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Aaron Day
All cheese and daisies!
All cheese and daisies!
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Aaron Day's posts

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So, Star Wars Armada came out yesterday. Considering that the scale and combat of SW is pretty close to 40k (mega-sized ships and fighters) means this might be a good system for running BFG-style combat. 

I'll try to post size comparisons between BFG and SWA ships next week. 
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I talk about the second RPG ever published and how it relates to Dave's earliest Blackmoor rules. 

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I talk about three different methods of resolving combat in early D&D and how I use all three of them.

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I made this chart to help me get a handle on how Fly Maneuvers and Speed relate to each other. Find the chart for the speed you are travelling and compare the row for your current distance and the column for your desired distance. The number is the total Fly Maneuvers you need to get there. You can split those Flys over multiple turns. 

So a if you are Speed 3 and at Long range, with will take 3 Flys to get to Short range and 4 to get to Close. 
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How the ideas of player skill and a lack of player knowledge combined forces in the earliest days of D&D. 

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A look at how dungeons changed gaming and why it still matters today. 

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Thieves Guild, an old game you've probably never played.

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Talking about Thieves Guild, the game where everyone's a thief. 

8 Reasons You Should Use OD&D-style Hit Dice

OD&D originally used as system where characters didn't automatically get a hit die at every level. Fighters did but magic users got one every other level or so. Here's why you should use this system along with a rule from Empire of the Petal Throne where you reroll your hit points every level. This one's for +Michael Desing 

1-All characters start with a full hit die. Yep, this one is pretty minor but it’s nice for those thieves and magic-users who aren’t starting with fewer hit points the Peter the Peasant. 

2-Since hit dice aren’t tied to level, there’s no limit to how they can advance. They can advance quickly or slowly, start high and move up slower or even have the rate change once a certain level is hit. A DM has complete freedom to design any progression a new class requires. You don’t have to use fixed hit point per level after a certain point since you can give out a dice every other level or two every three levels, etc.

3-Since a fighter will be getting more, not better, hit dice, there’s also no need for that special rule in AD&D that limits Con bonuses of non-fighters. Fighters will automatically get more advantage out of a high Con without any special rules. 

4-Since the number of hit dice is a function of a character’s combat ability, you can use this number to determine chance to hit. A magic-user with 3 hit dice fights as a 3rd level fighter. Boom, you’re done. If you’re one of those Ascending AC guys, you can just use the number of HD as the attack bonus. No need for an extra chart. Attack bonus will scale smoothly and taper off at upper levels when hit dice also slow down.

5-Since you reroll your hit point total every level, you can give starting characters bonus hit points without affecting their hit point totals at high levels. For instance, first level character could start with a number of hit points equal to their Con, but since they will only use their rolled hit point total if it is higher (as per EPT), they will stay with those hit points until their rolled total exceeds their current total. So fighter would be getting new hit points around 4th level, magic users much later. All without ending up with boatloads of hit points later on. It flattens the curve, if that’s your thing. 

6-The bizarre multi-classing rules in OD&D work perfectly. When you gain a level of fighter, you roll your fighter hit dice and when you gain a level of magic-user you roll your MU hit dice. You only actually gain hit points when the roll exceeds your current total. Doing it this way means there is no need to limit multiclassers to splitting XP evenly or even to declare that a character will multiclass at the start of the campaign. An elf (or any character really) can decide to multiclass at first or eighth level without any problem or special rules.

7- Since only the number of hit dice are listed on the table, there’s really no reason to limit them to d6s. Instead, you can change the size of the hit dice based on any criteria, such as the character’s race. 

A pixie could have d4 hit dice, a hobbit d6, humans, d8, ogres d10 and giants d12 or more. Now all you do is substitute the race’s hit die into the class’ table and the character’s hit points are scaled to the creature while maintaining the ratio of hit points among the various classes. An Ogre MU would get d10 hit dice when any other magic user would (about one every two levels) whereas a pixie fighter would get d4 every level, the same rate as any other fighter. All without special rules or the need to adjust ability scores or hand out bonus hit dice.

8-Since you are rerolling the total hit dice, you can also change the type of hit dice during the life of a character. Now a giant fighter can start off as a human-sized teenager with d8 hit dice then, after a few years of game time, can switch to d10s and, much later, switch to d12 when the giant is full sized. Works for dragons too. Since the switch is age dependent, it can happen when the character is 2nd level or 8th. 

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Probably old news to you guys but I made a short video about how encounter balancing works in older versions of D&D.
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