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Anas Eljamal
Works at Keyano College
Attends University of Liverpool
Lives in Fort McMurray, Alberta
198 followers|15,090 views
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DeWitt Clinton originally shared:
 
Taking insane to the next level.

Via Reddit.
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Anas Eljamal

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JK Rowling gave a commencement speech at Harvard about this specific top. I've listened to the entire speech, its very insightful.
<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/1711302?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="302" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/1711302">J.K. Rowling Speaks at Harvard Commencement</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/harvard">Harvard Magazine</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
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Anas Eljamal

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Tom Anderson originally shared:
 
In this video +Jeff Jarvis ruminates on the benefits of sharing & public-ness, and on the fears that makes people hold back because of the need for privacy.

Two months ago, I wouldn't have been too interested. But it's a fascinating subject if you think about it. In fact, I can't wait for his book on the topic, Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live to come out in September.

Prior to the Internet, how many people would have had the opportunity to easily talk to people all over the world? To find an audience at any hour, on any topic? Let alone, relatively inexpensively communicate with a mass audience?

I think implicitly we know the value of sharing and public-ness. That's why we go online and talk with strangers. That's why we share stuff on G+, Facebook and Twitter. But have you really given much thought to the benefits it provides you?

I left MySpace in early 2009. I've hardly been online since then. I posted a few things to Twitter or Facebook, but I was busy sitting on the beach, following my baseball team around the country (Go Giants!), snowboarding, reading, and watching all the TV shows & movies I'd missed in the 7 years I was working like a maniac on MySpace.

Most of my last two years I was with a small group of friends I've known all my life. Then recently I started to "share" in a very public way -- I signed up for Google+ and posted a thought or two about what was going on. Those thoughts got picked up by bloggers and tech news sites. Once my audience got bigger, I decided to start writing about other things -- things that were more important to me than "technology." Suddenly everybody and their mother was reaching out to me. I've been invited to do and participate in so many things in the last month, I could never keep up with it all.

You may think that this would only happen to me. "You're the MySpace guy!" But that's not true. That just accelerated it. Look at +Christina Trapolino who has 10,000 people following her. Just ask her what kind of benefits she's received by being public & sharing her thoughts.

Yesterday I visited my neighbor. He's a tech leader, someone very well known. He's started three or four huge company's and is a unique, interesting person. He and I had met before through work. But as neighbors, and as friends, we'd barely talked. Why? Well, mostly because we were being private. When we met through work years ago, we focused on work. You know what drew us together yesterday? Being public & sharing. It was my attitude that had changed. I'd started to reach out to the world in a way I hadn't before. Even though he lives right down the street, and we've been neighbors for years, we'd never hung out socially. By being public about what interested me, the two of us found out we actually have things in common.

Today another person I've talked to briefly through G+ is coming down to LA and I offered him a place to stay. It's like AirBNB except I'm not charging. :-) Now notice I haven't mentioned who these two fellows are. Maybe they don't want to be named. I haven't asked them. I'm respecting their privacy. Some things can be kept private, but when you're public about other things, wonderful things happen.

Making new friends isn't the only thing that being public & sharing can lead to. I think it can really help lead you to your life's work -- and I'm not talking about a job. I'm talking about what it is that you think you were meant to do with your limited time on this planet. Sharing your ideas tends to build a community around those ideas. And through community and interaction, you'll learn many ways of being and thinking. You won't just find opportunities opening up to engage in things that matter to you ; you'll simply learn about things you never new existed. Can you believe I'd never even heard of +Jeff Jarvis before G+? I'm embarrassed to admit it, but it's true. How deep was my head in the sand?

History has shown that the initial reaction to every new technology is fear. As Jeff mentions in the video, writers were initially fearful of putting their thoughts down on paper. I've read that people were scared of the telephone when it was first introduced. When MySpace was new, parents were terrified. Now most people realize the benefits of sites like Facebook, G+ and Twitter, it's generally accepted that the benefits of being online far outweigh the negatives. That said, in the press and in general, we still tend to focus on the negatives of being public, and the supreme value of privacy.

So here's to the positives of "living publicly" online. Try being a little more open about what you're doing, what you find interesting, and what you hope for the world. You never know where it may lead. My guess is, the more open you are, the more the world opens up for you.
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In his circles
269 people
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198 people
Dave Benoit's profile photo
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Philip Davis's profile photo
Robert Gregory Phillips's profile photo
Wadih Wafa's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Director of Learning Innovation
Employment
  • Keyano College
    Director, Learning Innovation, 2008 - present
  • Keyano College
    Chief Information Officer, 2004 - 2008
  • Higher Colleges of Technology
    Manager, Educational Technology, 2000 - 2004
  • Higher Colleges of Technology
    Manager, Students and Computer Services, 1992 - 2000
  • Higher Colleges of Technology
    Faculty, Business Information Systems, 1989 - 1992
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Fort McMurray, Alberta
Previously
Beirut, Lebanon - Manama, Bahrain - Damam, S.A - Dubai, U.A.E - Ottawa, Canada - Toronto, Canada - Alkhobar, S.A. - Al Jubail, S.A. - Edmonton, Alberta - Paris, France - Munich, Germany - Kualampur, Malaysia - Los Angeles, California
Story
Tagline
Challenge the obvious
Bragging rights
Married to Sana Elache, my son is Luay Eljamal, I was born in Beirut, Lebanon and live now in Fort McMurray, Alberta. My best years are my American University days. Worked in Dubai for 16 years and love discovering the world around me
Education
  • University of Liverpool
    EdD, Higher Education, 2011 - present
  • University of Wollongong
    MBA, Quality Management, 1996 - 1998
  • American University of Beirut
    Bachelor of Science, 1981 - 1985
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
September 25
Other names
Aboluay, Anas Jamal, Anas Al Jamal
An excellent Turkish restaurant with many Turkish meat dishes. No alcohol provided. Good services and welcoming employees.
Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
A moderate supermarket that has everything you need. Many clothing shops. It supermarket is quiet comprehensive. Has a good traditional restaurant. A must weekly destination for expats.
Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
Very nice atmosphere with Parisian flavour. Tried their hibiscus tea with many berries and ruins... It was very good. The food is more on the gourmet side... Delicious but small in quantity... Nice European cuisine though on the Asian side of Atyrau... Irony!
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
6 reviews
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A nice medium supermarket that has everything you need and you find most of what a Westerner might look for in a supermarket. Fresh food, meat, cans, soft and alcohol drinks. They dairy product has prominence with many types of yogurt (flavoured and plain), cheese and variety of milk. Accept cash and major visa cards. English is very little used by employees as well as on labels of products. Extremely convenient to the local residence and facing the newly established Polytechnic. Taxi parks outside it. It has multiple ATM machines at the entrance that accept international debit and credit cards. The second floor above the supermarket has a descent electronics shop that sell computers, laptops, and different gadgets with some kitchen ware.
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Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
I tried their mixed grill... It was good... The waitress speaks English which is a good change... Worth a visitation, at least once if you are on the Asian side of Atyrau...
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago