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Matthew Ho
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http://pastebin.com/2D6bHGTa

但係呢d statistics幾好睇
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Marketing 2.0?! make use of platform power & tightly monitor consumers by iteration
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a new thought on simplifying 3D modeling !
 
I'm rather obsessed with user generated content, particularly art tools. Recently, I had a wonderful experience with Realm of the Mad God. Alex Carobus added in a simple pixel editor that allowed ...
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Marketing Strategy of Flash game
 
A good article on strategies in the realm of "making a game to sell through a Flash portal"
http://gamasutra.com/view/feature/168303/defenders_quest_by_the_numbers.php
Indie developer Lars Doucet explains how his team's game Defender's Quest survived the change from a free Flash game to a full-fledged download title, and share insight into how audiences find and d...
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Another statistics

SteamBirds: By the Numbers - http://www.andymoore.ca/2010/03/steambirds-by-the-numbers/
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香港news黎架~~~
我公司上星期已經有人講
 ·  Translate
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Concrete example & implementation of Csíkszentmihályi flows
 
Sometimes +Ian Bogost writes an essay that really clicks with me. Check out his article on Process Intensity.

In particular he makes several worthy distinctions:

Process Intensity is a ratio of processing to static data.
You can thus have a high process intensity game (such as the Marriage) with little processing because the systematic complexity that exists is not diluted by excess data.

There are different types of processing
Chris Crawford was talking about processing from the viewpoint of a computer executing code. However, we can expand this concept beyond single player computer games,

Computer process: Processes that occur within a computer. Often this takes the form of simulation and acting as an enforcer of formal game rules.

Social process: Processes that occur between people. This is a universe, ranging from group formation, competition, cooperation, politics

I'd extend this
Data process: Internal processes that occur in the consumption of complex layered static data. Example: Peeling back the layers of Finnegans Wake. It is an act of reveal packaged meaning.

Mastery process: Internal processes that result from them iteratively improving mental models of the systems at hand. Example: The process that results in the acquisition of mental model that distinguish a new chess player from a master chess player. It is an act of inventing useful tools.

The various combinations and ratios of these attributes help describe the space in which various games operate.
- Dear Esther: An attempt at High Data that often misses, Low Social (unless you are a critic), Low Mastery
- Diablo: Moderate Mastery, Moderate Social, Low Data
- Go: Moderate social, High mastery, Low Data
- Asshole (the card game): High social, Low mastery, Low Data.
- J.S. Joust: High social, High mastery, Low data.

Relationships to other writers
To critique Crawford (who is amazing for raising these questions in the first place), no one except programmers gives a damn about 'computer process'. Only human processes ultimately matter. We are selfish that way. Social, data and mastery can be facilitated by computer process, but it is by no means essential. In fact, poorly structured computer processing can lead to impenetrable simulations that actively damage the mastery process.

To critique Doug Wilson, J.S. Joust is a radically different class of game than Dear Esther. The confusion comes from the fact that he is merely looking at computer process. The designs have the right idea (focus on rich social process and mastery process) but the designer takes a stand on the wrong problem (the evils of computer process...which is essentially a meaningless axis of investment)

To critique most traditional media critics: They often overvalue the presence of Data processes and undervalue social and mastery processes. Which is sad since high mastery and high social process works exist in other media as well (Midnight showings of Rocky Horror Picture Show come to mind).

To critique game developers: We've been generally quite bad at including data process into our games. Even when the quantity of static content is high, the iterative mental effort needed to unpack its meaning is low. More problematic is the fact that almost all attempts to improve upon this state of affairs seems to wreak havoc on simultaneous attempts at including mastery or social processes. I personally ignore this issue. I've got bigger opportunities to worry about than fixating on this odd little edge case.

All this also ties very nicely into the concept of cognitive load where the sum of the processing costs associated with data, mastery and social process puts a burden on the player's brain. (Csíkszentmihályi flows from there)

take care,
Danc.
In this analysis, developer and scholar Ian Bogost takes a critical look at Chris Crawford's concept of process intensity, how it applies to contemporary games, and in particular answers some assertio...
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treat them as learning opportunities, not signs of weakness.
Uncovering gaps between cognitive barriers & facts can be a source of innovation.
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"Illusion of Explanatory Depth" - the learning-confident curve
http://scienceblogs.com/mixingmemory/2006/11/the_illusion_of_explanatory_de.php
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Gamification on vim
If you've ever had the pleasure of using VIM, the popular Linux (and other platforms) text editor, you'll know that dark magic lies
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Cross Devices/Platforms UI design
 
The hidden cost of cross platform layout
So I am looking at the launch window and the subsequent couple years of the new game designs I'm working on. Here are the constraints.

Launching rapidly across multiple platforms
I don't want cloners establishing a brand for one of my original game mechanics first. One way to reduce this is to fast follow your own products and be first into a variety of markets. For us, this means being on the open web, social, iPhone, Android Phone, iPad and Android Tablet.

Many platforms yield many different screen sizes and orientations.
iOS alone has landscape, portrait, small & large screens. Android adds in widescreen aspect ratios. Web portals give broadest distribution at 640x480. Social portals allow up to 760 pixel wide screens. Steam users want to play full screen.

Small touch devices have very different UI needs than either web or tablet.
The buttons need to be much larger. The number of elements on the screen needs to be less. 4 or 5 items is all the fits. You can't just shrink the UI down.

Frequent updates often involving the interface
One of the most common elements to tweak in a game after it goes out the door are the flows in various areas like tutorial, merchandising, viral promotion systems, reengagement systems, and of course the store. These have a direct impact on whether or not the game makes money (and whether or not you can keep developing the project long term).

In practical terms this means you are making lots of small changes on a rapid basis. And those changes need to be replicated across dozens of different UI layouts.

Ideas for streamlining cross platform development

Making bigger chunkier buttons
The most I can translate directly between platforms without redrawing everything the better. Just as PC titles suffered from consolitis, they will also suffer from mobilitis.

Using more lists
Lists scroll nicely when reduced down to small screens. They also work on larger screens.

Giving up on portrait aspect ratio
By making all the games landscape, you save an enormous amount of UI work.

Changing the style of buttons
Instead of having a small buy button next to an item, I make the entire item and the background of the item into the button. This still ends up being aesthetically pleasing, but works much better on mobile.

Making more use of basic dynamic layout
9-grids, snapping UI to corners of the screen and other basic tricks mean you can scale the UI without distorting it. In general, I'm finding it best to avoid fixed layouts where UI pieces are tightly connect as if part of a Tetris puzzle. Floating dialogs, widgets and palettes are a godsend.

Avoid hierarchical dynamic layout when possible
This is when a UI element inside another UI element scales based off the scaling of its parent. Web pages do this. Desktop applications do this. It is a huge pain and often adds as much time to the QA process as it saves. Also the layout systems underlying it are typically not available between platforms and writing your own from scratch becomes more than a little expensive. 9 times out of 10, simplifying your UI is the better solution.

Working at 300 DPI first
This is the big change prompted by the iPad 3. The good news is that even if devices go higher than this, it won't be easily perceptible to the user. This suggests the strategy of starting with the highest resolution assets and then downscale everything in code. This lets you build the UI once on the art side of the asset pipeline. It is an expense, but not so bad if you work in vectors or 3D.

Curious what other folks are doing.
Danc.
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Brick Builder of Code, like Game Design & Psycho.
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