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Cad'ika Orade
Works at Intel Corporation
Attends Florida Atlantic University
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Probably one of the best comics I have read in a while. :D
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Star Wars is good too, but these MLP comics are pure gold in writing and art. Longer too. :D
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I need a button like that.
+James Karaganis 
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Wow. I'm simply amazed and seriously consider looking into this sort of thing.

Any thoughts, +Bug G. Membracid ?
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No words.

No words can describe how seriously awesome these cats are. Look at these guys! Do they care that they are falling at terminal velocity? NOPE!
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Also, I am aware this isn't real. Still awesome, though.
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I support gun control, but I don't tell people that.

When roughly 80% of people, especially liberals, say "gun control" they really mean "gun prohibition". There's nothing wrong with guns.

I would like to see a certification system, requiring a regular testing in order to maintain licensing.

Then again, I would support the same measures on parenthood...
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+John Bump

I see what you mean. The 2nd Amendment doesn't seem to have been written with morons in mind.

I'm talking about something akin to a driver's license. Some mechanism not intended on separating rich from poor but rather competent from incompetent.

Then again, considering how expensive guns are, if you can afford to shell out a few hundred for a gun you could probably afford a $10 licensing fee. As for a multiple choice exam and a short safety demonstration, I can see little issue. With fairly little effort, the DMV could administer these tests and issue licenses.

And if you need significant amounts of time to study for a gun safety exam, thank God you don't already own a gun. o_O
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Have them in circles
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Cad'ika Orade

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Every semester I repaint my helmet, to cover scrapes and dings and to make it original.

What does G+ think of this semester's design?
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Saw this, though of +John Bump .
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I'm always glad to post something people appreciate. :D
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It is disturbing how often I hear huge explosions at night while living in Boca Raton.

I think I just heard a grenade explode.
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On the implementation of multidimensional chess.

The creation of Cartesian 3D chess is exceedingly simple, being little more than an array of 8 standard chess boards arranged vertically. Modification of the rules is as simple as allowing movement along the Z axis, following the same restrictions as movement along the traditional X and Y axes. This is an exercise so simple as to be deemed trivial.

 A more complex exercise, however, comes in the addition of a more abstract axis, which we will cal the T axis to represent time. The concept of moving chess pieces forward and backward in time may seem impossible given the current advances in physics, but with some careful thought it can be done. For simplicity, I will discuss the addition of a T axis to a traditional 2D game of chess.

In terms of computer programming, a chess board is very much like a static, 2-dimensional array of 64 elements (8, 8). The addition of a T axis would require shifting instead to a 3-dimensional dynamic array where the first two indices are static (X, Y) and the third index is dynamic. At the start of the game, the state of the 2D board would be stored across the X and Y indices at T = 0. After the first move, the state of the board would again be saved, but as T = 1, so on and so on. Maintaining this much data would, unfortunately, necessitate the game to be played through a computer. The use of pen-and-paper bookkeeping would only be practical in long-term games such as "chess by mail".

Now that we have found a way of visualizing and tracking the T axis, the next step is to modify the rules to account for motion along this new axis. Unlike the trivial case of the Z axis, players are unable to directly move their pieces through time (though miniaturized time machines would make this far easier). Instead, we must make do by first deciding to visualize time as a line. Then we must decide that any influence we may have on the past changes it instantly, creating an entirely new future. Essentially, altering the past cancels the present and everything in between, replacing it with the present as it would be after being impacted by our changes in the past. In terms of our dynamic array model, this means that moving a piece back in time means resetting the board to how it was at the target point in the past, discarding every time since, and continuing from there.

For the sake of continuity (as anyone who's watched any science fiction should know) a few special rules must be added regarding time travel, assuming that a piece has been sent back in time:

1. If the original piece is lost, so is its duplicate from the future. If a piece was captured in the past, then we couldn't have sent it back from the future.

2. When the game again reaches the T where the piece was sent back from, the past piece is removed. A confusing concept, but it simply means that once you reach the point where you sent the piece back in time, you must do so again, regardless of anything else. This could result in an important piece being taken out of play at a very inconvenient time.

3. The King cannot travel through time. Allowing the King to travel through time would make it far too easy for the king to vanish into the future, drawing out the game.

As for sending a piece into the future, the piece is simply taken out of play for a period of time, until the targeted T is reached.

Next come the rules regarding how individual pieces can travel through time. This is simple to do, as we can apply the same rules to the T axis as already apply to the X and Y axes. For example, the Rook can move up to 8   units along X or Y, so it would be able to do the same along T. Similarly, the Bishop can travel up to 8 units, but must travel the same number of units in any two dimensions, in this case meaning any combination of the X, Y, and T axes. The Queen, however, is a dangerous piece indeed. At first thought, it seems that the Queen should be able to travel up to 8 units along any number of axes, but this is far too overpowered, like a cruise missile in a time machine. As such, another rule must be added:

4. The Queen may not move long more than two axes at a time.
Or, alternatively:
4. The Queen may only move a maximum of 16 units, summed between movement along all axes.

