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JeffnFaith Johnson
Christian. Married. Living in Tennessee.
Christian. Married. Living in Tennessee.
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Thank you Hamburg, Germany! +Secret Santa The Christmas Card is beautiful.
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It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas! And my goodness I have a ton left to get done! Partylite party at the house tonight... if you can't make it, http://www.Partylite.biz/nevergiveup click shop then on the purple line click host then first name Faith last name Johnson. :)
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If you aren't involved you should be!
Secret Santa is a huge success: The stats so far

This year we had the privilege of getting a beautiful website to make viewing lists easier and the support you have all given each other is overwhelming. 

1,472 wishlists
1,702 reshares of posts
2,056 comments on posts
3,232 unique visitors to the site
5,122 +1s on posts
6,314 page views of the site
7,832 people have Secret Santa in their circles
8,990 people have +1'ed the website/page

It's an amazing accomplishment possible only because of all of you. Keep gifting and spreading the cheer! Christmas is less than 2weeks away ;)
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Worked on getting some decorating done... figure we will have everything finished by Monday. Hope to manage pictures somehow before the kids go on their visits. Its beginning to look a lot like Christmas!
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I love the Helix nebula... it looks like an eye. If i stare at it too long I feel as if I am being watched.
The Helix Nebula: Unraveling at the Seams

A dying star is throwing a cosmic tantrum in this combined image from NASA's +Spitzer Space Telescope and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), which NASA has lent to the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. In death, the star's dusty outer layers are unraveling into space, glowing from the intense ultraviolet radiation being pumped out by the hot stellar core.

This object, called the Helix nebula, lies 650 light-years away, in the constellation of Aquarius. Also known by the catalog number NGC 7293, it is a typical example of a class of objects called planetary nebulae. Discovered in the 18th century, these cosmic works of art were erroneously named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets.

Planetary nebulae are actually the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. These stars spend most of their lives turning hydrogen into helium in massive runaway nuclear fusion reactions in their cores. In fact, this process of fusion provides all the light and heat that we get from our sun. Our sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years.

When the hydrogen fuel for the fusion reaction runs out, the star turns to helium for a fuel source, burning it into an even heavier mix of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Eventually, the helium will also be exhausted, and the star dies, puffing off its outer gaseous layers and leaving behind the tiny, hot, dense core, called a white dwarf. The white dwarf is about the size of Earth, but has a mass very close to that of the original star; in fact, a teaspoon of a white dwarf would weigh as much as a few elephants!

The glow from planetary nebulae is particularly intriguing as it appears surprisingly similar across a broad swath of the spectrum, from ultraviolet to infrared. The Helix remains recognizable at any of these wavelengths, but the combination shown here highlights some subtle differences.

The intense ultraviolet radiation from the white dwarf heats up the expelled layers of gas, which shine brightly in the infrared. GALEX has picked out the ultraviolet light pouring out of this system, shown throughout the nebula in blue, while Spitzer has snagged the detailed infrared signature of the dust and gas in yellow A portion of the extended field beyond the nebula, which was not observed by Spitzer, is from NASA's all-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The white dwarf star itself is a tiny white pinprick right at the center of the nebula.

The brighter purple circle in the very center is the combined ultraviolet and infrared glow of a dusty disk circling the white dwarf (the disk itself is too small to be resolved). This dust was most likely kicked up by comets that survived the death of their star.

Before the star died, its comets, and possibly planets, would have orbited the star in an orderly fashion. When the star ran out of hydrogen to burn, and blew off its outer layers, the icy bodies and outer planets would have been tossed about and into each other, kicking up an ongoing cosmic dust storm. Any inner planets in the system would have burned up or been swallowed as their dying star expanded.

Infrared data from Spitzer for the central nebula is rendered in green (wavelengths of 3.6 to 4.5 microns) and red (8 to 24 microns), with WISE data covering the outer areas in green (3.4 to 4.5 microns) and red (12 to 22 microns). Ultraviolet data from GALEX appears as blue (0.15 to 2.3 microns).

Source: http://earthspacecircle.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-helix-nebula-unraveling-at-seams.html
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