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Schafer - A Belcan Company
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One Team. Your Vision. Your Mission.
One Team. Your Vision. Your Mission.

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Glass shield may protect water bears from dehydration

Unfazed by extreme heat, radiation, and being blasted into space, the pudgy microscopic predators known as tardigrades (pictured) are champion survivors. Now, researchers may have uncovered the trick behind one of their most impressive feats: their ability to survive droughts by drying up and then rehydrating years or maybe even decades later. Also known as water bears and moss piglets, tardigrades live in aquatic habitats all over the world, so this ability comes in handy when their liquid home evaporates. During the process, they essentially lose all the water in their body and cells. The creatures also start pumping out unique, amorphous proteins that form a glasslike material inside of their cells, researchers report today in Molecular Cell. The material may encase and shelter vital molecules, such as other proteins, until the dry spell is over. The scientists say we might be able to borrow the protective proteins to improve the drought tolerance of crops and to preserve vaccines so that they don’t need to remain frozen or refrigerated.
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Low levels of simple chemical associated with aging, DNA damage

Approximately ten thousand times each day, the DNA in our cells receives some damage, but most of that damage is repaired by our cells' built-in DNA repair systems. The efficiency of these DNA repair systems decline with age, however, and that's thought to lead to age-related health problems and cancer. A recent paper published in Science shows that a chemical used in the DNA repair process, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), has a concentration that declines with age. This decline may drive the age-associated accumulation of DNA damage—a finding that suggests supplementing NAD+ might offset some of the effects of aging.
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Fossils may be earliest known multicellular life: study

Fossils accidentally discovered in South Africa are probably the oldest fungi ever found by a margin of 1.2 billion years, rewriting the evolutionary story of these organisms which are neither flora nor fauna, researchers said Monday. If verified as both fungal and multicellular, the 2.4 billion-year-old microscopic creatures—whose slender filaments are bundled together like brooms—could also be the earliest known specimens of the branch of life to which humans belong, they reported in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. Up to now, the first fossil trace of eukaryotes—the "superkingdom" that includes plants, animals and fungi, but not bacteria—dates to only 1.9 billion years ago. Earth itself is about 4.6 billion years old. The ancient fungus-like life forms, found in fossilised gas bubbles 800 metres (2,600 feet) underground in South Africa's Northern Cape Province, are remarkable not just for their age but their origin, the researchers said.
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There Might Be Twice as Many Supermassive Black Holes in the Universe: https://youtu.be/NRYqB_Z2Lm4
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"This video shows a monster Black Hole swallowing an unlucky star, 2.7 billion light years away. The star approached all the way in to one-third of an astronomical unit, similar to the orbit of Mercury.
Visualization: NASA, S. Gezari ( John Hopkins University )"
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