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Bill Ferriter
226 followers -
Teacher, Blogger, Author, Professional Development Provider
Teacher, Blogger, Author, Professional Development Provider

226 followers
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Bill's posts

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Session Resources for Our Students CAN Assess Themselves (S220)

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Session Resources for Digital Tools Can Make Differentiation Doable (S221)

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Session Resources for Creating Purpose Driven Learning Experiences (WS202)

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Bill Ferriter commented on a post on Blogger.
Aaron wrote:

I find it hard to believe that there can be any example of being connected that does not include getting involved and giving back. The question then is how are you giving back and what are the problems that you have faced along the way?

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This is a brilliant statement, Aaron.  

If we were a part of a F2F social group with someone who "never gave back" -- never reached out to start an interaction, never planned a social function, never joined a conversation in an active way -- would we feel "connected" to them? 

For me, the larger concern is the overall health of the places where we share.  The truth is that creating content takes time and energy.  Sharing that content takes more time and energy.  If creators feel like they're not getting anything in return for the time and energy that they invest in that process, isn't it likely that they will stop creating and sharing?  

Being a contributor -- whether that's through giving credit, adding comments, making new posts -- matters because it ensures that the free sharing we've come to associate with social spaces is actually sustainable.  

Any of this make sense?
Bill

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Bill Ferriter commented on a post on Blogger.
When talking about Chris Betcher's thinking, Aaron wrote:  

he explained that in many respects what happens in schools has not necessarily changed. Instead, the friction has been taken away, meaning that what may have taken hours in the past, can now be done in seconds.

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Lots of good thinking in this post, Aaron -- but this is one of the points I wanted to touch on.  So often, we harp about the fact that substitution of practice -- using technology to do something that we've always done without technology -- is bad practice.  

That thinking goes back to Toeffler, who argued that we need to be doing "new things in new ways" with digital tools. 

I hate that line of thinking simply because it is based on the assumption that everything we've ever done in schools needs to be replaced -- that it was worthless. 

The truth is that the skills that matter to kids today -- collaborative problem solving, being able to communicate, managing and evaluating information -- are the same skills that defined the most successful people fifty years ago.  

The difference is that those skills matter to more people today than ever before.  Fifty years ago, you could still live a pretty good life even if you didn't master higher order skills because you could get a manufacturing job.  Today, if you don't master higher order skills, you're stuck with low paying work in the service industry.  

The other difference is that digital tools make it WAY easier to master and to practice with higher order skills.  So the kids who learn to use digital tools well will be more skilled and more efficient than the kids who don't.  

So digital tools matter -- but not because they allow us to replace the things we've always done in the classroom. 

Does this make any sense?
Bill

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Bill Ferriter commented on a post on Blogger.
What's crazy about this, Stump, is that schools do so much to make exposure next to impossible to pull off.  Not only are we in front of students for the majority of our day -- and therefore isolated from our peers -- we're completely slammed during our planning periods, giving us limited time to actually see others in action.

Instead, we spend our time grinding behind closed doors answering email, filling out paperwork, grading papers, planning lessons.  

Such a simple fix and yet so hard to make it happen.

Hope you're well...
Bill
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