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Ethan Siegel
Works at NASA's The Space Place
Attended University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Lived in Bronx, New York
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"The glorious result is a golden brown marshmallow, toasted on the outside, with a gooey, liquid sugar inside. Place them between two graham crackers with chocolate on one (or both) sides, and you’ve got yourself a S’more.

Or so you’ve been led to believe. You’re deluding yourself if you think this is how S’mores are raised... Because these conditions are truly appalling."

You'll never have another one after you realize the SHOCKING conditions in which they're raised!
After seeing these pictures, you’ll switch to raising your own.
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"Scientists talk about near perfect uniformity of the CMB. How do they know the measured differences in uniformity [aren’t] just due to the error in not making perfect corrections for the galaxies in the field of view of the measuring telescopes?"

If we want to make sure we’ve got an accurate map of what the Universe was born with, we have to take everything into account, including the effects of matter as it gravitationally grows and shrinks. As we do exactly this, we find ourselves discovering the causes behind the biggest anomalies in the sky, and it turns out that the standard cosmological model can explain it all.
How do we know that the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background aren’t polluted by everything Hubble reveals?
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"Leveraging our understanding of Einstein’s General Relativity, Hubble is using the cluster as a gravitational telescope, allowing us to see farther and fainter than ever before possible. We are looking far back in time to see galaxies as they were more than 13 billion years ago!"

When you think of the Hubble Space Telescope, perhaps you think of what’s touted as its most major feat of all: peering off into deep, dark space, collecting light, and discovering the plethora of distant galaxies laying billions of light years beyond our own, like the Hubble deep field, ultra deep field or extreme deep field. But thanks to a combination of factors, including gravitational lensing, Hubble has beaten its own record, finding the most distant galaxies of all.
At the ripe old age of 25, the Hubble Space Telescope is breaking new ground, peering deeper than ever before. How so? B…
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+Ethan Siegel​​, out of all of the wonderful images Hubble has given us, I agree with your choice.
When I first saw the HDF image, immediately I thought of Sagan's "The Great Demotions" chapter in Cosmos.

The first of them was when we understood that the Universe didn't revolve at our privileged feet, knocking us down a peg from our throne of "we are the reason all of this exists.
Incrementally we encountered more demotions as our understanding increased - but the images that resulted when we pointed the most capable, expensive telescope ever built at nothing, in my view was the final nail in the coffin of our privileged ego.
To stretch your intellect enough to even momentarily grasp what you are looking at is difficult.

I really wish Carl had lived to see them. His poetic slant on them would have been a jewel.


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"When you’re finally up at the moon looking back on earth, all those differences and nationalistic traits are pretty well going to blend, and you’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people."

We’ve come an incredible distance in exploring the Universe. In the span of just a single human lifetime, we’ve gone from speculations about what other worlds in our Solar System might be like, the possibility of planets around other stars and wondering how many galaxies might be in our observable Universe to actual answers about all three of these profound questions. But as far as we’ve come, Earth is still the only planet we know of with life on it, and the only one even capable of habituating us as our home. An inspiring plea from those who've left Earth as to why we should take care of it. 
The most important lessons about Earth come from looking outward.
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+David Andrews​​​​​​​​​​
Well, whatever, I still stick with the race I came about and I will still continue with the same race I was born with. And I don't really give a damn about racism. It total shit to me. What I care is that each race have their own women, so why mix? If kids from different race are healthier its because of the foods they eat and not necessarily a genetical alteration. If the white race each shit, they will be sick. If they are clean and eat proper food, they will be healthy and well. As I am a farmer's son, I ate the fat of the land since I was a kid and haven't fallen sick all these years. Since city people eat 35 to 50 percent of processed fat foods, artificial sweeteners and sugar rich drinks and booze quite a number of these have unhealthy kids or have problems within themselves. This is especially true if their kids are engouraged to eat sweets, ice creams and cakes that in later years they develop organ failures and diabetes. When they are in their late teens and early twenties they drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes and drugs, gobble down cocaine and shit, then they inject themselves and stay out late at nights. How do you expect these brainless weirdos to have healthy kids? I know many white people who have been deeply involved in the above and have married and got kids with mental defects and mutation (missing fingers, bent legs, joined twins, twisted faces and eyes, etc. These kids weren't born with faults but it's because of the drug addicted parents that the poor kids are suffering from this medical problem.

And this has nothing to do with racism, nothing to do with mixed breeding will brings healthier kids because I know several black drug addicts whose kids have also a number of health problems, such as miscarriages, deformed babies and later they find they're deaf or blind.

