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Mark Lewis
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Some restrictions may apply. Void where prohibited.

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Mysteries in Fate
Mysteries come up as a common example of stories that are hard to do in Fate.

I'm wondering if it might work to frame a mystery as a Conflict where the stress track represents Ignorance or Obfuscation. The players' investigations are attacks, and inflicting stress reveals a nugget of truth, a piece of evidence, or a new line of investigation. Consequences are Revelations (minor, moderate, major), and Taking Out the mystery means solving it. In the spirit of the Fractal, each exchange in the Mystery Conflict is itself a scene.

I've never tried it because I only just thought of it. Has this come up before? Does anyone think it could work?

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This is freaking brilliant. I'd like to see bigger sites get in on this action, like what happened during the SOPA blackout.
#netneutrality  
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If you don't read xkcd, you should.
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"All programmers are forcing their brains to do things brains were never meant to do in a situation they can never make better, ten to fifteen hours a day, five to seven days a week, and every one of them is slowly going mad."

I'll drink to that.
Programming Sucks
Programming Sucks
stilldrinking.org
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I used to hate unit tests. It was tedious work to write them, and the benefit was never clear, especially when the examples were always testing trivial things like getters and setters. Now I know better.

The value of a unit test is not primarily in the test itself. It's in the underlying assumption that test makes: that the thing you're testing is a unit. It is loosely coupled. It is a good candidate for composition.

In short, unit tests enforce good design, even if you never write them. Merely conceiving of them answers the question, "is this a unit?" That kind of unit testing doesn't require committing to TDD...
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As a web developer, reading James Mickens' final Usenix column was very cathartic for me.
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