Personally, I prefer the second version, as the first version makes the queen no different than the Bishop.

Another balance issue comes into play regarding pieces traveling through time and capturing opposing pieces. In theory, the game could be ended in two moves of the Queen, traveling a couple moves into the past and into the space of the opposing King. To remedy this:

5. No piece may make a capture in the same move as traveling backwards in time.

Traveling forwards is less of an issue, since it would be more difficult to attack a piece that has not yet moved into a space, making it no easier than any other traditional strategy. The issue with traveling forwards in time, however, if what to do if the target space is occupied in the future. The solution is rather simple:

6. If a piece travels forward in time and arrives in a space occupied by an opposing piece, it the arriving piece is captured. If the space is occupied by a friendly piece, however, the arriving piece is placed in an adjacent open space, chosen by the opponent.

As a result, a player would have to be careful not to allow a targeted space to be blocked, lest they give their opponent an advantage by allowing them to choose the new location of the piece.
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+John Bump
When a player moves back in time, the game switches instantly. Moving to an occupied space in the past is not allowed and easily determined, as this sort of chess would require an interface allowing both players to see all past moves easily. Again, a computer is called for.

In theory, it should be impossible to send more than one piece into the same point in the past. Moving several pieces into the future would be possible, however, but rather risky as a shrewd opponent would work to gain control of your pieces' destinations.
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My mind is officially blown.
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A Moral About Censorship


This is pretty awesome.

Derpy is a character in the new (cool) My Little Pony born from an animation error in an early episode. The fans grabbed hold of her, named her, and made her into one of the most beloved characters in the show.

Studio B, the people who make the show, decided to do something for us fans and gave Derpy a very brief speaking role in an episode. The fan sites pretty much exploded. Then some parents saw it and got offended at the very existence of a character with a mental disability. These parents started a petition demanding the episode be censored, since children should never ever be exposed to the idea that people can be different.

In response, we Bronies started our own petition, demanding that Derpy remain. The parents got all of 60 signatures. The Bronies got over 500,000 signatures. Regardless, Hasbro released an edited version that "fixed" Derpy by removing her name and making her look, sound, and act "normal".

Since then, the creators of the show have struck back by hiding Derpy, derped eyes and all, somewhere in every single episode.

The pictures above show screenshots from the recent MLP iOS/Android game. If you look carefully, you can find Derpy hiding in a box. Catch her, and she'll roam about the town, tripping, stumbling, bumping into things, and just generally being her happy, unique self.

Brings a tear to my eye.
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In retrospect, the censor fiasco only served to unite the Brony fandom and make Derpy even more popular.

I've also had a lot of fun distributing the "uncensored" episode. Thank goodness someone managed to get a 1080p recording of the original version before it got taken off the air.

Hasbro later promised not to censor the show again, and in response Studio B announced a future episode entitled "A Day in the Life of Derp", as much to spite their Hasbro overlords as to please the fans.
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People
Have them in circles
87 people
josh brown's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Intel Corporation
    present
  • Advanced Micro Devices
  • NVIDIA
Basic Information
Birthday
October 15
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
Story
Tagline
Hacker, Inventor, Maker, Mandalorian, Jedi Knight, Chronicler
Education
  • Florida Atlantic University
    Computer Engineering, present
  • Indian River Community College
    Computer Science
Links
Used to be nice. Now it is just dirty and dilapidated. One of the employees is extremely friendly, though.
Quality: GoodAppeal: Poor to fairService: Very good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Live this place. It has changed a little lately, especially the salsa, but that's life. GET THE NACHOS!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
I avoid this place. It is usually crowded and loud and I am usually seated near either a group of screaming children or loud drunk people. Find a smaller, less travelled place for more... real seafood.
Food: Very goodDecor: Very goodService: Poor to fair
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
I don't know why everyone else has a problem. I've eaten here several times and never had an issue. The decor isn't my taste, but is still nicely done. Last time, the waitress forgot to offer us margaritas, but we didn't claim our free mozzarella sticks because we don't drink anyway. :3
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very goodService: Very good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
21 reviews
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Map
Map
Fantastic food and service. Come for an early lunch, though, or it will be awful crowded.
Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Hot, fresh pizza cheap. Can't complain.
Food: Very goodDecor: Very goodService: Very good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Fantastic! My family complained that it didn't seen "authentic", but I loved it.
Food: ExcellentDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago