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South Shore Generator Sales and Service
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Customer Service Specialist

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

Answer in-bound calls (up to 50/day or more during times of high demand) from customers and technicians and answer questions over the phone.

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Customer Service Specialist Essential Duties and Responsibilities: * Answer in-bound calls (up to 50/day or more during times of high demand) from customers and technicians and answer questions over the phone. * Gather and prepare documentation regarding repairs and maintenance. * Troubleshoot with the Service Manager to resolve issues with technicians in the field. * The ability to evaluate a situation independently and schedule. * Consider multiple tasks at once and prioritize effectively and efficiently. * Provide customer service excellence for both external and internal customers. * Coordinate and structure service technicians schedule each day (currently 14 with the possibility of more to be added). * Monitor to ensure that work meets quality standards and accuracy. * Consistently carry out the directions of supervisor. * Responsible for cleanliness and organization of work station. * Ability to follow through and up on daily tasks to completion. * Overcome objections or hostility diplomatically. * Perform other duties as assigned in an ever changing and adapting work environment. Additional Qualifications and Responsibilities: * Ability to communicate verbally and in writing in a professional manner. * Ability to work independently and make decisions in the best interest of the customer and the company. * Strong foundation of basic mechanical fundamental theory. * Some knowledge of engine maintenance and troubleshooting to include: air cooled, liquid cooled units, gas, diesel, LP and natural gas fuel systems. * Ability to remain calm in high-stress situations. * Working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite. * Maintaining the integrity of systems and standards. * Previous experience within functional area as assigned. Preferred Qualifications: * Associates Degree and/or experience for 2+ years Physical Demands: While performing the duties of this job, the employee is regularly required to talk and hear; and use hands to manipulate objects or controls. The employee is regularly required to stand and walk. On occasion the incumbent may be required to stoop, bend or reach above the shoulders. The employee must occasionally lift up to 15 pounds. Specific conditions of this job include and are typical of frequent and continuous computer-based work requiring periods of sitting, close vision and ability to adjust focus. Click to Download Application Form

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Below are the pros and cons of two types of emergency electrical generators—the portable type and the larger standby type—and tell you how to decide between them. Emergency generators: Two options With the American power grid becoming less reliable every year, power outages are bound to occur more frequently and last longer. That means you could end up sitting in the dark, sweating without an air conditioner, and eating canned meals while $300 worth of food spoils in your freezer. Meanwhile, your basement could flood since the sump pump is now worthless—and your kids could go crazy without a TV or computer. Power grid problems aside, we all lose electricity occasionally. But when outages become routine, leaving you without electricity for days on end, it’s time to take action by getting a generator. Smaller, portable generators are great for powering the essentials, like the refrigerator and microwave, while large standby generators can power everything in your house. Here is an outline of both types of generators (portable and standby) and both ways to deliver backup power (extension cords and subpanels). Here are the pros and cons of each system. Option 1: Plug-in generators The most basic method of supplying backup power is running a portable generator in your yard, then plugging in extension cords that plug into your appliances. It’s also the least expensive solution since you don’t need to hire an electrician to install a subpanel. The downside is you have to run extension cords everywhere you want power and you’re limited to how many things you can plug in at once (most generators have either two or four outlets). You also have to start and maintain the generator. When the power goes out, place the generator on a flat surface outside, at least 10 ft. from the house. Don’t set it under awnings, canopies or carports, or inside the house or garage. It’s absolutely critical that you keep the generator away from your house and especially away from doors and windows—your life could depend on it! More people die from carbon monoxide poisoning from the gas engines on generators than from the disasters causing the power outages. Option 2: Standby generators Standby generators automatically turn on when the power goes out—you don’t have to do a thing. This is the best option if you frequently lose electricity and want to keep all or most of your appliances running. Most standby generators are powerful enough to run a central air conditioner, kitchen appliances and other large items—simultaneously. They’re also quieter than portable generators and you don’t need to worry about running cords or storing gasoline. The drawback is the price. You’ll need to have the generator, transfer switch and subpanel professionally installed. A transfer switch constantly monitors power. If you lose electricity, it starts the generator automatically—even if you’re not home. When power is restored, the transfer switch shuts off the generator. Standby generators connect to your home’s fuel supply (natural gas or propane). If you don’t already have one of these fuel lines coming into the house, install a propane tank. Standby generators range from $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit to more than $15,000 for a 30,000-watt unit (installation included). Home centers carry a limited selection of portable generators (but usually no standby units). Larger sizes and standby units are usually available through special order or from the manufacturer. For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

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Below are the pros and cons of two types of emergency electrical generators—the portable type and the larger standby type—and tell you how to decide between them.

