Profile

Cover photo
Bruce Baugh
Lives in Seattle, WA
2,545 followers|4,704,104 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosVideos

Stream

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Showed this periodic table of emission line spectra in my talk - was a big hit. http://rainbowkitteh.tumblr.com/image/83032827266 … #sdss16 · Embedded image. 12:08 PM - 26 Jun 2016. 145 Retweets247 Likes. Reply to @realscientists ...
1 comment on original post
3
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
I have a bunch more to write about this game, but I'm going slowly thanks to migraine and such, and I can't wait to tell people about one of the best things about it. A more detailed reading and comments on strengths (which are multiple) and weaknesses (which are more prominent than they should be) will follow as soon as may be.

This is a sic-fantasy game. It's the 31st century, other-dimensional horrors stalk the world thanks to a bit of archeology gone really bad, and three massive AIs protect the world in their different ways. The PCs are heroes working for one or another of the three, protecting the remaining sanctuaries and sticking it to the bad guys.

This is the cool part. The game uses Fate Accelerated (my personal favorite version of Fate Core)...but the AIs have each given their agents/servants different mixes of abilities on top of the baseline approach of Human, for empathy, rapport, and the like. So you have one set of approaches if you're a clone outfitted with super tech, a different set if you're a psychic projection of a sleeping person, and a third if you're a cyborg with personality implants.

Each is clearly described in terms of its principles, and has bullet points for each of the four actions. F'r instance:

Log-In
Connected to the global net, you receive information from Nirvana, whether they are information or scans of the area, every time you need. Nirvana's database has all of human knowledge.
* Overcome: If you need information, data, or satellite scans, Nirvana can do them in a few seconds.
* Create an advantage: proper information is the key to solve any problem. Nirvana can send you the Sector 65 map if you need it, or the Anti-contagious agent composition instructions that you require.
* Attack: the right information at the right time can be more valid than weapons.
* Defend: surprise them with something they do not know.

Faith
The Voice talks to you and always gives you advice, you have to believe her. Follow the path that she suggests and defend humanity from the Hekath menace.
* Overcome: the Voice guides you in your choices and gives you the right suggestions. The end justifies the means.
* Create an advantage: the Voice knows how to make the most out of a situation. That Door can withstand the attack even if sometimes gaining an advantage requires suffering. You will use that LostH as a human shield.
* Attack: use your faith to find the hidden enemy.
* Defend: your faith is firm and pure, the mantras protect you from the things that darken your mind.

Mighty
You have the strength of ten men, what is impossible to many is normal to you.
* Overcome: you will damage something, but you will arrive at your goal.
* Create an advantage: you can Shred the door that blocks your way or Easily bend the bars that prevent your escape.
* Attack: throw a vehicle or use a beam as a weapon, whatever happens you will damage your target and those around you.
* Defend: remove that piece of the wall, if you need a shield. Easy!

This is one of those SPROING! moments for me. I can imagine it helping a lot with, say, doing Vampire in FAE, with clans providing some approaches and character interests providing some. Love it.

http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/185979/Evolution-Pulse--English-Edition
Evolution Pulse - English Edition - Close your eyes and imagine hyper-technological and massive huge cities that expand all over the globe’s surface.
18
8
Russell Collins's profile photoDaniele Di Rubbo's profile photoJerry Sköld's profile photoBruce Baugh's profile photo
17 comments
 
beams
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
For everyone - including me - who's mourning losses, individual and collective, loved ones, trusted friends, good acquaintances, members of your community in a zillion different ways, some music.

John Rutter is a life-long atheist, and this isn't his attempt to affirm a particular doctrine. What interests him is the ways music work around and beyond the words, all the elements that combine to produce a state of being. Not preaching, so much as an invitation to share, in this case about our grief, our wishes for those we've lost and for ourselves, the yearning for a foundation on which to stand in the wake.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP7oYnXfyh0
6
Jerry Sköld's profile photoBruce Baugh's profile photo
2 comments
 
You're welcome.
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Fate Accelerated Edition (FAE)  - 
 
Crossposted from my individual stream....

Nitrate City is the new World of Adventure supplement for Fate Core. It's 56 pages long, written by Doselle Young and +Bill White, illustrated by Ron Randall and Sebastijan Camagajevac, and I have it in PDF. It's wonderful, and I'm going to be enthusing rather a lot here.

It's set in 1950s Southern California, ten years after film-inspired people and things started becoming real. Nitrate City is what people call Los Angeles these days. Victor Stitch, a Frankenstein's Monster-style revenant, is the crime boss of bosses; the LA police department has the Night Squad, composed of cops who are also monsters of various sorts. Sodium lights more or less suppress the Flicker Effect that keeps bringing new things into existence, but you can't blanket a whole metropolitan area in sodium lights overnight. (You can protect some key vulnerable areas like film studios and the Disenchanted Kingdom that was once Disneyland.)

If the setting were all the book had, I'd be enthusiastic. It's great fun in its own right, and in an odd sort of way it captures a crucial element in Angeleno psychology, the way so many people feel like "their" LA is at risk from intrusive, alien, perhaps incomprehensible "them"s of various sorts. Doelle and Bill have set their priorities smartly, sketching out a variety of neighborhoods and detailing key individuals and kinds of characters to use in bringing places to life.

