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Sudev Ambadi
350 followers -
Computer Enthusiast
Computer Enthusiast

350 followers
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Blog moved :(
I'm in love with markdown and github pages  (simple and version controlled writings). Link to new blog .

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Yo peeing positions :p

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There she goes.

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The boot process explained :)
RedHat/CentOS boot sequence diagram

#redhat #centos
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Auto created Google awesomes. CSE Farewell 2010 Batch. 
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2014-04-23
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What kind of user are you ?
What kind of linux user are you ?
#linux  
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Sure

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True :)
"There has to be something funky in your data." -- Number 14 was one of our faves! Check out the Top 20 Replies by #Programmers
Join our new group at : http://bit.ly/ImProgrammerGoogleGroup
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Arch!
The beauty of Arch Linux

I have used a lot of linux distributions over the time for both work and private. I have used #ubuntu  as a base for all systems i used and it worked fine for years. 

With #ubuntu  you just have this "install the package" and basically it will work without a lot of work. This is cool if you just want a running system without a lot of work. Or at least it looks like it, i'll come to that later. The problem for me was that Ubuntu got more and more unstable for my desktop use. That's the point where i switched to #archlinux

ArchLinux has a pretty high hurdles when you first set it up. This is because arch does not have a GUI installer. Right from the start you need to know what you do. Well it works to just use the Beginners guide in the Wiki to do it too ;) But still you need to know how linux works under the hood.

After that first hurdle you will have a damn stable and fast base system where you can build up whatever you need. This can be a desktop with the full variety of linux window managers or a server system that runs exactly what you want.

I took me some time to get used to it as it's a different distribution and does not use a bunch of damn old methods to run the system.

The best example is #systemd . It's so damn great to use compared to /etc/init.d stuff - it's really laughable that so many distributions still use that. It takes some time to get used to it but then it's just straight forward. 

This week i switched the last remaining system i had under my control to Arch Linux. During the migration when, i started to turn off the old stuff, it became very obvious. The simplicity of ubuntu is mainly a not needing to know what does what and where to find it. You kind of think that it's normal that you define some services in one file and others here or there. If you are used to Arch something like that is just a mess!  You do not find the configs in one place, the services are not configured the same way and you really need to remember more stuff to manage it.

Sure you have to configure your stuff in arch as well but it's way better structured. You have your configs and separated service descriptions that systemd will load. Sounds like more work to do but it's not and it makes life so much easier in the long run.

I'm not sure if i would use Arch in a large scale enterprise production system but that's mainly because nobody has the time to just take care of the OS there. Arch is a rolling distribution and so you don't have stable releases. You just update and get the latest stuff. In enterprise this would need it's own mirror to get something stable (not changing) for testing and rollout in the whole environment. This is something i would not like to have to manage and maintain in enterprise systems.

For everything else i will use Arch for sure!
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