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* Portable. When the power goes out, you have to start up a gas-powered portable generator and plug it into your appliances or a subpanel. Portable generators cost $500 to $1,500 depending on power output. * Standby. These generators are powered by natural gas or propane and start automatically during power outages. Prices start at $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit, including installation. How to determine what size generator you need Add up your power needs Estimate your power needs before you shop for a generator. Look for a label on each appliance that you want to power during an electrical outage. Add up the watts to determine the generator size you need. You can also get an idea of wattage requirements here. Wattage Requirements * Microwave: 600 to 1,200 watts * Refrigerator: 700 to 1,200 watts * Freezer: 500 to 1,200 watts * Washing machine: 1,200 watts * 1/3-hp sump pump: 800 watts * Television: 300 watts * Laptop computer: 250 watts * 10,000-Btu air conditioner: 1,500 watts Your first step in adding backup power is deciding what you need (or want) to keep running when the electricity goes out. This determines the size (wattage) of the generator you’ll need. Walk through the house and make a list of everything you want to power during an outage. Look for a label on each appliance (they have to have one) that contains information such as wattage, model number and the year it was made (photo). Some labels are right inside the door on appliances; others are on the back, so you have to pull the appliance away from the wall. Write down the item and how much wattage it uses. Be sure to include essential items, like refrigerators, freezers, a well pump if you have one, and a sump pump if your basement could flood. You can go a few hours or even days without an oven (use the microwave instead) and an air conditioner—they use a lot of power and would require you to buy a much bigger generator. Add together the items’ wattages, then multiply that number by 1.5 (appliances need the extra power to start up). That’s the minimum wattage needed for your generator. For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

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Portable. When the power goes out, you have to start up a gas-powered portable generator and plug it into your appliances or a subpanel. Portable generators cost $500 to $1,500 depending on power output.

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When mariners gather for a discussion about all things boating, a topic that often comes up relates to generators. The generator discussion usually reveals some level of confusion among participants. Some are confused about how powerful their generators should be for their type of boating. Others have concerns about noise and fuel consumption, while still others are concerned about pollution. All of these concerns are legitimate. Like any other piece of boating equipment, the choice of size and type of generator depends on how it is to be used. If the plan is to take it to the beach to provide power for a sound system or to keep the drinks cold, any number of small, portable gasoline units weighing as little as 50 pounds are available. There are many well-built players in the marine generator market. Research—an indispensable boating skill—will help locate and price these units in any skipper’s local area. Many of these small units are as quiet as the inside of a library—about 60 decibels—and they are so light and small they can easily be carried on all but the smallest boats. Many small boats have them on board as a safety item to provide emergency battery charging, since almost all of them are capable of producing direct current (DC). If the generator is going to be used to power tools that are part of a vessel’s repair or maintenance system—such as a welding machine on a metal boat—the smaller portable units will generally not do the job. Any generator with an output of at least 5kW will be required if it is to be used as part of the repair and maintenance system of the boat, and it will not produce enough power to run all repair tools at the same time. However, it is perfectly adequate if the person doing the repairs is prepared to use one, or at the most, two power tools at the same time. A generator of 12.5kW will produce the same power as is usually found in a small land-based home or condo and will generally enable all normal and regular electrical equipment to be operated at once. Larger boats, particularly those equipped with multiple chillers for air conditioning, or electric stoves, ovens, and refrigeration, should be looking at generators capable of producing 15-20kW. In the past, smaller boats in the 25 to 30-foot range were simply not big enough to be able to carry the weight of an onboard built-in generator system. Similarly, gasoline-powered boats could not have onboard generators due to safety concerns because of gas fumes. However, in recent years a number of small diesel-powered generators have made their way onto the market. Some of them are referred to as “ignition proof” in that their operation will not trigger a gas fume explosion if installed in older gasoline-powered boats. They also have the advantage of being relatively lightweight. Many produce small output, diesel-powered generators in the 2.6 to 4kW range that are useful in even the smallest vessels. Not only do these smaller units provide power for 110V AC tools and equipment, they can keep batteries topped up through various available battery chargers. With the ever-increasing availability of lithium ion batteries that can be charged very rapidly without adverse effects, generators that produce three-phase power are coming onto the market. These units can produce enough power to charge (through a special charger) a set of lithium batteries in a faction of the time single-phase power can do the same job. Standard appliances don’t like three-phase power, however. A number of smaller generators offer a three-phase option. Another option most of the manufacturers are now making available is a generator with Direct Current (DC) output. These units produce battery-charging power for vessels using an inverter to produce AC current from an onboard battery bank. Any skipper who is considering adding a new generator to his boat should spend some time determining exactly what his electrical load is likely to be. All electrical appliances have the power requirements listed on the nameplate or electric motor. The power requirement will be listed in watts. When on full, electric heaters, refrigerators and freezers usually require 1,500 watts—to run them all at the same time will take 4.5kW. Don’t forget about a microwave, electric cooktop, water heater, and electronics. After all appliances and systems are examined and the skipper factors in how the electrical system will be used, the total power requirements will be determined and a decision on the type and size of generator can be made. For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