This is a case for you to do a reseach or ask doctors In hospitals whether this shitty druggy lifestyle is causing all these medical problem in children. Sometimes people who live in very old homes that still have rusty galvanized water pipes that are leaching lead into the water. Copper is also a culprit but not as bad as lead. Good luck with yourself if you think I am wrong. I couldn't careless.
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"While there’s a case to be made for accuracy, in some ways a color-hyped image is more accurate to what we perceive, even if it isn’t accurate to reality. By changing the contrast on these images, we can visually perceive details that would be washed out if we insisted on “true color” all the time."

The following tale of space images is true. And by true, I mean false. It's all lies. But they're entertaining lies. And in the end, isn't that the real truth? The answer is: No.

A great read courtesy of +Brian Koberlein!
Those Hubble photos you love? They lie. But those lies tell the true story of what exists in the cosmos.
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Reality isn't how we perceive it, so calling our vision true colour doesn't make any sense. Reality is made up of deep physical laws and structure that relates everything together. Surely anything that reveals the structure of reality, including these "fake" colour images , has to be more real than what our own senses can perceive? 
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“Even though there are no such thing as green stars, these galaxies are all giving rise to what looks like green plumes of smoke emanating from their cores.”

Since the first such object was discovered eight years ago, this was a hotly debated mystery, one that's been solved with an unlikely phenomenon: the same physics that underlies the aurorae here on Earth! Go get the whole story -- and all the images -- on this edition of Mostly Mute Monday!
What sort of greenery are these galaxies smoking?
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+Christian Grenfeldt You would appreciate this piece I wrote a little while ago about this research. http://www.forbes.com/sites/ethansiegel/2015/04/16/dark-matter-may-not-be-completely-dark-new-study-concludes/

It is much more nuanced than the Phys.org repeat of the press release.
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"But don’t be fooled: just because we don’t know absolutely everything with 100% certainty as respects a problem doesn’t mean we can’t give the best answer that our scientific knowledge has thus far. That answer might get better with time, it might change, and it might need revision, but it’s the best (and in many ways, the only) steps towards an actual answer we’ve ever taken."

From the Universe's first, pre-stellar light to voorwerps, false coloring, the nature of the Universe and quantum analogies, we've got a spectacular roundup at the end of our week!
“The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” -Marcel Proust As another fine week comes to a close at Starts With A Bang, let’s take a look back at all the topics we’ve taken on: Where did light first come from? (for Ask Ethan), Zooming into a fractal (for our Weekend Diversion),…
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This picture fits Human sceptism perfectly.
Humans are sceptical of things they don't see, even if something is there.
In that case, stars not shown in the photo. 
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"This latter image, consisting of a region of space barely a thousandth of a square degree on the sky – so small it would take thirty-two-million of them to fill the entire sky — contains a whopping 5,500 galaxies, the most distant of which have had their light traveling towards us for some 13 billion years, or more than 90% the present age of the Universe. Extrapolating this over the entire sky, we find that there are 170 billion galaxies in the observable Universe, and that’s just a lower limit."

Thanks for 25 years of awesome, Hubble, and for teaching us some amazing things about the Universe, including our best estimate ever of how many galaxies are in it!
VideoAs the Hubble Space Telescope celebrates its 25th anniversary, it's easy to take for granted all we've learned thanks to its incredible discoveries. But don't forget that when it was first launched, the spherical aberration in the primary mirror caused all the images it was returning to be blurry and [...]
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"[T]he strong force is what holds every atomic nucleus together; without it, we’d simply be a lifeless sea of fundamental particles, too repulsive to hold together in any meaningful fashion, and incapable of building any elements other than hydrogen in the entire Universe.

No stars would ever shine, no complex molecules would ever form, and there would never be a rocky planet anywhere in the Universe: just clumps of gas and great, empty voids."

If you've ever been confused by why protons inside atomic nuclei don't push each other apart, this clears everything up!
It’s what holds the nuclei in atoms together, overcoming electric repulsion. But how does it work?
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“It resonated with me, the suggestion that the person doing the experiment influences the outcome, that the outcome is influenced by what the experiment is indeed trying to prove. It seems to make more sense to me, that our view of the world directly influences and interferes with the world around us, as opposed to the suggestion or feeling that we are mere cogs in an unfeeling machine.”

