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College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
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World, meet Iris! Iris, meet world. Iris is a robot that represents all the advanced iris recognition technology being developed here in our CyLab Biometrics Center. The Center won Gold at the 2015 Edison Awards in New York City! ow.ly/M3Rc1
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The +Information Networking Institute is celebrating its 25th anniversary with keynote Hooman Radfar, panel sessions & more. Happy 25th! http://ow.ly/LJSw1
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Self-aware structures: using building vibrations to check traffic conditions and help the elderly. Carnegie Mellon University Civil and Environmental Engineering​'s Hae Young Noh explains in our latest video. http://youtu.be/EqbrYDtBnzo
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Is it possible to reduce the energy used in walking without an external power source? Yes! Carnegie Mellon Mechanical Engineering Department's Steve Collins' latest work published in Nature introduces the walking assist clutch for people who walk for hours a day or have disabilities. http://ow.ly/L5OaU
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CEE's Jeanne VanBriesen is quoted in C&EN magazine on what we’re really drinking when ‪fracking‬ ‪wasterwater‬ is allowed into our drinking water. http://ow.ly/KMCbz
Almost 3 million gallons of concentrated salt water leaked in early January from a ruptured pipeline at a natural gas drilling site near Williston, N.D. The brine, a by-product of the oil and gas extraction method known as hydraulic fracturing, spilled into two creeks that empty into the ...
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Five College of Engineering faculty members receive +Research at Google Awards. Congratulations! http://ow.ly/KMNe8 
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We are so proud of CEE’s Jeanne VanBriesen for receiving the Barbara Lazarus award for Graduate Student and Faculty Mentoring. http://ow.ly/LXRNj
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Inês Azevedo of Engineering and Public Policy spoke with WIRED​ about how an increased adoption of electric vehicles will result in less gas tax revenue, which is used to fix our roadways. Azevedo suggests solutions that she and her team published in a recent paper. wrd.cm/1IKWQ7O
EVs on our roads aren't the problem, but they point to the essence of our current quagmire.
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An 80,000 word thesis would take 9 hours to present. Their time limit…3 minutes! Five engineering students are among the 11 finalists at the Three Minute Thesis Championship Round: April 7 from 5 - 6:30 in Rashid Auditorium. http://ow.ly/LaQFx #3mt
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What if cars could talk to one another? ECE's Ozan Tonguz thinks that they could someday work together to fix traffic jams using virtual stoplights. http://ow.ly/KMEjA
Virtual traffic lights seem futuristic, but a researcher from the US thinks it's a reality.
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ECE and CyLab​'s resident darkweb expert Nicholas Christin explains what online drug markets like Silk Road are really selling: trust. http://ow.ly/KMCYY
The world’s largest Internet drug marketplace seems to have stolen all its customers’ money. Technology could prevent that inconvenience
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Watch this! Marios Savvides of Carnegie Mellon University Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) and Carnegie Mellon CyLab has just demonstrated for the first time that a person can be identified by scanning their iris in the side-view mirror of a car! youtu.be/13zFQh7BPG4
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A top-10 engineering college with an innovative, multidisciplinary, global focus.
Introduction
Welcome to the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University!

Today's College of Engineering is a hundred years in the making. From a trade school for the children of steelworkers to a top 10 engineering college, the college has consistently looked to the future as the measure for its mission.

As a student-centered, research-intensive college, it is our goal to offer an education that encourages innovative thinking, develops technical excellence and builds collaboration, communication, and leadership skills.

Today's engineers must be citizens of the world. From Pittsburgh to Portugal, Senegal to Shanghai, engineers are challenged to solve problems on a global scale. At the College of Engineering we are committed to building multi-cultural skills and communication, challenging our students and faculty to grow beyond borders and boundaries. This is demonstrated by our curriculum and in the staff, faculty, and students we attract.

With a global economy comes opportunity and competition. We help our students meet that challenge through a curriculum and culture that embraces innovation. Our graduate programs incorporate master's and doctorate degrees focused on innovation management and entrepreneurship. Our faculty is well known for and committed to both outstanding teaching and innovations in curricula and pedagogy.

Our pioneering, flexible undergraduate curriculum allows every student to customize the program to achieve his or her goals. This includes an initiative to support first-year students during that critical transition from high school to college. Our students represent the best and brightest minds—we are committed to securing their future.

In addition, research within the college transcends disciplinary, departmental, and college boundaries and offers a unique opportunity for students to be trained while developing the next generation of innovations that will have an impact and change society, for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Carnegie Mellon's College of Engineering is a place for people who desire to solve problems, to discover, to create, to design, to invent, and to innovate—and all of this with the goal of having an impact on society. Our alumni have distinguished themselves in many ways, and we expect that future generations will do the same.