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Leah Dodrill
3,556 followers -
Senior Web, New Media. Always living and learning.
Senior Web, New Media. Always living and learning.

3,556 followers
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Leah's posts

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"Not having an opinion means not having an obligation. And not being obligated is one of the sweetest of life’s riches."

Oh, the irony of that statement.

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I'm looking for a DB-25 Serial/Com to USB so I can access an old zip drive. A link to buy would be greatly appreciated!

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Historic Architecture
Gerlinger Hall, University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon

#architectureyesterday : +ARCHITECTURE YESTERDAY - TOMORROW curated by +Edith Kukla
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Someone is going to be a guest on #dancingwiththestars tonight. I'll give you one guess.
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Good Morning Google+  your daily story about art: 03.15
Today is the Ides of March, a day many may recognize as the day that Caesar was murdered in 44BC.  Originally, the Ides of March was just one of many 'Ides' - each month of the Roman Calendar had a day called Ides around the middle of the month.  

The term 'Ides of March' became famous after Shakespeare used it in his play Julius Caesar. In the first act, second scene, a soothsayer cautions Caesar to 'Beware the Ides of March', but is bundled off by Caesar's guards.  So, while some say that the Ides of March is just like any other day, if you look, you can find lists of events that occured on a March 15th that will include horrendous things such as the stabbing of Caesar in 44 BC, the abdication of Czar Nicholas II in 1917, and (gasp) the cancellation of the Ed Sullivan Show by CBS in 1971.

Here let's just focus on the first of these events, The Death of Caesar, by Vincenzo Camuccino, an Italian painter of the Neo-Classical style. This is a perfect example of the historic genre. We are presented with the scene of Caesar's stabbing in Rome. The classical architecture and statuary, as well as the clothing of the figures give hints about the period. The groups of men, some participating in the killing, others shocked and looking on, show the divisions and various factions in the Senate. 

And finally, in an ironic twist, Caesar is killed not in front of his seat, but at the feet of a statue of Pompey, his longtime rival in Roman politics. Is this a case of Camuccino reminding us of Vanitas?

Enjoy you day, Ides of March or no, but tread lightly

Image from www.coinreplicas.com here: http://goo.gl/XVPM1L 

#art  #treadlightly  #artandclassontheplus  #EuropeanHistory  #europeanpainting #yourdailyartstory #arthistory 
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I'm working on #5 this year so I can move on from just being a poser. Great post!
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