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Mathnasium of Westwood
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Just like “going to a gym,” students attend Mathnasium. Mathnasium instructors check progress along the way to make sure kids truly understand and retain the concepts they have been taught. The results are amazing. Kids will see measurable changes in attitude, confidence and school progress.
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The triangle at left lies on a flat surface and is pushed at the top vertex. The length of the congruent sides does not change, but the angle between the two congruent sides will increase, and the base will stretch. Initially, the area of the triangle will increase, but eventually the area will decrease, continuing until the triangle collapses.

What is the maximum area achieved during this process? And, what is the length of the base when this process is used to create a different triangle whose area is the same as the triangle above?
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Relate maths content to familiar experiences. This helps your child to see a real-life purpose for the maths. This could include:

• seeing an area of one hectare as roughly equivalent to the area of two rugby league football fields
• comparing similar products that are packaged differently to work out the best value for money
• using formulas in spreadsheets to strengthen an understanding of algebra and number concepts
• using plans to sketch how a structure might look from different perspectives
• noting the angle that cars have been parked to the kerb.
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Thank you to all of the students who joined us for the Annual National TriMathlon this past Sunday! It was a huge success and we had over 25 students registered here locally for the event, while there were thousands of additional students across the country competing at their local Mathnasium center! We hope you had as much fun as we did putting your math skills to work in a fun environment!
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When your child works out a maths problem, such as adding the total when two dice have been rolled, ask them how they did it.

What we've found through years of research is that even young children have quite sophisticated thinking strategies for solving maths problems. We need to communicate to them that their ways of thinking are just as important as finding out the answer.

"When you ask your child, ‘How did you get that?' they may at first say, ‘I don't know', but if they realise there is an expectation that they will need to explain the way they do maths, they will start thinking about it. The more they think about how they did something, the more it might make sense to them – it really contributes to that meaning-making process."
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Building a strong math foundation from childhood will ensure a successful academic career for kids. Most kids grasp things easily, but some kids’ take more time to understand a math concept. It is quite challenging for parents to teach math thoroughly to their child. Math is fun to learn, but it takes a lot of patience and practice to master the subject. Every parent tries to develop their kids’ math skills in some way or the other as at this stage they learn things quickly. Here some important tips are discussed to make math learning interesting for your kid.

1. Include math into daily life activities: Give some candies to your kids and ask them to distribute equally among friends. Later, ask them how many candies they have distributed and how many are left with them.

2. Make math a fun and a real experience: Give them a feel of numbers by asking them to count the numbers of animals or birds they see in a zoo. This will improve your kids’ number sense.

3. Help your child in recognizing patterns: Give your child different objects and ask them to identify the shapes. This type of activity will develop your kids’ spatial ability and enables them to visualize objects correctly.

4. Teach your child about measurement: Show a wall clock to your child and explain them about counting hours and minutes. This will develop the child’s brain to think different types of measurement like time measurement, length, height, width and weight.

5. Help your child in organizing objects in a series: With your child’s toys, try to segregate them based on a logical manner like a smaller toy to a bigger toy. This will help your child in understanding sorting techniques.

6. Reward your kid with a prize: Take a small quiz about numbers and if they answer correctly give them a small gift. This idea will tempt them to make efforts to learn more things and faster.

7. Oral discussion: Explain the details of how to do the calculation. In other words, explain them what are the different ways of solving the problem. Also encourage them by asking if they have some different ways to solve a math problem.
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Mr Benson arrives in Memphis and bumps into the candyman who has 20 orange jellybeans and 20 black jellybeans. The candyman will let him distribute the jellybeans between two sacks, labeled "Heads" and "Tails." After he distributes the beans, he flips a fair coin and choose a bean at random from the corresponding sack.

How should Mr. Benson distribute the beans between the two sacks to maximize his odds of getting a black one?
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Often you hear “educated” people making remarks like “Oh, I was never any good at maths myself in school.” Such comments, along with the publicity given to poor Leaving Cert results in maths, give students the idea that maths is difficult or that it is acceptable to be a low achiever in maths. The comments also give the false impression that maths is something you’re either good at or you’re not. Parents are in a good position to let their children know that solving maths problems can be satisfying, that anyone can be good at maths, that knowledge of maths is helpful in life generally, and that it opens up doors to some exciting career options. Mathnasium of Westwood can help! For enrollment, call today at: 310-475-2222.
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Work to Understand the Principles. You can pass a history class by simply memorizing a set of dates, names and events. You will find, however, that in order to pass a math class you will need to do more than just memorize a set of formulas. While there is certainly a fair amount of memorization of formulas in a math class you need to do more. You need to understand how to USE the formulas and that is often far different from just memorizing them.

Some formulas have restrictions on them that you need to know in order to correctly use them. For instance, in order to use the quadratic formula you must have the quadratic in standard form first. You need to remember this or you will often get the wrong answer!

Other formulas are very general and require you to identify the parts in the problem that correspond to parts in the formula. If you don’t understand how the formula works and the principle behind it, it can often be very difficult to use the formula. For example, in a calculus course it’s not terribly difficult to memorize the formula for integration by parts for integrals. However, if you don’t understand how to actually use the formula and identify the appropriate parts of the integral you will find the memorized formula worthless.
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Find the missing number. #Math #Mathisfun #Mathnasium #BrainTeaser
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