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Cypress Trails Equestrian Center
Horseback Riding Service
Today 9AM–5PM
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Oh how nice... Fall is finally here with cooler weather, and the horses are feeling great.  We've got 4 new ones... come and meet them.  And, of course, RIDE, REALLY RIDE!!!
Darolyn and the gang
21415 Cypresswood Dr, Humble, TX 77338
3
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17 comments
 
What a sweet letter. It gives me such heart in trying times such as these. And it is good to look up and see my friends stream thru my gates willing to get dirty and help clean up this mess.
God Bless you and your child. I love you all.
Darolyn
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21415 Cypresswood Dr Humble, TX 77338
21415 Cypresswood DriveUSTexasHumble77338
(281) 446-7232horseridingfun.com
Horseback Riding Service, Horse Riding School
Horseback Riding Service
Horse Riding School
Horse Trainer
Horse Boarding Stable
Today 9AM–5PM
Sunday 9AM–5PMMonday 9AM–5PMTuesday 9AM–5PMWednesday 9AM–5PMThursday 9AM–5PMFriday 9AM–5PMSaturday 9AM–5PM
Enjoy a trail or lunch ride on wooded trails along Cypress Creek or learn how to ride with our private lessons conducted on our trails. We also provide endurance competition training for you and/or your horse, and horse boarding.
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Review Summary
3.8
195 reviews
5 star
114 reviews
4 star
23 reviews
3 star
7 reviews
2 star
8 reviews
1 star
43 reviews
"Thanks Cypress Trails for a great experience and helping out a new rider!"
"We took a few kids out for a birthday trail ride and expected a fun time."
"Totally recommend this place for horseback riding!"
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Danielle Montross
a week ago
I know the videos that have been going around of the horses drowning are sad and horrible, but this could have been avoided. PLEASE DO NOT DONATE OR SUPPORT THIS PLACE. I used to ride here when I was young and the care for the horses is non existent. The owner knows that her barn floods easily and should have been out there throughout the night evacuating the horses. I know that many boarders at this center actually took their horses the night before as a precaution. In fact I believe there is an equestrian center right next door that would have been more than happy to take the horses on before the flood started, since they are there now waiting for the waters to recede. This person has set up a go fund me, and I encourage you not to donate. The neighboring farm has reported that many of the horse are underweight and have saddle sores, and conditions that have gone untreated. And PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE do not ever board your horse here.
• • •
Response from the owner - a week ago
There is a "haters campaign" directed toward us. Here is the TRUTH. Cypress Trails does have plans for the evacuation of horses. In 2015 there were 2 evacuations which took place, which in the end were not required after all. Mon 18th April. 2am - Darolyn had been regularly checking the internet flood gauges and rainfall sites from midnight onwards. Up until 2am everything was still ok with the levels the river was at about 55'. 12 ft. Over normal. 3am - 4" fell, the river incredibly rose to about 62' at this point, I could move 5 vehicles and 3 trailers out, or I could move horses, I chose horses. By Tuesday, I lost all of my vehicles. 3:30 AM The horses were moved out of the Arena to stalls in the House/Barn & North pastures by the river to House/Barn (higher ground). Darolyn saddled up to collect the N. pasture horses which followed her into the barn, then when they were being collected with halters, the horses spooked & broke out of the barn. Running into the flood water on the south side, the current scattered the herd of 10. Several horses got tangled in the cable fencing of the Arena Paddock due to the level of the water. These were later seen on the TV. Darolyn & an employee, Hoku, swam to the Arena to rescue horses, they were only just able to swim there as current too strong to go back. Hoku, sitting on a fence, held the horse, Amber's head above water until the water got a foot higher & she was able to disentangle herself from the fencing she had gotten in. 5am – to the west upon the Cypress Creek watershed, 13 to 15"s had fallen. Another 4"s fell here, the river now at 65' (nearly 2' above the