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College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
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Playgrounds are tough for kids in wheelchairs—the woodchips and shredded rubber aren’t exactly easy to wheel through. So our students have designed the Terra Chair, revealed at our #InnovationPalooza Impact-a-Thon, a low-cost wheelchair accessory prototype that makes playgrounds more wheelchair accessible. https://youtu.be/kGSYyS5VM8Q
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Here’s a behind the scene look at Carnegie Mellon College of Engineering’s Raj Rajkumar being interviewed by CBS’s Peter Greenberg on the topic of self-driving cars. Be sure to watch CBS This Morning on Friday, February 12. http://ow.ly/i/gCufv http://ow.ly/i/gCug6
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Clouds can have quite an impact on our global temperature, reflecting sunlight and trapping infrared radiation in our atmosphere. But can fire cause our clouds to freeze? Yes—let us explain, with Department of Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professor Ryan Sullivan’s help: http://cmu.li/Y7OnX
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Imagine a playground where autistic children could play alongside and with everyone else, without fear of overstimulation. Treblecade, the Innovation Palooza Impact-a-Thon’s winning project, proposes a collaborative musical game that could make playgrounds more fun for all. Check it out: https://youtu.be/Nctpk7yNNSY
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Pictured here is a budding Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT). The year was 1925, F. Scott Fitzgerald had just published The Great Gatsby, Mount Rushmore National Memorial was newly dedicated in South Dakota, and Calvin Coolidge was the sitting President of the United States. Andrew Carnegie’s idea of practical service found welcome agreement with President Coolidge, who praised him on more than one public occasion. #ThrowbackThursday
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MT @CMUInnovation: @Facebook's Oculus to locate virtual reality research div. in #PGH https://t.co/RADZ2HBKUx https://t.co/FiOQJd4AP4
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HAPPENING NOW: Carnegie Mellon College of Engineering Prof. Raj Rajkumar showing CBS This Morning’s Peter Greenberg where the cameras, radars and lasers are located on Carnegie Mellon University's self-driving car. Tune in now.
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It’s not just hover boards…vape pens and e-cigarettes can explode too! Carnegie Mellon Mechanical Engineering's Venkat Viswanathan explains to WIRED how lithium-ion batteries can go wrong. http://cmu.li/YcWP7
The problem usually can be traced to problems with the lithium-ion battery.
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"With generous support from Disney Research, we've built a pico-satellite that operates using harvested energy. By integrating our novel system support for on-board diagnostics and software reliability, we've made the device robust to the intermittently available energy that it will encounter while it is in space." - Brandon Lucia, Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) ‪#‎TechTuesday‬ http://ow.ly/i/gAxuF http://ow.ly/i/gAxv0
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The Dean’s Early Career Fellowships have been awarded to five distinguished young faculty for outstanding work in their fields. Join us in congratulating professors Hakan Erdogmus (ECE), Soummya Kar (ECE), Carmel Majidi (MechE), Sheng Shen (MechE), and Paulina Jaramillo (EPP). http://cmu.li/Y0lj1
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Adam Feinberg, Associate Professor of Materials Science and Biomedical Engineering, has a project in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute for Breast Cancer research, focused on 3D printing human mammary gland scaffolds. These scaffolds can be used as tools to study ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer. The lack of these types of tools has limited progress in understanding which DCIS lesions require treatment and which can be left without intervention. ‪#‎WeCanICan‬ ‪#‎WorldCancerDay‬
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College of Engineering researchers have found that the majority of errors made by the brain are caused by a mismatch between reality and the brain’s internal models. Imagine if you could map doctors’ brains as they’re learning how to use a new robotic surgical device—if they believe (incorrectly) that they are using the device correctly, pinpointing their wrong internal beliefs could lead to more efficient training programs. http://cmu.li/XR31b
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A top-five engineering college with an innovative, multidisciplinary, global focus.
Introduction
Welcome to the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University!

Today's College of Engineering is a hundred years in the making. From a trade school for the children of steelworkers to a top 10 engineering college, the college has consistently looked to the future as the measure for its mission.

As a student-centered, research-intensive college, it is our goal to offer an education that encourages innovative thinking, develops technical excellence and builds collaboration, communication, and leadership skills.

Today's engineers must be citizens of the world. From Pittsburgh to Portugal, Senegal to Shanghai, engineers are challenged to solve problems on a global scale. At the College of Engineering we are committed to building multi-cultural skills and communication, challenging our students and faculty to grow beyond borders and boundaries. This is demonstrated by our curriculum and in the staff, faculty, and students we attract.

With a global economy comes opportunity and competition. We help our students meet that challenge through a curriculum and culture that embraces innovation. Our graduate programs incorporate master's and doctorate degrees focused on innovation management and entrepreneurship. Our faculty is well known for and committed to both outstanding teaching and innovations in curricula and pedagogy.

Our pioneering, flexible undergraduate curriculum allows every student to customize the program to achieve his or her goals. This includes an initiative to support first-year students during that critical transition from high school to college. Our students represent the best and brightest minds—we are committed to securing their future.

In addition, research within the college transcends disciplinary, departmental, and college boundaries and offers a unique opportunity for students to be trained while developing the next generation of innovations that will have an impact and change society, for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Carnegie Mellon's College of Engineering is a place for people who desire to solve problems, to discover, to create, to design, to invent, and to innovate—and all of this with the goal of having an impact on society. Our alumni have distinguished themselves in many ways, and we expect that future generations will do the same.