But this book also brings a bit of sheer mechanical genius.

It uses Fate Accelerated-like approaches. There are just four of them, and the book calls them "cinematic approaches", which is good since that's what they are: Action, Comedy, Drama, and Horror. FAE's approaches rate your character in terms of how they go about dealing with challenges. These rate them in terms of what's at stake for them in challenges. Which is to say...

You roll Action when what's at stake is whether they can power through resistance, and whether force is what's called for. Comedy is for when the question is whether your character's the butt of a joke - think of being caught in a Harold Lloyd moment of impending disaster, or a Marx Brothers social interaction, or a Jackie Chan fight. Drama is for when it matters whether your character's taken as sincere and driven. Horror is for keeping cool under mental and emotional threats to a character's priorities, sense of what's possible and real, and so on.

"Genius. Sheer, unadulterated genius", as Wile E. Coyote said.

There are, of course, times when you want to know in detail how your character and the challenges they face rate in terms of means and methods. Plenty of RPGs do that. This feels like a wonderful extension of what FAE does and not many other games do, putting motives and drives in the spotlight. Approaches and stunts serve, as they do generally in Fate games, to give some boundaries to what it is characters can do. But I absolutely love giving the question "How does your character think about this situation?" such priority.

As I read, I thought about how other genres-come-to-life might be rated for use in the setting. Sci-fi gets mentioned several times, but film sci-fi would (I think) be covered by the existing cinematic approaches, particularly Action and Drama. Courtroom dramas and romance are mostly Drama. And so on. Horror really is distinctive in being, as David Hartwell liked to put it, a mode rather than a genre in itself. There's room for a Mystery or Investigation approach, but that's about it.

Something the book doesn't discuss explicitly is nonetheless on display in the example characters: they're all fairly close to starting values. Some example seasoned, established individuals are built right on starting points, and even the toughest NPCs aren't wildly beyond. There's room for character advancement, but the book provides implicit encouragement for focusing on evolving aspects and new stunts rather than increasing numerical ratings. Nifty.

So there you go. This is a happy Bruce review. :)

http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/184325/Nitrate-City--A-World-of-Adventure-for-Fate-Core
Nitrate City • A World of Adventure for Fate Core - Nitrate City is a place where elements of Film Noir and classic movie monsters combine with explosive results. It
21
1
Michael Mendoza's profile photoFred Hicks's profile photoTroy Ray's profile photoBruce Baugh's profile photo
8 comments
 
You really can!

I spent time thinking about other approaches. I talked myself into realizing that Investigation is just an emphasis within Action that you'd mark with aspects and stunts. I thought about Magic, for things like urban fantasy, but it seems to me that it is also a function of existing approaches with aspects granting permissions. I love how Fate constructively pushes against my constant temptations toward complication.
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
Jean-Michel Jarre has a second album of collaborations out, called Electronica 2. His roster of collaborators is, once again, impressive: Gary Numan, Hans Zimmer, Cyndi Lauper, and among others, the Pet Shop Boys. Enjoy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKEx25PRA44
5
1
Alan Olsen's profile photo
 
I have both volumes. Enjoying both.
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
2,545 people
joseph browning's profile photo
Haakon Olav Thunestvedt's profile photo
J. Steven York's profile photo
Linh Ngoc's profile photo
Gameaholic's profile photo
James Dillane's profile photo
tawengo games's profile photo
Craig Ty Thompson's profile photo
Joseph Gamblin's profile photo

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
It's too warm. There is lounging. 
23
Brian Griffith's profile photoBruce Baugh's profile photoDymphna C.'s profile photoSally Smith's profile photo
4 comments
 
The paws are still tucked under -- cat hasn't melted yet. Must be the granite helping.
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
Some more music for mourning. Johannes Brahms was a humanist and agnostic; as with John Rutter a century later, he's working with sacred texts for their cultural and personal resonance, for things we know -or simply hope - as true in our experience regardless of what the world happens to be delivering up.

Here's the text, in the original German and translation:

1. Selig sind, die da Leid tragen,
denn sie sollen getröstet werden.
Die mit Tränen säen,
werden mit Freuden ernten.
Sie gehen hin und weinen
und tragen edlen Samen,
und kommen mit Freuden
und bringen ihre Garben

Blessed are they that mourn,
for they shall be comforted.
They who sow in tears,
shall reap in joy.
Go forth and cry,
bearing precious seed,
and come with joy
bearing their sheaves

Humanistic hopes like these, drawing on originally religious sources, play a huge part in the history of liberation and reform movements in the European tradition. There's often someone to say "This can be true for the living; we don't have to wait; this world is always already becoming the next world."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOnSQzIPXa4
3
Aaron Dawson's profile photo
 
"Gloomy Sunday", both Rezso's original and Billie Holiday's cover have been my fallback in darker times.

