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Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation
558 followers -
Today's care. Tomorrow's cure.®
Today's care. Tomorrow's cure.®

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Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation's posts

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Valentine’s Day is a celebration of love, friendship and commitment. At the Reeve Foundation, we are so fortunate to have such a vast community of supporters who champion our mission on behalf of the millions of individuals living with paralysis. Together, we can make a life-changing impact and provide hope to so many. If that isn't love, what is?

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Clinical trial updates: here are several current studies that hope to improve recovery after spinal cord injury.

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Please join us in celebrating National Mentoring Month by looking for the special content from the Peer & Family Support Program on the Reeve Foundation’s social media platforms with the hashtag. #ReeveMentors

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The holiday season has officially begun! While you are enjoying the holidays and purchasing your last minute gifts, remember the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation as you shop. You can still make an impact and donate to through AmazonSmile without any extra costs.

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Today on #GivingTuesday, your donation doubles. Have twice the impact right now!

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The Reeve Foundation Charitybuzz auction ends tomorrow at 3PM ET. Don't miss out on the amazing experiences that you have a chance on winning! Bid now!

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Jeff Laffond, Reeve Foundation Chairman of the Champions Committee provides six great factors that helps identify accessibility challenges. | via The Hill

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“Everything they did was the embodiment of courage, bravery and strength. Every day was a new fight, a new battle that my parents tackled together," - Will Reeve on his parents, Christopher and Dana, and how they motivated him to tackle the marathon. Support Will and Team Reeve at the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon. | via New York Post

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Research News: A group at the University of California, San Francisco reported in late September that human embryonic stem cells, transplanted to the area of injury in an animal model, integrated functionally in the mouse spinal cord, and differentiated into a cell type that quieted amped-up nerve signals. The result: reduction of pain and improvement of bladder function.

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NRN Spotlight: Learn more about Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute and how individuals like Rob Wudlick began participating in the Activity-Based Locomotor Exercise (ABLE)program. #TodaysCare
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