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David Fuller
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Aim lights down, see stars up. Simple, right?
Aim lights down, see stars up. Simple, right?

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The planet #Mercury  is remarkably easy to spot this week and into next, thanks to its proximity to brilliant #Venus. Check out how these planets move over the next week or so with this animated gif of their changing positions from now through Jan 22. http://eyesonthesky.com/Blog/tabid/80/EntryId/224/Find-Mercury-near-Venus-this-week-and-into-next.aspx
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Here's a written, detailed star hop to find Comet Lovejoy with binoculars or a magnified finderscope for the next 5 nights. There are two charts; one is a wider field showing where the comet is going and some of the brighter stars; the other is a more detailed view showing stars as typical binoculars would, with stars to 7.5 magnitude. Each day has a detailed written description for locating the comet.

It really is quite bright right now, and with the Moon out of the way, this is an ideal time to see it. It looks much like Messier 31 does with binoculars. Check it out here: http://eyesonthesky.com/Blog/tabid/80/EntryId/223/Find-Comet-Lovejoy-with-binoculars.aspx  #cometlovejoy
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A sailboat in they sky? Sure! NGC 225's stars form a sailboat-like shape among that open cluster in Cassiopeia. It is easy to find too - here's how: http://eyesonthesky.com/StarCharts/FirstLightGuides/ObjectGuidesList/NGC225.aspx #FirstLightGuides
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One of the first types of objects people have asked me about finding with a new telescope is a galaxy. Many are small, faint, and hard to see through light pollution. Not so with Messier 31, that is visible from almost anywhere. Here's how to find our own galaxy's next-nearest spiral neighbor in the night sky. #FirstLightGuides  http://eyesonthesky.com/StarCharts/FirstLightGuides/ObjectGuidesList/Messier31andMessier32.aspx
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I've been working on this kinda big project for a while. The first phase of it went "live" a few days ago - it is a set of guides to help observers of the night sky actually be able to find cool objects in the sky beyond just the Moon and planets. And they can do so with most any telescope, from most anywhere. Check it out here: www.firstlightguides.com #FirstLightGuides
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Dark sky advocacy doesn't mean, "Everyone has to live in the dark." It means better lighting, aimed where it's needed. We use less then. That saves money, eliminates glare which enhances safety, and keeps light out of your bedroom, so you can actually produce melatonin naturally and sleep better. What's not to like? Are YOU a dark sky advocate? Share with others if you agree. 

Aim light right, sleep better at night. 
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The supernova in M82 just discovered has created quite a bit of excitement around the astronomy community, because it is the closest one to occur to us since the 1800's (even though it is still 12 million light years away!). Want to find it? I'll have a finder chart for it if/when the magnitude increases enough to see it well. In the meantime, you can start looking for where to find M82 by watching this video from last year, that details how to find both it, and the nearby M81. Eyes on the Sky: April 1 thru April 7 And here's a handy finder chart too:   http://www.eyesonthesky.com/Portals/0/chartsweeklyvids/M81%20and%20M82%20finder%20chart.pdf
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