Here's to hoping that the time for mourning passes quickly for you and you find the peace that lets us carry on. 
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Discussion  - 
 
I''m mostly an Apple user in my computing, but I recently got the basic Kindle Fire. Having the Deck of Fate app on it is very neat, of course. Is there any equivalent to Fate Folio for Android?
2
Brian Boring's profile photoFábio Emilio Costa's profile photo
2 comments
 
AFAIK, no 
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nitrate City is the new World of Adventure supplement for Fate Core. It's 56 pages long, written by Doselle Young and +Bill White, illustrated by Ron Randall and Sebastijan Camagajevac, and I have it in PDF. It's wonderful, and I'm going to be enthusing rather a lot here.

It's set in 1950s Southern California, ten years after film-inspired people and things started becoming real. Nitrate City is what people call Los Angeles these days. Victor Stitch, a Frankenstein's Monster-style revenant, is the crime boss of bosses; the LA police department has the Night Squad, composed of cops who are also monsters of various sorts. Sodium lights more or less suppress the Flicker Effect that keeps bringing new things into existence, but you can't blanket a whole metropolitan area in sodium lights overnight. (You can protect some key vulnerable areas like film studios and the Disenchanted Kingdom that was once Disneyland.)

If the setting were all the book had, I'd be enthusiastic. It's great fun in its own right, and in an odd sort of way it captures a crucial element in Angeleno psychology, the way so many people feel like "their" LA is at risk from intrusive, alien, perhaps incomprehensible "them"s of various sorts. Doelle and Bill have set their priorities smartly, sketching out a variety of neighborhoods and detailing key individuals and kinds of characters to use in bringing places to life.

But this book also brings a bit of sheer mechanical genius.

It uses Fate Accelerated-like approaches. There are just four of them, and the book calls them "cinematic approaches", which is good since that's what they are: Action, Comedy, Drama, and Horror. FAE's approaches rate your character in terms of how they go about dealing with challenges. These rate them in terms of what's at stake for them in challenges. Which is to say...

You roll Action when what's at stake is whether they can power through resistance, and whether force is what's called for. Comedy is for when the question is whether your character's the butt of a joke - think of being caught in a Harold Lloyd moment of impending disaster, or a Marx Brothers social interaction, or a Jackie Chan fight. Drama is for when it matters whether your character's taken as sincere and driven. Horror is for keeping cool under mental and emotional threats to a character's priorities, sense of what's possible and real, and so on.

"Genius. Sheer, unadulterated genius", as Wile E. Coyote said.

There are, of course, times when you want to know in detail how your character and the challenges they face rate in terms of means and methods. Plenty of RPGs do that. This feels like a wonderful extension of what FAE does and not many other games do, putting motives and drives in the spotlight. Approaches and stunts serve, as they do generally in Fate games, to give some boundaries to what it is characters can do. But I absolutely love giving the question "How does your character think about this situation?" such priority.

As I read, I thought about how other genres-come-to-life might be rated for use in the setting. Sci-fi gets mentioned several times, but film sci-fi would (I think) be covered by the existing cinematic approaches, particularly Action and Drama. Courtroom dramas and romance are mostly Drama. And so on. Horror really is distinctive in being, as David Hartwell liked to put it, a mode rather than a genre in itself. There's room for a Mystery or Investigation approach, but that's about it.

Something the book doesn't discuss explicitly is nonetheless on display in the example characters: they're all fairly close to starting values. Some example seasoned, established individuals are built right on starting points, and even the toughest NPCs aren't wildly beyond. There's room for character advancement, but the book provides implicit encouragement for focusing on evolving aspects and new stunts rather than increasing numerical ratings. Nifty.

So there you go. This is a happy Bruce review. :)

http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/184325/Nitrate-City--A-World-of-Adventure-for-Fate-Core
Nitrate City • A World of Adventure for Fate Core - Nitrate City is a place where elements of Film Noir and classic movie monsters combine with explosive results. It
13
1
Topher “All-Demon-Flirt” Gerkey's profile photoBrandon Blackmoor's profile photoBen Monroe's profile photo
3 comments
 
It's like it was written just for me. I'm going to use it to run my "the Fast and the Frankensteins" game. It was going to be a modern game, but setting it in the 50's with teenage monster hot rod hooligans sounds even better.

Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
Rockalypse Leverage action: remixing Muzak with helpful subliminal messages, and sneaking into target buildings to swap it in. Success with style on the infiltration = the laser dance from Ocean's Twelve. Success at cost = an original Scooby Doo musical sequence. 
5
Add a comment...

Bruce Baugh

Shared publicly  - 
 
Oh, yes. Jean-Michel Jarre and Hans Zimmer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fi0cQ0Qi6do
5
Add a comment...
Bruce's Collections
People
Have them in circles
2,545 people
joseph browning's profile photo
Haakon Olav Thunestvedt's profile photo
J. Steven York's profile photo
Linh Ngoc's profile photo
Gameaholic's profile photo
James Dillane's profile photo
tawengo games's profile photo
Craig Ty Thompson's profile photo
Joseph Gamblin's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Seattle, WA
Previously
Pasadena, CA
Story
Tagline
Generally dismissed as an epiphenomenon
Introduction
Writer, tender of cat, commenter in a digressive mode.
Work
Occupation
Writer
Employment
  • Writer, present
Links
Other profiles