Tears for Fears’ cofounder Roland Orzabal is a huge fan of quantum physics, and in particular of the idea of quantum indeterminism, to the point where he’s written and performed a number of songs touching on concepts like Schrödinger’s Cat and Einstein’s famous “God does not play dice” statement. Physicist Paul Halpern got an exclusive interview, with some incredible and insightful results about the intersection of science, music and the arts.
Tears for Fears’ Roland Orzabal wrote songs about quantum physics. Physicist Paul Halpern has a unique interview.
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I don't believe that Quantum indeterminism can explain creativity or free will in people. We're still far away from understanding human creativity, and the day we do is the day we'll create our first artificial intelligence. 
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"We can extrapolate back to still higher temperatures, to where matter and antimatter spontaneously create due to the incredible energies and Einstein’s E = mc^2. Even earlier, the electromagnetic and weak nuclear force unified, the Higgs symmetry was restored, and, presumably, we can extrapolate all the way back to a single point containing all the radiation, matter, antimatter, energy, and even spacetime in the entire Universe. In other words, we can extrapolate back to a singularity, or a point from which all of this originated."

The overwhelming scientific conclusion based on the observable evidence is that the Universe is expanding and cooling, having emerged from a hot, dense state in the past. We can extrapolate back to a time before neutral atoms existed, before even nuclei could form, and if we continue the extrapolation all the way back, we arrive at a singularity. Only, that last step isn't necessarily one we can take, and the insistence of many on its existence may be the biggest mistake ever made about the Big Bang.
The question of where all this came from, as in the entire Universe, has been one of the biggest philosophical mysteries that humanity's ever encountered. After millennia of wrestling with this question, the answer finally became accessible through scientific inquiry, culminating in the Big Bang. The idea was nothing short of spectacular. Back [...]
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" Love yours articles!, but there are to deep or to far for me. Maybe my son can understand those Math. Equation that you do. He's work as Engenieer in (Nuclear Propulsion).But I will keep reading your article I like to learn all things about the Universe!
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"We’ve managed to zoom in by more than a factor of 10^200, or more than a googol squared, and we still find this same self-similarity, and the same remarkable, intricate structures. There are ideas that perhaps the Universe is self-similar like this, but if it is, there’s a finite limit: the largest observable scales are “only” 92 billion light years or so (from one edge of the observable Universe to the other), while the smallest theoretical scale, the Planck scale, is down at around 10^-35 meters. All told, this is just 62 orders of magnitude, which doesn’t even account for the fact that non-gravitational forces begin to play important roles on scales the size of galaxies and smaller."

Mandelbrot zooms now surpass the scale of the entire observable Universe, and show no signs of loss of complexity or detail as they do. Lose yourself in these visuals, or celebrate 4/20 a little early, as is your wont.
Just open your eyes, full-screen it, and watch.
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+Bruce Elliott ok...I tell god about it lol...oh that is Us...I forgot ;))))
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Work
Occupation
Theoretical Astrophysicist / Writer / Educator
Employment
  • NASA's The Space Place
    Columnist, 2013 - present
  • Trap!t
    Head Editor: Science/Health, 2011 - present
  • Starts With A Bang!
    Science Writer, 2008 - present
  • Lewis & Clark College
    Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics, 2009 - 2011
  • University of Portland
    Professor/Lab Coordinator, 2008 - 2009
  • Steward Observatory/University of Arizona
    Postdoctoral Research Associate, 2007 - 2008
  • University of Wisconsin
    Faculty Assistant, 2006 - 2007
  • University of Florida
    Teaching/Research Assistant, Fellow, 2001 - 2006
  • King/Drew Medical Magnet High School
    Teacher, 2000 - 2001
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Bronx, New York - Yonkers, New York - Evanston, Illinois - Torrance, California - Gainesville, Florida - Madison, Wisconsin - Tucson, Arizona - Portland, Oregon - Houston, Texas - Rome, Italy
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Science writer, professor and theoretical astrophysicist
Introduction
Theoretical Astrophysicist, Science Writer and Communicator, expert in (some aspects of) dark matter and dark energy, physical cosmology, and sometimes professor, teacher and educator.

Creator and writer of Starts With A Bang!, the 2010 Physics Blog of the Year! Author of over 1,000 articles, featured in Esquire, the St. Petersburg Times, ESPN.com's Page 2, and many others.

Competitive beardsman and amateur acrobat / halloween-costumer extraordinaire.
Education
  • University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    Physics, 2001 - 2006
  • Northwestern University
    Physics, Classics, Integrated Science Program, 1996 - 2000
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