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College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
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Associate Professor Steve Collins develops lightweight, unpowered and low-powered wearable exoskeletons for ankles and legs to reduce the energy expended in walking and enhance performance. For someone recovering from a stroke, devices based on these technologies could be life changing. ‪#‎StrokeAwarenessMonth‬
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Ever heard of a plasma asher? Our Nanofabrication Facility, or Nanofab, offers these and many more deposition, etch, lithography, and metrology tools—including thermal evaporators, sputtering systems, and optical steppers. https://youtu.be/dPDPcEeuR58
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Raj Rajkumar, self-driving car expert, will speak at 2016 #TEDxPittsburgh, May 22: http://www.tedxpittsburgh.org/
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Learn how Professor Burcu Akinci is using smart infrastructure techniques to make infrastructure systems more resilient, sustainable, and robust. #InfrastructureMatters https://youtu.be/VzBa5drG7ZM
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Why is it important for people to understand both policy and technology? “So that policy does not overly restrict innovation,” says engineering and public policy alum Janice Tsai. Learn how Tsai’s experience in EPP is helping her bridge the gap between effective legislation and tech needs. http://cmu.li/IxBj300ePIo
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Watch Scott Hall get built right before your eyes! https://youtu.be/EKm-Hq5mz1M
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Researchers in the College of Engineering have discovered that melanin could be used as a battery cathode: http://cmu.li/qlph300qoqr
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Raj Rajkumar, self-driving car expert, will speak at 2016 #TEDxPittsburgh today. Livestream: http://www.tedxpittsburgh.org/livestream/
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Congratulations to Engineering & Public Policy doctoral student Will Frankenstein, who’s won the 2016 Graduate Service Award. This award recognizes one student each year who renders extraordinary service to graduate students and the university. http://cmu.li/ilfl300mYIW
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Congratulations to the winners of the CMU Engineering 2016 Faculty Awards! The George Tallmann Ladd Research Award has been awarded to CEE/EPP’s Meagan Mauter; the Benjamin Richard Teare Teaching Award to BME’s Conrad Zapanta; the Philip L. Dowd Fellowship Award to ECE/CMU-SV’s Hakan Erdogmus, Cécile Péraire, and Jia Zhang; the Outstanding Research Award to MechE’s Jonathan Malen; the Outstanding Mentoring Award to CEE/EPP’s Mitch Small; and the Distinguished Professor of Engineering Award to ECE’s José M.F. Moura.
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How to hack the hackers: The human side of cybercrime. [article+game] in Nature News: https://t.co/IFCwQwCUjw https://t.co/GBCKa9cqKz
As cyberattacks grow ever more sophisticated, those who defend against them are embracing behavioural science and economics to understand both the perpetrators and their victims.
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Three years ago, Assistant Professor in the Carnegie Mellon Mechanical Engineering Department Reeja Jayan was diagnosed with celiac disease. Today, she is developing a sensor to scan food for potential allergens, starting with gluten proteins. She plans to integrate the system directly into a smartphone platform for convenient and efficient allergen sensing. ‪#‎60ForCeliac‬

Learn more about her research: http://cmu.li/eLsq3007cHI
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A top-five engineering college with an innovative, multidisciplinary, global focus.
Introduction
Welcome to the College of Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University!

Today's College of Engineering is a hundred years in the making. From a trade school for the children of steelworkers to a top 10 engineering college, the college has consistently looked to the future as the measure for its mission.

As a student-centered, research-intensive college, it is our goal to offer an education that encourages innovative thinking, develops technical excellence and builds collaboration, communication, and leadership skills.

Today's engineers must be citizens of the world. From Pittsburgh to Portugal, Senegal to Shanghai, engineers are challenged to solve problems on a global scale. At the College of Engineering we are committed to building multi-cultural skills and communication, challenging our students and faculty to grow beyond borders and boundaries. This is demonstrated by our curriculum and in the staff, faculty, and students we attract.

With a global economy comes opportunity and competition. We help our students meet that challenge through a curriculum and culture that embraces innovation. Our graduate programs incorporate master's and doctorate degrees focused on innovation management and entrepreneurship. Our faculty is well known for and committed to both outstanding teaching and innovations in curricula and pedagogy.

Our pioneering, flexible undergraduate curriculum allows every student to customize the program to achieve his or her goals. This includes an initiative to support first-year students during that critical transition from high school to college. Our students represent the best and brightest minds—we are committed to securing their future.

In addition, research within the college transcends disciplinary, departmental, and college boundaries and offers a unique opportunity for students to be trained while developing the next generation of innovations that will have an impact and change society, for both graduate and undergraduate students.

Carnegie Mellon's College of Engineering is a place for people who desire to solve problems, to discover, to create, to design, to invent, and to innovate—and all of this with the goal of having an impact on society. Our alumni have distinguished themselves in many ways, and we expect that future generations will do the same.