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Jason Wixson
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With Appalachian Chimney service you can rest at ease knowing your heating and venting systems are working properly and efficiently. We provide chimney and hearth solutions to all of Western North Carolina!
With Appalachian Chimney service you can rest at ease knowing your heating and venting systems are working properly and efficiently. We provide chimney and hearth solutions to all of Western North Carolina!

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As you snuggle in front of a cozy fireplace or bask in the warmth of your wood stove
 you are taking part in a ritual of comfort and enjoyment handed down through the centuries. The last thing you are likely to be thinking about is the condition of your chimney. However, if you don’t give some thought to it before you light those winter fires, your enjoyment may be very short-lived. Why? Dirty chimneys can cause chimney fires, which damage structures, destroy homes and injure or kill people.
Chimney fires can burn explosively
noisy and dramatic enough to be detected by neighbors or passersby. Flames or dense smoke may shoot from the top of the chimney. Homeowners report being startled by a low rumbling sound that reminds them of a freight train or a low flying air plane. However, those are only the chimney fires you know about. Slow-burning chimney fires don’t get enough air or have enough fuel to be as dramatic or visible. But, the temperatures they reach are very high and can cause as much damage to the chimney structure – and nearby combustible parts of the house – as their more spectacular cousins. With proper chimney system care, chimney fires are entirely preventable

Is There A Time Bomb In Your CHIMNEY
 
Fireplaces and wood-stoves are designed to safely contain wood fueled fires, while providing heat for a home. The chimneys that serve them have the job of expelling the by-products of combustion (substances given off when the wood burns). These substances include smoke, water vapor, gases, unburned wood particles, hydrocarbon volatiles, tar fog and assorted minerals. As these substances exit the fireplace, wood-stove, or furnace and flow up into the relatively cooler chimney, condensation occurs. The resulting residue that sticks to the inner walls of the chimney is called creosote.
The buildup of creosote in your fireplace, wood-stove, and chimney is unavoidable. A natural byproduct of the wood burning process, creosote forms a black/brown crusty, powdery, flaky, tar like, drippy and sticky or hard and shiny glazed coating on the inside of your chimney. It is not uncommon to see all forms of creosote in one flue system. What ever form it presents itself, creosote is highly combustible and a potential fire hazard: it’s the primary fuel in most chimney fires.
During a chimney fire, the outside surface of the chimney can become hot enough to ignite the surrounding walls, floor joists, rafters, insulation, or roofing materials. Suddenly, this can develop into an uncontrolled structure fire.
Even without a chimney fire, creosote and soot can reduce the draft and diminish the efficiency of your heating system.
Certain conditions encourage the buildup of creosote. Restricted air supply, unseasoned/wet wood and cooler than normal chimney temperatures are all factors that can accelerate the buildup of creosote on flue walls. Air supply on fireplaces may be restricted by closed glass doors or by failure to open the damper wide enough to move heated smoke up the chimney rapidly. [The longer the smoke lingers in the chimney, the more likely it is that creosote will build up in the flue]
Burning dry, seasoned, wood allows for higher burning temperatures. If the wood is not seasoned, energy is used to initially drive off the water trapped in the cells of the (unseasoned) logs, which also results in cooler smoke temperatures.
Burning hot fires with dry, seasoned, wood can ultimately help lower the amounts of creosote accumulation.
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