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Jeremy Fitzhardinge
Works at Exablox
Attended University of Technology, Sydney
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Jeremy Fitzhardinge

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New Office! 
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I've seen some of the things that some people have done with Cat 6. Just remember to wash your hands afterwards.
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great shots!
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Barraba Sunset
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Where abouts? My family-in-law lives out here now, but I first came here to see Halley's Comet as a child...
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Zooko Wilcox-O'Hearn originally shared:
 
I saw Yoshi Kohno present http://autosec.org yesterday, and it scared the daylights out of me. I'm never going near a modern car again.

Their work is comprehensive and so hard to summarize, but basically they demonstrated, among many other things, remotely rooting your car (over the cellular network) and installing malware on it which would later kill you—such as by disabling your brakes the next time it detected that you were travelling fast downhill—and then erase itself to eliminate the evidence.

Understand that they did this with a real, unmodified, mainstream sedan that they bought retail. It didn't kill the test pilot in the test because they did it on an airport runway at 20 mph instead of downhill at 60 mph. (The test pilot stopped the car by engaging the parking brake. Yoshi mentioned that he has been told newer and better cars have computer-controlled parking brakes.)
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Colin, it's a pet parrot of some kind, at our local cafe.
Morel, it's perched sideways on some bamboo, and has a little harness/leash thing on.
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Have him in circles
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Jeremy Fitzhardinge

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My brother gives us a tour of the innards of the Sydney Opera House.
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Foal, Barraba
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Rach got bit. A bit.
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Jeremy Fitzhardinge

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Ingo Molnar originally shared:
 
I'm increasingly pessimistic whether the Euro can survive in most of Europe.

Europe is currently suffering from the two strongest forces in the Universe: the unstoppable force of exponentially compounding interest combined with the unstoppable force of human stupidity.

Europe is repeating the mistakes of the Great Depression, without realizing it.

Neither Merkel nor the other EU leaders seem to understand the basic economic problem, the elephant in the room: that after a decade of free/private market driven capital bubble, the built-in gold-standard alike automatic debt deflation of the Euro (a design error, unique to the Euro) is fatal and is killing the productivity of Eurozone economies one by one.

For those who think that it was lazy southeners having an easy life and collecting too much welfare causing the crisis, and that it could be solved easily if only they worked harder, spent less and saved more, here's an eye-opener analysis of hard data about European productivity, capital flow and the true roots of the crisis:

http://streetlightblog.blogspot.com/2011/10/where-exactly-are-those-lazy-southern.html

http://streetlightblog.blogspot.com/2011/09/what-really-caused-eurozone-crisis-part.html

I hope Merkel has plans in place ready to secretly print billions of Deutschmarks and distribute them over a single weekend, now that she has wrecked the Euro.

I'm sure plans are already under way for new Drachma bills - and Berlusconi should be well advised to put plans in place for an Euro exit, a new Lira and a default as well. I hope that the inevitable human casualties, already in the thousands, will be as low as possible.

Defaulting on debt certainly worked better for Iceland and Argentina - than paying for bubble debts, coupling to the Euro and engaging in masochistic, self-destructive acts of public sector austerity worked for Greece, Ireland and Estonia ...

As for our American friends exposed to the fallout of trillions of dollars of CDS margin calls cascading around the globe: I hope the Fed and the FDIC did their homework and mapped the outcome correctly and planned for it - Bank of America's rumoured near bankruptcy must have influenced the recent emergency shifting of 75 trillion dollars worth of derivatives from the uninsured investment banking side to the FDIC-insured side ...

Most European banks will go bankrupt and will be nationalized (or looting of the public will continue in form of bailouts) once the Euro exits happen. There will be very visible bank runs in the Euro-exiting countries.

Merkel and Germany will eventually have to realize that it will be (much) harder to compete against 30-40% cheaper Italian, Spanish and Greek production than against the current, artificially strong, Euro based Italian, Spanish and Greek production.
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+Ingo Wechsung Fertility rates of Germany and France are quite different, so are retirement ages.
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Steven Levy originally shared:
 
The world will miss John McCarthy, who coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" pioneered the LISP language and headed the Stanford AI lab. He also saw, really really early, how people would communicate with computers. I first met him while researching "Hackers" (he didn't have much patience with my questions) and later he figured into "Crypto" as he played a key role in the Public Key saga. And during my Google research I came across a video of a company party in Palo Alto, probably early 1999. Late in the party people were congregating in the kitchen, listening to Prof McCarthy. So long, Uncle John.
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Rob Pike originally shared:
 
I got this note from John Ritchie, Dennis's brother:

Dear Rob--

As Dennis's siblings, Lynn, John, and Bill Ritchie--on behalf of the entire Ritchie family--we wanted to convey to all of you how deeply moved, astonished, and appreciative we are of the loving tributes to Dennis that we have been reading. We can confirm what we keep hearing again and again: Dennis was an unfailingly kind, sweet, unassuming, and generous brother--and of course a complete geek. He had a hilariously dry sense of humor, and a keen appreciation for life's absurdities--though his world view was entirely devoid of cynicism or mean-spiritedness.

We are terribly sad to have lost him, but touched beyond words to realize what a mark he made on the world, and how well his gentle personality--beyond his accomplishments--seems to be understood.

Thank you.
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Jeremy Fitzhardinge

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I'm not sure I find this completely convincing. In particular:

"Van Elburg calculates that it should cause the neutrinos to arrive 32 nanoseconds early. But this must be doubled because the same error occurs at each end of the experiment. So the total correction is 64 nanoseconds, almost exactly what the OPERA team observed."

Surely the error would be in the same direction at both ends, thereby cancelling out? Why would it be 32ns in opposite directions to make a 64ns delta?

Also, the effect should depend on where the satellites are relative to the experiment on the ground - in particular whether they're approaching or receding, which would cause a range of time variations.
Perry Metzger originally shared:
 
Unsure if this is correct, but I've heard similar possible explanations speculated on from other people...
The relativistic motion of clocks on board GPS satellites exactly accounts for the superluminal effect in the OPERA experiment, says physicist Ronald van
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Yes, about syncing. The article seems to assume that the GPS time is used more or less as-is from the air, but I'd assumed they used it to do drift correction on already synchronized clocks (which looks like 352ns since they synchronized the clocks in 2006).

Direct detection of Dark Matter would indeed be a very interesting outcome. But the Pioneer Anomaly shows how long it can take for mundane explanations for mysterious results to be published.
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Have him in circles
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Employment
  • Exablox
    2011 - present
  • Citrix Systems
    2007
  • Xen.org
    2005
  • Digeo
    2001
  • Moxi
    2000
  • Raidtec
    1998
  • Mylex
    1998
  • Softway
    1991
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  • University of Technology, Sydney
    Computer Systems Engineering
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