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Ciro Villa
134,587 followers -
Testing this Universe - Philomath
Testing this Universe - Philomath

134,587 followers
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"Evidence of planetary debris surrounding a double sun, 'Tatooine-like' system has been found for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers.

Published today in Nature Astronomy and funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council and the European Research Council, the study finds the remains of shattered asteroids orbiting a double sun consisting of a white dwarf and a brown dwarf roughly 1000 light-years away in a system called SDSS 1557."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-evidence-rocky-planet-formation-tatooine.html

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Path of Comet Encke through early March.

It's in twilight, but some are locating it...

More charts and details: http://bit.ly/2lfCHB6
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"(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Favio Faifer of the National University of La Plata, Argentina, has discovered the first ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxy in an X-ray bright galaxy group designated NGC 5044. The finding was presented Feb. 21 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print repository.

Located some 116 million light years away, NGC 5044 is an early-type massive elliptical galaxy residing at the center of an X-ray bright group also named NGC 5044. This group contains about 150 members, most of which are dwarf galaxies. Although the group's center galaxy has been the subject of several past studies, its globular cluster and UCD system remain unexplored."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-02-ultra-compact-dwarf-galaxy-group-ngc.html

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This is so neat! In memory of Bill Paxton, (who starred in the movie "Twister"), storm chasers across Oklahoma and Kansas are geopositioning themselves to spell his initials.

Check out @Aaron_Brackett's Tweet: https://twitter.com/Aaron_Brackett/status/835943665046540288?s=09 
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When was the first star born?

Our Universe was born pristine, with no stars, galaxies, molecules or even stable atoms, some 13.8 billion years ago. Yet today, we're filled with all the complex structure we see today, including with planets, organics and even something as complex and differentiated as a human being. So how did we get here? We had to form stars and galaxies, and evolve the Universe to a point where the raw ingredients to make us existed in great enough abundances and in the right conditions. There are some steps we're still learning about in this story, including how the very first stars came to be.

Want to learn about it? Find out on this latest Starts With A Bang podcast!

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Stargazers applaud as moon eclipses sun - Stargazers applauded as they were plunged into darkness Sunday when the moon passed in front of the sun in a spectacular "ring of fire" eclipse.

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R.I.P. Bill Paxton, one of the most iconic actors of the least 3 decades and one of my favorite.

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/national-international/Actor-Bill-Paxton-Dies-at-61-414812073.html

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL - At the request of the new Trump Administration, NASA has initiated a month long study to determine the feasibility of converting the first integrated unmanned launch of the agency’s new Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket and…

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“The universe’s expansion means our visible horizon is retreating; things faraway are vanishing continuously. (Albeit slowly, right now.) This would seem to imply we are losing information about the universe. So why is it the idea of losing information in a black hole’s event horizon is so controversial, if we’re constantly losing information to another horizon?”

As you look to greater and greater distances, you’re looking back in time in the Universe. But thanks to dark energy, what we can see and access today isn’t always going to be accessible. As galaxies grow more distant with the accelerated expansion of the Universe, they eventually recede faster than the speed of light. At present, 97% of the galaxies in the Universe aren’t reachable by us, even at the speed of light. But that isn’t the same as losing information. As a galaxy crosses over the horizon, its information never disappears from the Universe connected to us entirely. Instead, it gets imprinted on the cosmic horizon, the same way that information falling into a black hole gets imprinted on its event horizon. But there’s a fundamental difference between a black hole’s decaying horizon to the cosmic horizon’s eternal persistence, and that makes all the difference.

Come learn why even with dark energy, we don’t lose information about the Universe, but why the black hole information paradox is real!
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