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CB Droege
Works at Southern State Community College
Attended NKU
Lives in Loveland
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CB Droege

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Would you rather read my flash fiction with your earballs?

Here's the feed link:

manawaker.com/feed/podcast

It'll be on iTunes soon.
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My earballs are happy. Subscribed through feedly.
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CB Droege

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The first thing I thought of when I saw the title for this video is that Superheroes and PCs are similar because they have widely disparate powers.

In both of these story forms, the major characters are usually incredibly powerful people (at least if we look at the most common form of both of these things: Superhero comics and adventure role-playing games; it starts to break down if we look at "Fun Home" and "Everyone is John", but that's a digression). That's true in many genres, but in comics and Table-top RPGs the characters are not only powerful, but they are often powerful in very different ways, and those differences are very important to the story of each character.

For me as an author, what this means, both in writing table-top stories and superhero stories, is that any conflict must be carefully crafted to match the abilities of the specific character(s) who will be the protagonist of that conflict.

Superman conflicts are very different from Green Arrow conflicts, which are very different from Spider-Man conflicts, and this is more about the characters than it is about what the author wants to do. The type of conflict they can manage is going to be more about the types of superpowered abilities they've been crafted with. (Just think, for simple example, of how different the classic 'rooftop chase' conflict is for each of these characters.)

In that same way, as a GM, I would craft a very different challenge for a session in which I know there will be a single level 5 rogue character  than I would for a session which I know will have 3 wizards and a barbarian, all at level 10. And, I don't just mean that the challenge would need to be more difficult because some characters are more powerful, but that they would have to be conflicts of entirely different nature.

But the things Mike says about the characters in both forms having their own agency, that also makes sense. :)
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I painted this small work entitled "Countless Screaming Argonauts" on the occasion of +Arnold Cassell 's wedding. When he later visited, and thanked me in-person for the gift, I mentioned off hand that I wished I had made two, so that I would also have one. Several weeks later, I received in the post this mirrored forgery with added detail. It sits now above my bookshelves.
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I do like a "They Might Be Giants" song reference!
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If you're going to be at Cincy Comicon this weekend, make sure to stop by the Manawaker Studios table (in the G section). I'll be there, with +Amanda Troutman, chatting with fans, signing books, and demoing Dragon Line.
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CB Droege

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Frozen wasn't so much a critique, I think, but a non-comedic parody, the difference being its subtlety. Both critique and parody have as their job the subversion of tropes, but a critique subverts with an exploratory scalpel, and a parody subverts with a destructive baseball bat.
While some of the subversions in Frozen are more subtle than others, the big one, the one at the end with the true love, is specifically designed to shock, not explore. It was built like a joke: It had a set-up, a turn, and a punch. It wasn't funny, it was triumphant, which is an accomplishment in itself, but it didn't really show us anything other than that we could be tricked.
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That's an intresting opinion. I personally saw the whole "It's really her sister who'll break the spell"- thing a mile away, becuase their relationship was the most emotionally affecting thing in the movie to me. But then again, I watch My Little Pony: Freindship is Magic, so I am more keenly aware of that "sisterhood" stuff then some. I am intrested in Disney doing more movies that talk about relationships that people actually have- siblings, freinds, grandparents ectera, becuase the way the've handled or mishandled romance over the years kind of leaves me cold. Nobody has a relationship with somebody they met while in an enchanted sleep, but people actually have sisters, so maybe if Disney continiues to talk about relationships like that rather then the ones where two lovers meet becuase of contrived magical circumstances and once married never have any real problems, they might actually actually have something intresting to say. 
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CB Droege

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ERB does Goku's costume and effects better than the hollywood film.
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CB Droege

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Relevant: Space Cadets was a BBC program from about a decade ago, which was a fake space-tourism reality show, in which the show's producers tricked a group of volunteers into thinking that they were in space for five days.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Cadets_(TV_series)
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CB Droege

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Check out the latest Flash Fiction Friday, "Bullseye" on manawaker.com | http://ow.ly/HQYPH
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CB Droege

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I'll go purist, and say that it's only a game if it has rules, objectives, strategic or tactical decisions, and multiple teams or players which all must follow those same rules, and attempt to reach the same objectives. If there is only one 'player' (A.I. can be players) then it is not a game, it is simply interactive text (using "text" in the broad literary sense). By this definition, Mario Kart is a game, but Super Mario Bros. is not because in the former, Bowser plays by the same rules as all other players, and in the later, he does not.

