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theo kuechel
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There has been a huge interest in medieval manuscripts and imagery in recent year. A great deal of it is shared for effect in a satirical or humorous way on social media. But if it raises awareness and increases interest in these cultural artefacts then that can only be a good thing. The images provide a great insight into history and the human condition

Open Marginalis http://openmarginalis.tumblr.com/ is a curated selection of digitized medieval manuscripts on Tumblr, curated by L. Kelly Fitzpatrick. accessible under open use terms. All examples are attributed together with an index of institutions featured on the blog.

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A rather cool twitter account focusing on the Typography of Berlin https://twitter.com/Berlin_Type

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Machine Learning comes to Typography!

FontJoy, http://fontjoy.com/# is a lovely site that automatically generates complementary font sets drawn from a database of 1800 fonts. You can set the parameters of similarity and difference and also control the results by 'locking' fonts that appeal. You can also change the background from dark to light.


I'd guess that the site will appeal to experienced and novice designers; and indeed anyone who likes playing with good design and typography.

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For me, Flickr (Creative Commons) images is one of my most important sources for pictures. At the moment I follow 197 individual photostreams, these13 provide a representative snapshot of the kind of images I find most valuable. Some are great examples of the photographer’s craft, others significant social documents, records, curated ephemera and rarely seen historical artefacts.


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Project Gutenberg has both volumes of Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes Gustav Doré online. Accessible in a number of formats both images and text are in the Public Domain. A great starting point for remixes.

Vol 1, https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5903
Vol 2, https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5946
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29/04/2017
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If you want to know more about a how society viewed the world then check out the children's' literature of the period. The Baldwin Library of Children's Historical Literature is a good place to start. According to the citations most of the items featured in this collection are in the Public Domain.

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As it's Easter weekend here's La Vie et la passion de Jesus Christ (Passion and Death of Christ) (1903 ); is believed to be the first feature film to have colorized sequences. Colorization was achieved using the Pathecolor/Pathechrome stencil-based film tinting process. Its fascinating use of colour and painterly sets provide some wonderful sequences for selecting extracts and remixing. Thanks to the Public Domain Review for finding this, and including links to the Internet Archive download.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the latest amongst the major museums making part of their collections Open Access. This updated policy enables anyone to access and use the high resolution images for “any purpose, including commercial and noncommercial use, free of charge and without requiring permission from the Museum.”

search the Met's Public Domain artworks here http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection#!?perPage=20&showOnly=openaccess&sortBy=Relevance&sortOrder=asc&offset=0&pageSize=0

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Work I developed with my colleagues from the University of Southern Maine on Visual Literacy in an educational context. (2015). http://www.meshguides.org/guides/node/214
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The J R James Archive on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/jrjamesarchive/ is a remarkable collection of images related to architecture and town planning.

Named after JR ‘Jimmy’ James Professor of Town and Regional Planning at the University of Sheffield, it covers a period from 1960s till the mid 1980s, this photographic archive is a superb record of daily life in the built environment of Britain.

Digitised from original 35 mm transparencies by graduates in the department, the archive hosts 3,782 photos, maps, plans and photographs. The images reveal; street scenes, brutalist architecture, dilapidated terraces and the tenements of post 60s Britain. These are contrasted with visionary drawings by town planners planners and architects. Throughout the images, children play, everyday people look happy getting on with their lives, but occasionally they appear to accept - perhaps subconsciously - they have no real agency in these spaces. All images CC BY NC

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