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Susam Pal
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When you look at things, how much do you see? Do you see them well enough to know the answers to the following questions without having to look them up?

(1) Is there a completely vertical edge in the mouse pointer (the little arrow) on your computer screen?

(2) When a friend of yours is away on Google Chat, what time does the away icon (the little orange disc or rectangle) seem to show?

(3) In which direction does your ceiling fan rotate when you are viewing it from the floor?

(4) In a rainbow, is the red bow the outermost bow or the innermost one, or does it vary with conditions?

(5) In a three-colour traffic light system in your city, which colour appears on the top or left?
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I like the rant in the last paragraph here: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/inline-functions.html#faq-9.9

NOTE: most people use the terms "declaration" and "definition" todifferentiate the above two places. For example, they might say, "Should Iput the inline keyword next to the declaration or the definition?"Unfortunately that usage is sloppy and somebody out there will eventually gigyou for it. The people who gig you are probably insecure, pathetic wannabeswho know they're not good enough to actually acomplish something with theirlives, nonetheless you might as well learn the correct terminology to avoidgetting gigged. Here it is: every definition is also a declaration. Thismeans using the two as if they are mutually exclusive would be like askingwhich is heavier, steel or metal? Almost everybody will know what you mean ifyou use "definition" as if it is the opposite of "declaration," and only theworst of the techie weenies will gig you for it, but at least you now know howto use the terms correctly.
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An awesome 9 minute documentary on the relative size of things in the universe and the effect of adding another zero. Released by IBM in 1977. Powers of Ten
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John Grint solved 'Splitting square into squares'.

Below, I'll prove that if the smallest positive difference between any pair of integers in the set of five integers is n then the sum of their squares is at least 10n^2. It follows from this that if the sum of their squares is 10n^2 then the maximum possible value of the smallest positive difference between any pair of integers in the set is n... http://cotpi.com/p/36/#36-1
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Migrated my blog posts from http://blog.susam.in/ running on blogger.com to http://susam.in/blog/ running on a self-written blogging application. New feed URL: http://susam.in/blog/rss/
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Used the C++ 'mutable' keyword for the first time. To modify a critical section object in a const member function. Related: http://www.highprogrammer.com/alan/rants/mutable.html
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