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When mariners gather for a discussion about all things boating, a topic that often comes up relates to generators. The generator discussion usually reveals some level of confusion among participants. Some are confused about how powerful their generators should be for their type of boating. Others have concerns about noise and fuel consumption, while still others are concerned about pollution. All of these concerns are legitimate.

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When choosing the best portable generators for boats you should take into consideration a number of things, including: the fuel type, portability, whisper-quiet operation, startup methods, fuel tank capacity, runtime at half load, and low-oil shutoff among other features. Before you explore the various capabilities of the best cruising portable generators, you want to lay out how you are going to use your portable generator onboard. 

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When choosing the best portable generators for boats you should take into consideration a number of things, including: the fuel type, portability, whisper-quiet operation, startup methods, fuel tank capacity, runtime at half load, and low-oil shutoff among other features. Before you explore the various capabilities of the best cruising portable generators, you want to lay out how you are going to use your portable generator onboard. Using Portable Generator Onboard These portable generators have the ability of providing genuinely practical power to make your boating experience a considerable step up from a wilderness camping experience. You do not have to heat up your entire cabin with a propane stove to make breakfast when you can use an electric toaster, frying pan, as well as coffee maker from home and run them with a portable generator. In addition, the best portable generators can help you to keep your food and beverages cool without having to make port every now and then to restock your ice supply. Features of the Best Portable Generators for Boats You Should Look For You should look for energy efficient portable generators that provide power for your cruising requirements. The best choices should consist of compact gas powered portable generators. The gen-sets should feature engine designs with exceptional specs, including: an effective engine displacement, and a convenient horsepower. Furthermore, the engine should conveniently be air-cooled OHV. The generator you select should be able to power a few of your appliances at once, such as a TV set, coffee maker, and a toaster. The best portable generators for cruising should have a convenient number of power receptacles. The best portable generators for boats need to provide relatively whisper-quiet operation, and the unit (s) should be lightweight as well as portable. The starting wattage and running wattage of the generator you settle for your boating activities need to be sufficient, and capable of meeting your power requirements, both at startup and continuous operation. The generator (s) needs to have long lasting frame, low-oil shutoff and overload protection. Low-oil shut down and overload protection will ensure that your generator engine is protected against frying up when it runs out of oil, and in the event that there is an overload. Additional Features to Consider It is necessary that you choose a portable generator that has a fuel gauge to help you monitor the fuel level at a glance. This will ensure that your lights never go off at night while cruising, since you will know when exactly to refuel. It is advisable to engage models that have multi-purpose control panel, including outlets for powering your boating activities. The outlets should be made of rubber outlet covers in addition to circuit breaker protection, along with quick reset buttons. Ultimately, generators for boats need to feature easy transportation as well as effortless startup. The fuel tank capacity needs to be sufficient enough, in order for the generator to operate for a considerable number of hours in a single fill. Conclusion Having one of the best portable generators onboard will not only guarantee you the availability of power, but also provide your family with the means of using low power appliances. In short, these portable generators are not going to allow you to turn your boat into a floating palace with icemakers and air conditioning, but they do provide a new dimension of comfort to voyaging in a small boat. For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham. Source: smarthomekeeping.com
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