river bank). The law enforcement arrived with rescue boats, their priority was to rescue people and not horses. Darolyn and Hoku were rescued from the Arena where they had been stuck after swimming there 2.5 hours earlier. The TV pictures of horses stuck in the floods now came from around this time. No horses were tied to any fences or poles but some horses were entangled in cable fences now underwater. (All but one got out.) 7 AM There were no horses in the single story barn which can be seen with just its roof above the water, all these horses had been safely evacuated much earlier. Confusion on this occurred because there is what is call a "barn" under Darolyn's house. 11am - the river now 6' above its banks, in a boat I supervised volunteers helping to rescue horses from the south pastures (which was the high ground) of the ranch. Justin Nelzen, Devan Horn, Mark Jensen and many others contributed to heroic rescues throughout the day as they snagged horses out of the currents and got them to safety. 2: PM after Corrie Patrick, Tracy Taylor, and Krista Mohn had pushed 20 plus horses through nearby woods to the neighbors. A group of 6 or 7 horses broke away from being almost contained at the neighbors ranch and returned to the farm. When they reached their home trails and made their way to the house/barn, two split off for the evacuation area on the road and were caught, two headed toward the barn, and two ended up getting swept into the creek. Almost to safety, One of the barn direction horses failed to go in the barn and, he too, was swept in the creek. Devan Horn ended up seeing him caught in bank brush and went in the creek and guided him to safety. The other two are two of the missing ones. 4 PM Later in the day the final 12-14 horses in the house barn were swum to safety with the aid of a power boat and rider for guiding. All horses were guided to the South pasture edge where the water was shallow enough for them to walk, and then to the access road and a waiting trailer. The massive amounts of rain in the west water shed (12"-17") contributed to the rapid rise in the river level, as well as water released from the Conroe dam. Prior to this event, There have only been 2 horses lost to flooding at Cypress Trails back in 2002. No horses were tied up and left in the flood water.
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Carol Hayden
a week ago
I have just reviewed the horrific videos of over 100 horse fearing for their lives as them struggle to keep from drowning. The negligence of the stable owners and employees is inexcusable. This is not their first rodeo of that farm flooding. An exit strategy to move horse to safety was not in place or adhered to. This us not rocket scientist folks nor your first rodeo What should happen immediately: A petition to close this business immediately, arrest and persecute the owners and employees for negligence, and immediate removal of all hieses, find new homes for those horses owned by stable owner, and restitution to all who lost their horse or horses , and that the stable owner be banned from ever owning a horse or boarding horses ever for the rest of her life.
• • •
Response from the owner - a week ago
There is a "haters campaign" directed toward us. Here is the TRUTH. Cypress Trails does have plans for the evacuation of horses. In 2015 there were 2 evacuations which took place, which in the end were not required after all. Mon 18th April. 2am - Darolyn had been regularly checking the internet flood gauges and rainfall sites from midnight onwards. Up until 2am everything was still ok with the levels the river was at about 55'. 12 ft. Over normal. 3am - 4" fell, the river incredibly rose to about 62' at this point, I could move 5 vehicles and 3 trailers out, or I could move horses, I chose horses. By Tuesday, I lost all of my vehicles. 