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College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
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The ability to make smaller and smaller electronics, and other technology development, is limited by excess heat generation. Professor of Mechanical Engineering Alan McGaughey studies heat transfer and thermal conductivity at the atomic scale, to cut back excess heat generation in future technologies and enable advances in this area. Hear him discuss his research in our latest video: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWEOUSji6ps&feature=youtu.be
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Dean Garrett shakes hands with Rwanda President Paul Kagame while visiting for the 2015 CMU-Rwanda Graduation. 
https://instagram.com/p/4WwwSoE7Im/?taken-by=cmuengineering
“Dean Garrett shakes hands with Rwanda President Paul Kagame while visiting Kigali for the 2015 CMU-Rwanda graduation.”
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How can we make our infrastructure systems more intelligent, so that we can make better decisions about them? In our latest video, Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Burcu Akinci discusses her research into using smart infrastructure techniques to make infrastructure more resilient, sustainable and robust. https://youtu.be/VzBa5drG7ZM.
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What can we use to monitor the health of our deteriorating bridges, train tracks, or environment better? Sensors, say researchers in our latest episode of our Make It Real podcast.
https://soundcloud.com/cmu-engineering/sensors-the-new-macroscope
CMU Engineering
Sensors: the new "macroscope"
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What kind of car does an engineer drive? If you said an electric drag racer, you're on the right track. But the team at Carnegie Mellon Racing doesn't just drive them, they build them – and they’re taking the Formula SAE competition by storm. http://ow.ly/OlaNl
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Researchers from Engineering and Public Policy have created a tool to help states meet the new emissions standards set by Clean Power Plan section of the EPA's Clean Air Act. 
http://ow.ly/NIFEU
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Convenience store security cameras often can't capture enough biometric information to accurately identify a suspect. However, in our latest video, Marios Savvides, Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Director of CyLab Biometrics Center, discusses the potential for enhancing criminal identification using long-range iris scanners. http://youtu.be/dpALtSd4r24
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Sheryl Root, Associate Professor of Software Management at +Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley was recently honored by +WITI  (Women in Technology International) for her outstanding contribution to the field of technology and the empowerment of women. With almost 30 years of experience, Sheryl has used her career to build, empower and inspire in the field of technology. Learn more about Sheryl: http://engineering.cmu.edu/media/feature/2015/06_26_root_witi.html
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Newell Washburn and colleagues are using polymer chemistry techniques to transform one of nature's most abundant macromolecules into a material that could improve widely available commercial products, like concrete.

http://engineering.cmu.edu/media/feature/2015/06_18_concrete_science.html
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Our appetite for storage digital information—photos, video, emails—continues to grow. How do we create information storage technology that gets smaller and requires less power while storing more and more information? Jim Bain describes his research in this area in our latest video. https://youtu.be/R8hsJfFu6Wk
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In our latest video, Engineering and Public Policy Professor Erica Fuchs talks about the role of government and the effect of location in technology innovation. https://youtu.be/o6l_UBuFL0Y
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What do American and Chinese consumers want in an electric vehicle? MechE/EPP professor Jeremy Michalek and EPP Ph.D. student John Helveston share their recent findings and explain what it might mean for the future of EVs in our latest podcast. 

https://soundcloud.com/cmu-engineering/what-do-american-and-chinese-consumers-want-in-an-electric-vehicle
CMU Engineering
What do American and Chinese consumers want in an electric vehicle?
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A top-10 engineering college with an innovative, multidisciplinary, global focus.
Introduction
Welcome to the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University!

Today's College of Engineering is a hundred years in the making. From a trade school for the children of steelworkers to a top 10 engineering college, the college has consistently looked to the future as the measure for its mission.

As a student-centered, research-intensive college, it is our goal to offer an education that encourages innovative thinking, develops technical excellence and builds collaboration, communication, and leadership skills.

Today's engineers must be citizens of the world. From Pittsburgh to Portugal, Senegal to Shanghai, engineers are challenged to solve problems on a global scale. At the College of Engineering we are committed to building multi-cultural skills and communication, challenging our students and faculty to grow beyond borders and boundaries. This is demonstrated by our curriculum and in the staff, faculty, and students we attract.

With a global economy comes opportunity and competition. We help our students meet that challenge through a curriculum and culture that embraces innovation. Our graduate programs incorporate master's and doctorate degrees focused on innovation management and entrepreneurship. Our faculty is well known for and committed to both outstanding teaching and innovations in curricula and pedagogy.

Our pioneering, flexible undergraduate curriculum allows every student to customize the program to achieve his or her goals. This includes an initiative to support first-year students during that critical transition from high school to college. Our students represent the best and brightest minds—we are committed to securing their future.

In addition, research within the college transcends disciplinary, departmental, and college boundaries and offers a unique opportunity for students to be trained while developing the next generation of innovations that will have an impact and change society, for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Carnegie Mellon's College of Engineering is a place for people who desire to solve problems, to discover, to create, to design, to invent, and to innovate—and all of this with the goal of having an impact on society. Our alumni have distinguished themselves in many ways, and we expect that future generations will do the same.