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Gus Hill and His Famous Performing Indian Clubs - Another look at Gus Hill and his famous performing Indian Clubs. http://ow.ly/2Xk6RC
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Frank E. Miller - Frank E. Miller was the physical director of the Young Men's Christian Association of Dallas, Texas in the late ninteeth and early twentieth century. In 1900, MIller wrote an excellent training guide for indian club swinging entitled "Indian Club-Swinging: One, Two, and Three Club Juggling." Due to his club work, Miller was unsurprisingly also an expert fencer and golfer. http://ow.ly/2W3tmp
Frank E. Miller was the physical director of the Young Men's Christian Association of Dallas, Texas in the late ninteeth and early twentieth century. In 1900, MIller wrote an excellent training guide for indian club swinging entitled "Indian Club-Swinging: One, Two, and Three Club Juggling." Due to his club work, Miller was unsurprisingly also an expert fencer and golfer.
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Bill Hunt - Bill Hunt was an excellent British weightlifter and handbalancer and this was his most daring feat: Bill first balanced precariously atop a six foot ladder which was also sitting on a table top. With a sudden flick of his arms, he knocked the ladder to the side and landed on the table while still maintaining the handstand! ~ THAT'S pretty amazing. http://ow.ly/2VMy5l
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Wilfred Briton - Wilfred Briton, from Yorkshire, was the toast of the variety show circuit in the 1930's and 40's. "The Amazing Wilfred" performed a multitude of traditional strongman feats such as breaking clay pipes in his clenched fists, bending iron bars, supporting a piano player in the "tomb of Hercules,"  pulling heavy strands while supporting feats two other people, and, as shown here, ripping decks of cards (always a popular one.) Wilf was the feature of severa... http://ow.ly/2VwMBo
Wilfred Briton, from Yorkshire, was the toast of the variety show circuit in the 1930's and 40's.
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Harry Good - Like many strongmen, Harry Good was very talented at feats of grip and forearm strength. Here he lifts a set of heavy farm equipment gears weighing over 300 pounds with one finger. His best performance in this lift was with over 450 pounds. http://ow.ly/2Vr9Ow
Like many strongmen, Harry Good was very talented at feats of grip and forearm strength. Here he lifts a set of heavy farm equipment gears weighing over 300 pounds with one finger. His best performance in this lift was with over 450 pounds.
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Muscular Development October, 1964, featuring Steve Reeves - Here we have the October, 1964 issue of Muscular Development magazine (making this one the tenth issue ever) which features a painting of the great Steve Reeves on the cover. The first unofficial Powerlifting championships was to be held in York, Pennsylvania shortly after this issue hit the news stands so the issue focused on quite a bit of powerlifting related news and training including an excellent and qui... http://ow.ly/2UBZIm
Here we have the October, 1964 issue of Muscular Development magazine (making this one the tenth issue ever) which features a painting of the great Steve Reeves on the cover.
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Professor Gilman Low - The World's Champion Endurance Back Lifter http://ow.ly/2Wi4U5
In 1907, Professor Gilman Low established the phenomenal record of one million-six-thousand (1,006,000) pounds in thirty five minutes and four seconds -- interestingly, this was after a period of training on one meal a day and less. Low's record was accomplished by backlifting 1000 pounds 1,006 times in thirty five minutes and thirty four seconds. Immediately following, Low set an additional record by lifting 2000 lbs. forty four times in four mi...
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Terlazzo's Inverted Press - One of the exercises that the great Tony Terlazzo used to improve his standing press was what he called "the inverted press" - essentially a handstand press on top of two boxes to increase the range of motion. Terlazzo was a 13-time Weightlifting national Champion, something to think about if you're working on your press too. http://ow.ly/2VPz2T
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MacFadden's Headstands - Here's Bernarr MacFadden standing on his head around eighty years of age. MacDadden followed a daily exercise routine his entire life and headstands were always included - he believed that being in an inverted position helped his brainpower! Macfadden was a bit of a nut on many topics but he may be on to something there... http://ow.ly/2VxTwf
Here's Bernarr MacFadden standing on his head around eighty years of age. MacDadden followed a daily exercise routine his entire life and headstands were always included - he believed that being in an inverted position helped his brainpower! Macfadden was a bit of a nut on many topics but he may be on to something there...
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Cadine's Leverage Feat - Here's an interesting feat achieved by the great French weightlifting champion Ernest Cadine in 1934: lifting a dozen pool cues by their tips. You can try this one at home. http://ow.ly/2VruWG
Here's an interesting feat achieved by the great French weightlifting champion Ernest Cadine in 1934: lifting a dozen pool cues by their tips. You can try this one at home.
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Paul Anderson's Upside Down Training - Paul Anderson was not a handbalancer per se, but he did discover some interesting reasons to introduce upside-down training into repertoire. Here's something that Big Paul wrote in 1970: "...As I did more thinking on the subject, I made a great discovery. This discovery was that the reason the thighs were responding so rapidly to weight training was that they had such a free flow of blood, and the upper body and even Lower back did... http://ow.ly/2UC4hm
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Apollon Poster - Here's a rare poster from Apollon 1897 tour of Germany. Unsurprisingly, heavy supporting lifts were the norm as they allowed rather impressive weights (and types of weights) to be used. It was probably Sandow who began this practice, lifting a horse with one arm and walking across the stage.  As far as lifting bicycles and their riders, this feat made appearances for many years to come, (check out this and this.) http://ow.ly/2UhAES
Here's a rare poster from Apollon 1897 tour of Germany. Unsurprisingly, heavy supporting lifts were the norm as they allowed rather impressive weights (and types of weights) to be used. It was probably Sandow who began this practice, lifting a horse with one arm and walking across the stage and this feat made appearances for many years after, (check out this and this.)
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