3:30 AM The horses were moved out of the Arena to stalls in the House/Barn & North pastures by the river to House/Barn (higher ground). Darolyn saddled up to collect the N. pasture horses which followed her into the barn, then when they were being collected with halters, the horses spooked & broke out of the barn. Running into the flood water on the south side, the current scattered the herd of 10. Several horses got tangled in the cable fencing of the Arena Paddock due to the level of the water. These were later seen on the TV. Darolyn & an employee, Hoku, swam to the Arena to rescue horses, they were only just able to swim there as current too strong to go back. Hoku, sitting on a fence, held the horse, Amber's head above water until the water got a foot higher & she was able to disentangle herself from the fencing she had gotten in. 5am – to the west upon the Cypress Creek watershed, 13 to 15"s had fallen. Another 4"s fell here, the river now at 65' (nearly 2' above the river bank). The law enforcement arrived with rescue boats, their priority was to rescue people and not horses. Darolyn and Hoku were rescued from the Arena where they had been stuck after swimming there 2.5 hours earlier. The TV pictures of horses stuck in the floods now came from around this time. No horses were tied to any fences or poles but some horses were entangled in cable fences now underwater. (All but one got out.) 7 AM There were no horses in the single story barn which can be seen with just its roof above the water, all these horses had been safely evacuated much earlier. Confusion on this occurred because there is what is call a "barn" under Darolyn's house. 11am - the river now 6' above its banks, in a boat I supervised volunteers helping to rescue horses from the south pastures (which was the high ground) of the ranch. Justin Nelzen, Devan Horn, Mark Jensen and many others contributed to heroic rescues throughout the day as they snagged horses out of the currents and got them to safety. 2: PM after Corrie Patrick, Tracy Taylor, and Krista Mohn had pushed 20 plus horses through nearby woods to the neighbors. A group of 6 or 7 horses broke away from being almost contained at the neighbors ranch and returned to the farm. When they reached their home trails and made their way to the house/barn, two split off for the evacuation area on the road and were caught, two headed toward the barn, and two ended up getting swept into the creek. Almost to safety, One of the barn direction horses failed to go in the barn and, he too, was swept in the creek. Devan Horn ended up seeing him caught in bank brush and went in the creek and guided him to safety. The other two are two of the missing ones. 4 PM Later in the day the final 12-14 horses in the house barn were swum to safety with the aid of a power boat and rider for guiding. All horses were guided to the South pasture edge where the water was shallow enough for them to walk, and then to the access road and a waiting trailer. The massive amounts of rain in the west water shed (12"-17") contributed to the rapid rise in the river level, as well as water released from the Conroe dam. Prior to this event, There have only been 2 horses lost to flooding at Cypress Trails back in 2002. No horses were tied up and left in the flood water.
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Lolly Ward
a week ago
They love and care for their horses and all those they board there. They may need to make some changes but I would still recommend them. If you have to board your horses, pets, hell even your senior parents or kids, ANYWHERE... wouldn't you go check on them, pick them up, not leave them to chance when pending storms and floods are coming. Just common sense. But, that's just me. Good luck Cypress Trails.
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Michelle Cartagena
3 weeks ago
I love this place. They are all super friendly and safe. The trails are natures best and the horses are so well cared for! My experience has always made awesome memories with them 🐎🌷
Response from the owner - a week ago
Thanks so much, I'll look forward to seeing you back!
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Jamie Holder
a week ago
I can't explain the horror I felt as watched their horses struggle for their lives. I know what a flash flood is. The news reported for several day that we were in for heavy rain. You can't keep using the excuse that it happened so fast. You had days to prepare! If you know you are in a flood zone, you should have an evacuation plan. Even with so many horses! If you are going to run a business with them, they should have a way to transport them in the case of a natural disaster. Especially since this has happened before. You should know better. Shame on you! It will be long time before I will be able to stop picturing those poor animals. I adore horses, much more than the average person. I, unfortunately, can not afford them. But if I could I would have plans in place! You will never get any business from me and I will make sure that everyone I know will know of your negligence.
