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Chris Fancher
269 followers -
Design Thinking teacher at Meridian World School in Round Rock TX and National Faculty with BIE.
Design Thinking teacher at Meridian World School in Round Rock TX and National Faculty with BIE.

269 followers
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Chris's posts

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What questions should you ask before getting a maker space in your school?

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What's better PBL or Design? What's the difference? Why should you care? My thoughts.

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In which I recognize a teacher for inspiring me to choose this profession. 

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Being overt about plans for my next project.

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Filling a gap in the calendar with a skill students need to better understand empathy.

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Where I comment on the continuing process of over charging teachers. 

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Starting out to be a great school year. Took a +Seth Godin  quote and gave it to my 7th graders to munch on in my Design class. See the questions they generated in this post. 

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Old age has crept up on me - thought this was posted last week! Time to write another post about my first day of school. That's today by the way. 

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Chris Fancher commented on a post on Blogger.
     A similar list of steps, to your list ,would be the Question Formulation Technique (QFT) by the Right Question Institute. I have used it for quite a while and I now use it when I am facilitating PBL training for BIE.  I start by posing a provocative statement or image to get the creative juices flowing. I have students (or teachers) write down all questions that come to mind, quietly, for 3 minutes. They are not to make any decisions about the questions being "good" or "bad."  I tell them that if they suddenly think, "I wonder what's for lunch?" then write it down.  Then, in groups, they share their questions. I follow that up by having each group select 3 questions that will be "their questions." The next step is to share out the 3 questions so that we end up with a class list of questions. I always ask if there is one more question that someone needs answered and I'll add that to the list. These are the "classes questions." 

  By asking questions first, students can now approach the brainstorming process on specific questions to be answered. The brainstorming, as you suggested, can be done in different groupings and for different facets of the learning such as research or ideation.

   Enjoyed George C's post and your response here. 
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