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CAS-Group
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Complex Adaptive Systems Group
Complex Adaptive Systems Group

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Another post about subjective experience, subjectivity and phenomenal consciousness

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New blog post about multicellular life and the origin of cancer, based on this discussion: http://goo.gl/tS5JI

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You are invited ;-)

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ocean, you are so awesome.

"Together with my friend David Castro, we were diving with a large group of Bigeye travellies at Cabo Pulmo National Park, Mexico. Thousands of fish forming a ball during the reproduction courtship. In the afternoon, these fish congregate to form a large spawning aggregation around the reefs of the National Park."
Photo and caption by Octavio Aburto
Location: Cabo Pulmo, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Photo Contest 2012 Entry
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/photo-contest/2012/entries/188944/view/
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And now for the movie of the WHOLE Earth at night, spinning.
http://go.nasa.gov/TJTckV

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How random is social behavior?
Social complexity and Perceptual Landscapes

> In a famous passage of his book The Sciences of the Artificial the sociologist Herbert Simon considers the winding, weaving path of an ant as it makes its journey home across the rugged landscape of a wind- and wave-beaten sandy beach. He notes that, whilst the homebound ant has a clear destination, its progression along the path that leads to it is far from a straight line, due to the numerous obstacles encountered on the way. The example inspires in him this startling observation:

> An ant, viewed as a behaving system, is quite simple. The apparent complexity of its behavior over time is largely a reflection of the complexity of the environment in which it finds itself.

> As Lima & Zollner put it, “we know remarkably little about the sorts of information available to animals at the scale of ecological landscapes, and we know even less about how such information is used in decisions regarding movement”.

> Our goal here is to use the movement dynamics (successive sampling events) of mice to reconstruct the perception they have of their environment, and create a landscape object describing this perception. We call this object perceptual landscape; it is shaped by the deviation of individual mice from a null assumption about their movement across the environment. 

> Figure 3. Perceptual lansdscape for both the complete population and specific individuals. 

> A. 3D rendering of the perceptual landscape of the complete population of wild house mice, showing the discrepancies in occupation density of the different regions of the barn. The inlay is a schematic representation of the barn, with the disposition of the nest boxes and the dividers creating 4 artificial territories. Interestingly, this physical structure is represented accurately in the landscape, with high grounds following the dividers (except between segments A and B), and an elevated plateau around the entrance to the barn, isolated from the rest of the structure. Some of the wells, corresponding to each of the nest boxes, can be seen beneath the landscape.

> B. and C. The perceptual landscapes of a male (id 0006B8C03C) and a female (id 0006B9BAB9) with two very different patterns of spatial activity, displayed as temperature maps; red areas denote a low elevation of the landscape (higher probability of finding the animal), whilst blue areas correspond to higher regions of the landscape (lower probability); the color scaling is the same in both graphs. Despite the two mice having the same core areas (Segment C of the barn), their home ranges differ vastly in that the male concentrates its activity around 4 boxes only, whereas the female's home range extends well beyond this. It can be observed that most of the diffusive motion occurs within the core nest boxes, as opposed to more advective motion outside this area. This may hint to behavioural differences when roaming within or without an animal's territory (part of the home range that is defended).

via +Bruno Gonçalves 

More: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002786?imageURI=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002786.g003

#complexity   #complexityscience   #attentioneconomy  
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