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Breen Ouellette
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www.breeno.net

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Glad that I only use SSDs.

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Food for thought.
I'm not exactly sure which category this goes in, but it's something very deep and worth your time to read: About listening to people, and believing them, and being believed.

Via +A.V. Flox.

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If you follow the media portrayal of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, then I urge you to watch the following testimony of the Sampare family. See the actual work of the commission for yourself. Link to Part 2 of the testimony is given below.

It was my honour to meet and assist in the testimony of siblings Roddy and Winnie Sampare, Roddy's wife Violet, their sister Anna (absent), and their family members present in support of their testimony.

Be advised that this is public record video, so there is no editing of the video. There are a few points which do not cut for transition.

Part 2: https://www.facebook.com/MMIWG/videos/vb.361462917552515/481571312208341/?type=2&theater

#mmiw #mmiwg

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Very interesting look at how the sense of taste varies from person to person.

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This week is becoming a banquet for thought.
Joan Didion on learning not to mistake self-righteousness for morality. “When we start deceiving ourselves into thinking not that we want something or need something … but that it is a moral imperative that we have it, then is when we join the fashionable madmen.” https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/12/05/joan-didion-on-morality/

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Food for thought.
A thoughtful piece by +Kai-Fu Lee​ about the effects of AI on work. As he rightly points out, the AIs we are building, and that we are likely to be able to build over the next several generations, are "narrow" AIs - ones which can do a specific task well, but have no comprehension beyond that. I'm more confident than he is that we'll make significant steps towards "general" AI in our lifetimes, but I agree with him that those won't be the things affecting our economy or world in the near future.

When it comes to the question of the jobs which will be (and are already being) displaced by these AIs, Lee wisely avoids either overly optimistic or pessimistic perspectives. But he spends the last part of the article making a compelling case for the increasing importance of a type of work which humans are particularly suited for: emotional labor.

He talks about this in several contexts, but a good example is a doctor delivering a serious diagnosis. While a computer may be able to diagnose more accurately than a human within our lifetimes, with things like this the delivery of the diagnosis, and the human interaction which accompanies and follows it, is supremely important.

Historically, emotional labor has been "invisible" labor, unrecognized, unpaid, and unappreciated. But our increasing recognition of it is happening at a time when our need for it is increasing, as well. It wouldn't surprise me to see this become a substantial economic sector in the future, just like the service, manufacturing, and agricultural sectors.

Some such jobs already exist, of course, from child care to therapy to sex work. And the flexibility of the Internet may offer new outlets for this: if you could pay someone to just listen to you for a while and not be a jerk, or get paid by someone for the same, would you?
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