• • •
Response from the owner - a week ago
There is a "haters campaign" directed toward us. Here is the TRUTH. Cypress Trails does have plans for the evacuation of horses. In 2015 there were 2 evacuations which took place, which in the end were not required after all. Mon 18th April. 2am - Darolyn had been regularly checking the internet flood gauges and rainfall sites from midnight onwards. Up until 2am everything was still ok with the levels the river was at about 55'. 12 ft. Over normal. 3am - 4" fell, the river incredibly rose to about 62' at this point, I could move 5 vehicles and 3 trailers out, or I could move horses, I chose horses. By Tuesday, I lost all of my vehicles. 3:30 AM The horses were moved out of the Arena to stalls in the House/Barn & North pastures by the river to House/Barn (higher ground). Darolyn saddled up to collect the N. pasture horses which followed her into the barn, then when they were being collected with halters, the horses spooked & broke out of the barn. Running into the flood water on the south side, the current scattered the herd of 10. Several horses got tangled in the cable fencing of the Arena Paddock due to the level of the water. These were later seen on the TV. Darolyn & an employee, Hoku, swam to the Arena to rescue horses, they were only just able to swim there as current too strong to go back. Hoku, sitting on a fence, held the horse, Amber's head above water until the water got a foot higher & she was able to disentangle herself from the fencing she had gotten in. 5am – to the west upon the Cypress Creek watershed, 13 to 15"s had fallen. Another 4"s fell here, the river now at 65' (nearly 2' above the river bank). The law enforcement arrived with rescue boats, their priority was to rescue people and not horses. Darolyn and Hoku were rescued from the Arena where they had been stuck after swimming there 2.5 hours earlier. The TV pictures of horses stuck in the floods now came from around this time. No horses were tied to any fences or poles but some horses were entangled in cable fences now underwater. (All but one got out.) 7 AM There were no horses in the single story barn which can be seen with just its roof above the water, all these horses had been safely evacuated much earlier. Confusion on this occurred because there is what is call a "barn" under Darolyn's house. 11am - the river now 6' above its banks, in a boat I supervised volunteers helping to rescue horses from the south pastures (which was the high ground) of the ranch. Justin Nelzen, Devan Horn, Mark Jensen and many others contributed to heroic rescues throughout the day as they snagged horses out of the currents and got them to safety. 2: PM after Corrie Patrick, Tracy Taylor, and Krista Mohn had pushed 20 plus horses through nearby woods to the neighbors. A group of 6 or 7 horses broke away from being almost contained at the neighbors ranch and returned to the farm. When they reached their home trails and made their way to the house/barn, two split off for the evacuation area on the road and were caught, two headed toward the barn, and two ended up getting swept into the creek. Almost to safety, One of the barn direction horses failed to go in the barn and, he too, was swept in the creek. Devan Horn ended up seeing him caught in bank brush and went in the creek and guided him to safety. The other two are two of the missing ones. 4 PM Later in the day the final 12-14 horses in the house barn were swum to safety with the aid of a power boat and rider for guiding. All horses were guided to the South pasture edge where the water was shallow enough for them to walk, and then to the access road and a waiting trailer. The massive amounts of rain in the west water shed (12"-17") contributed to the rapid rise in the river level, as well as water released from the Conroe dam. Prior to this event, There have only been 2 horses lost to flooding at Cypress Trails back in 2002. No horses were tied up and left in the flood water.
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Justin Johnson
a week ago
Absolutely negligent owner of not only the horses but the dogs as well as human life. She should be jailed! I personally have lived in the area most of my life and her endangering the horses during storms is repeated so often that is beyond disgusting now. How many floods and how many deaths does it take for an official to not have Darolyn in their pocketbook?
Response from the owner - a week ago
There is a "haters campaign" directed toward us. Here is the TRUTH. Cypress Trails does have plans for the evacuation of horses. In 2015 there were 2 evacuations which took place, which in the end were not required after all. Mon 18th April. 2am - Darolyn had been regularly checking the internet flood gauges and rainfall sites from midnight onwards. Up until 2am everything was still ok with the levels the river was at about 55'. 12 ft. Over normal. 3am - 4" fell, the river incredibly rose to about 62' at this point, I could move 5 vehicles and 3 trailers out, or I could move horses, I chose horses. By Tuesday, I lost all of my vehicles. 3:30 AM The horses were moved out of the Arena to stalls in the House/Barn & North pastures by the river to House/Barn (higher ground). Darolyn saddled up to collect the N. pasture horses which followed her into the barn, then when they were being collected with halters, the horses spooked & broke out of the barn. Running into the flood water on the south side, the current scattered the herd of 10. Several horses got tangled in the cable fencing of the Arena Paddock due to the level of the water. These were later seen on the TV. Darolyn & an employee, Hoku, swam to the Arena to rescue horses, they were only just able to swim there as current too strong to go back. Hoku, sitting on a fence, held the horse, Amber's head above water until the water got a foot higher & she was able to disentangle herself from the fencing she had gotten in. 5am – to the west upon the Cypress Creek watershed, 13 to 15"s had fallen. Another 4"s fell here, the river now at 65' (nearly 2' above the river bank). The law enforcement arrived with rescue boats, their priority was to rescue people and not horses. Darolyn and Hoku were rescued from the Arena where they had been stuck after swimming there 2.5 hours earlier. The TV pictures of horses stuck in the floods now came from around this time. No horses were tied to any fences or poles but some horses were entangled in cable fences now underwater. (All but one got out.) 7 AM There were no horses in the single story barn which can be seen with just its roof above the water, all these horses had been safely evacuated much earlier. Confusion on this occurred because there is what is call a "barn" under Darolyn's house. 11am - the river now 6' above its banks, in a boat I supervised volunteers helping to rescue horses from the south pastures (which was the high ground) of the ranch. Justin Nelzen, Devan Horn, Mark Jensen and many others contributed to heroic rescues throughout the day as they snagged horses out of the currents and got them to safety. 2: PM after Corrie Patrick, Tracy Taylor, and Krista Mohn had pushed 20 plus horses through nearby woods to the neighbors. A group of 6 or 7 horses broke away from being almost contained at the neighbors ranch and returned to the farm. When they reached their home trails and made their way to the house/barn, two split off for the evacuation area on the road and were caught, two headed toward the barn, and two ended up getting swept into the creek. Almost to safety, One of the barn direction horses failed to go in the barn and, he too, was swept in the creek. Devan Horn ended up seeing him caught in bank brush and went in the creek and guided him to safety. The other two are two of the missing ones. 4 PM Later in the day the final 12-14 horses in the house barn were swum to safety with the aid of a power boat and rider for guiding. All horses were guided to the South pasture edge where the water was shallow enough for them to walk, and then to the access road and a waiting trailer. The massive amounts of rain in the west water shed (12"-17") contributed to the rapid rise in the river level, as well as water released from the Conroe dam. Prior to this event, There have only been 2 horses lost to flooding at Cypress Trails back in 2002. No horses were tied up and left in the flood water.
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Roger Osburn
in the last week
This review is: (1) to comment on my experience at Cypress Trails and (2) to refute the republication of inaccurate information about Cypress Trails following the recent historic flood. First, I have been riding at Cypress Trails for 2 years--first as a rider, then as a horse lessee, and more recently as a horse owner/boarder. I doubt that one can find many, if any, PUBLIC STABLES in the world that have better quality, or better cared for, horses. Where else can a non-horse owner pay a very reasonable amount for a 1 to 3 hour trail ride (or more) on a beautiful Arabian horse that competes in endurance races? Particularly within a major city (a couple of miles from an international airport) but still be able to ride through miles of beautiful greenbelt under a canopy of trees? Horses and riders are matched to the ability of the rider as well as the length and type of the ride contracted. I was pleasantly amazed when I discovered this stable. I believe the stable owner provides an unmatched service to the community--making such recreation available to the public as well as her role in mentoring, sponsoring, teaching, and