodejs.org/dist/v0.10.10/node-v0.10.10.tar.gz

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Wow, Google is really giving me fits today! I tried to post a comment in reply to a Blogger.com post, and when I clicked Submit, I saw this message: "We're sorry, but we were unable to complete your request. The following errors were found: Input error: Memcache value is null for FormRestoration"

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My new training site! Courses forming. Check it out! :-)
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