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Sergio Peñaranda
Linux Kernel user, Pro GT Racer.
Linux Kernel user, Pro GT Racer.
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Excuse me, do you have a moment to talk about Linux?

#linux   #penguin   #software   #operatingsystem  
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Nice Art.

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Buy laptop - wipe windoze or OSX - install Linux - start working 
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Your manual to drive a Formula One car:
 
Have you ever wondered what all the buttons, switches and levers on a Formula One steering wheel are used for? Well, here’s your answer!
 
Following are the controls most used by the drivers during a race:
➡ Shifting levers
➡ KERS boost
➡ DRS
➡ RPM / Fuel / Pedal
➡ Radio (R)
 
Some additional information:
➡ Average number of shifting events per race (all races): 2’750
➡ Grand Prix with the highest number of shifting events per lap and per race: Singapore (70 per lap, approx. 4’270 in total)
➡ Grand Prix with the least shifting events per race: Belgium (1’980 in total; 44 per lap)
➡ Grand Prix with the least shifting events per lap: Brazil (36 per lap, 2’556 in total)
 
➡ Average KERS boost button usage: 4x per lap, >220x per race
➡ Average use of team radio: <1x per lap, >30x per race
 
All clear? Then hop in and start your engines! If not, don’t hesitate to ask…
 
And, as a special service to our fans, here is a link to download a high-res PDF of this infographic (A3 / 4.2 MB): http://tinyurl.com/PDFdownload-E
 
Yours, +Sauber F1 Team

#F1 #SauberF1Team #Infographic #SteeringWheel www.sauberf1team.com
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Meet the pit stop crew!
 
A while ago Tomáš Černý (a F1 fan) suggested to us on Google+ to introduce the pit stop crew to fans. This chart explains who does what during a pit stop. We hope you like it!

May we suggest to
share this post if you find it interesting
plus this post if you like it
circle us in if you want more like this
 
Some facts & figures about pit stops:

Anything between 2 and 3 seconds is considered a good pit stop.

Since January 2013, our pit stop crew has performed more than 500 training pit stops.

The crew practices pit stops for 45 minutes every Thursday prior to a race.

Another 20-30 minutes of pit stop practice follows on Friday.

On Sunday morning, some 4-6 ‘warm-up’ pit stops are performed.

For pit stop practice at the track, the car is pushed by 3 people to simulate the approach.

A side jack is used if the nose has to be changed. The front wheels are then changed by one person per wheel and the other 4 help with the nose change.

Can you figure out why this particular pit stop wasn’t an ideal one?
 
Already found a place for Sauber F1 Team in your circles? Highly appreciated!
 
Have a great weekend,
+Sauber F1 Team

Oh, and just in case you missed this very special pit stop, watch it now: http://youtu.be/D8_7N67CO84

 
#F1 #SauberF1Team #PitStop #Infographic www.sauberf1team.com
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NASA moves to Linux
“We migrated key functions from Windows to Linux because we needed an operating system that was stable and reliable – one that would give us in-house control. So if we needed to patch, adjust or adapt, we could.” 
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