However, I think it's a bit pedantic, and we can use the word two ways, similar to the word "comics".

We use the word "comics" very loosely to define all manner of types of text, but technically, the term only really refers to books full of graphical jokes, of a sort which are very rarely published anymore. Most of what we typically call "comics" is actually more accurately called "Sequential art narrative", but this is really an academic term.

As a literature professor, I am careful to use terms like "Sequential art narrative" and "Interactive narrative" instead of "comic" or "game" when we study these works because it's an academic setting, and one should strive to be accurate in the classroom (in fact, I make distinctions among "interactive art", "interactive verse", and "interactive narrative" - plus all of those with and without the word "digital" - in my classroom), but when I talk to my friends about what I've been filling my leisure time with on the weekends, I talk about "comics" and "games" because that's the expected language, and using the more accurate language would be pedantic in that setting.

Is it important to know the technical difference among all these terms? I think so. Should we be attacking or even correcting others when they use them incorrectly? Probably not outside of a classroom or other discussion in which the distinction is important to the topic at hand. 
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I love your posts because they are so thoroughly thought out. I'm going disagree with the purist approach because it removes at its assertion of only being multiplayer a few of the fundamental reason why humans have games at all.
In every culture we play games. The purpose of play is to mimic survival skills, increase mental and motor functions, and establish relationships with our peers. If it is a product created by a third party for any of all of these purposes then I think it's a game.
However, I love that you use further qualifications when discussing games, art, and literature as that really drives home the meat of what the discussion maybe. "Game" sets the context but the qualifiers identify the content. 
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CB Droege

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Have I ever told you how I believe that a basic living wage should be guaranteed by society to each of its members? Well, I believe that strongly, and it's not because I'm a communist or a super-liberal or whatever, it's because I'm a realist. The day has already come when we don't NEED for everyone to be employed at something to keep us all going. We feel like everyone should have to be employed to be a contributor, but it's not true, and it will not only never again be true, but it's only going to get less and less true. We're entering into a future where it will be possible to support the entire economy on the 'work' of a few percentages of the population, and everyone else will either be unemployed or extraneously employed (which is arguably worse).

Anyway, CGP Grey has made a pretty good video outlining the realistic future of the human-free workforce, and the need to deal with it, though he doesn't point out that a guaranteed wage is basically the only way to deal with it.
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CB Droege

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New flash fiction on the Manawaker Studio blog: Iniquitous Impulses
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Have him in circles
231 people
Ralph de Pagter's profile photo
Vince Volpert's profile photo
Chev Arnold's profile photo
Dalibor Dimovski's profile photo
Ekomovers USA's profile photo
John McDonnell's profile photo
Ian Nicholson's profile photo
Clint Spaeth's profile photo
Jon Toole's profile photo
Education
  • NKU
    Master of Arts in English, 2008 - 2010
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Tagline
Author. English Professor. Gamer.
Introduction
Freelance feature writer. Writing about geek stuff like video games and sci-fi. 

Also: English professor and fantasy author.
Work
Occupation
Author
Employment
  • Southern State Community College
    English Instructor, 2014 - present
  • Manawaker Studio
    Author, 2009 - present
  • Galen College of Nursing
    English Instructor, 2010 - present
  • Icrontic
    Gaming Analyst, 2005 - 2013
  • TGDaily
    Feature Writer, 2010 - 2013
  • Brown Mackie College
    English Instructor, 2004 - 2011
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Loveland