providing jobs to young people who learn to love horsemanship and how to take care of others (through taking care of the horses.) Second, during the flood several people lost their life, hundreds were rescued, and hundreds more had their homes flooded. The news reported this was a 500 year event because of the amount of rain and the HUGE area involved. Other stables that kept horses had horses that died during the flood but yet only Cypress Trails was targeted (unfairly in my opinion) because of the media coverage of some of the horse rescues. At Cypress Trails, the weather is monitored and horses are evacuated pursuant to a written evacuation plan (which has been provided to friends, boarders, etc.) when it appears there is significant risk of the stables being flooded. I understand that typically there are about 2 evacuations each year--as was the case in 2015--without loss of any horses. In 2001 or 2002, I understand there was an evacuation commenced when the owners were away, horses got spooked, and I believe a couple ran away and ultimately died. An evacuation decision requires judgment based upon a reasonable forecast to the public (i.e. to Cypress Trails in this case) of the amount and timing of rain. A forecast of the extent and timing of this rain event was not provided and probably not known in advance by anyone. Moreover, Conroe Dam flood gates were opened without advance warning that night. The massive rain plus the opening of those flood gates basically caused the Cypress Creek water depth to shoot straight up. NOT A USUAL OCCURRENCE. A USGS graph publicly available on the internet of the flooding event at Cypress Creek (described as a hydrograph by a geologist who responded to a Houston Chronicle writer) documented that within 4 hours the water level had risen over 20 feet. With something this massive happening, it was not possible to execute the evacuation plan the Stable Owner had in place even though she and an employee tried starting about 3am and at risk of their own life to get the horses to safety. Thanks to the heroic efforts of some people later in the day very few of the approximately 80 horses kept at the stables ended up dying--1 confirmed death and 3 listed as missing per the latest posting that I saw. One of the horses shown on TV being rescued was mine. I live an hour away in dry non-rush hour traffic and there was no way for me to get to the stables to help. It broke my heart seeing video of the rescues but not for one second do I think the Stable Owner was to blame for anything that happened to the horses. I know she loves the horses and I know how well the Cypress Trails horses are cared for.
• • •
Response from the owner - in the last week
Dear Roger, and others that have been supportive of our operation...thanks so much for your honest assessment of this challenging situation. It's been tough on many levels. I appreciate your sincere response. Darolyn
william lodato's profile photo
william lodato
a week ago
HATERS SHE SAYS! People have risked there lives getting your horses out of the water. I have yet too see a thank you from Darolin peosonaly to theae heros. All i see is HATERS and a little recognition for the heroic efforts to save your ass. I have worked, rode, boarded my horse, thrown hay at these stables. My wife even worked in her office. So when i say this place is not a place where 86 horses should be, I mean it. The pastures are dirt, no grass. They dump the horse crap from the barn in the pastures to add to the already nasty living conditions. She has set up make shift stall to create a loop hole in the law that allwos her to house this many horses on her land. These so called stalls are 2.5ft wide by about 5 to 6ft long whith a rope at the back to prevent the horse from backing out. A lot of HATERS blame you. I dont blame them for doing so. You have had close call after close call due to your bad judgment and it bit you in the ass this time. If it was not for Justin and the others that risked there lives to save your horses. Half you heard would be dead. Do not suport this place or ever board you horses here. It is not safe for you or your animals. YOU SHOULD BE ASHAMED OF YOUR SELF CYPRESS TRAILS. Instead of pointing fingers you shoud not only be thanking the comunity that came and helped you. Instead of calling us HATERS after many of us suported you. Again I an a former volinteer, boarder, suporter, wrangler at this facility. I SUGEST ALL THAT ARE THINKING TO ATTEND CYPRESS TRAILS DONT. LET THIS BUSSINESS FISEL OUT AND FORCE DAROLIN TO CLOSE THE DOORS FOREVER.
• • •
Response from the owner - a week ago
I have thanked people personally and publicly many times for their efforts. The small steals you mention are simply feeding stalls that the horses are in for less than an hour twice a day as they are grained. So they are getting their portion of feed. If you really worked here you would know that. Also, there has never been 86 horses here. We lost one horse in 2001, when I was out of town speaking at a TETRA Convention. I closely monitor the creek and the weather every day. Read Scott Saccos review on this page for an honest assessment of someone I've never even met.