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Students 4 Best Evidence
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Cochrane UK runs occasional special series, sharing evidence and experience on a topic in multiple blogs and other material through social media channels. Sarah Chapman and Selena Ryan-Vig share tips on how to put together a successful series.
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"Meta-analyses and systematic reviews can highlight areas in which evidence is deficient, but they cannot overcome these deficiencies—they are statistical and scientific techniques, not magical ones" Garbage in = garbage out: via @NatureNews
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Decisions about whether or not to use a treatment should be informed by the balance
between the potential benefits and the potential harms, costs and other advantages
and disadvantages of the treatment.

This balance often depends on the baseline risk (i.e. the likelihood of an individual experiencing an undesirable event), or on the severity of the symptoms.

Read the last #KeyConcepts blog by Dennis Neuen here:
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Just because a treatment has been shown to lead to statistically significant improvements in symptoms does not necessarily mean that these improvements will be clinically significant (i.e. meaningful or relevant to patients). That’s for patients and clinicians to decide.
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Are the treatments practical in your setting? Be aware that treatments available to
you may be sufficiently different from those in the research studies that the results may not apply to you.

Read the new #KeyConcepts blog by Ed Walsh, based on an Informed Health Choices project.
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When you’re examining the results of a systematic review, it is important to look at the individuals it relates to. This is because treatments may have different effects in different individuals. A new #KeyConcepts blog by Bethan Copsey.
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Always consider the possibility that outcomes that are important to you may
not have been addressed in fair comparisons. Do not be misled by surrogate outcomes.
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This blog is a critical appraisal of the following randomized trial: The effect of physiotherapy on shoulder function in patients surgically treated for breast cancer: A randomized study. #QMUphysio2018 blog by Jade Tyerman.
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Systematic reviews sometimes conclude that there is “no evidence of a difference” when
there is uncertainty about the difference between two treatments. This is often
misinterpreted as meaning that there is “no difference” between the treatments
compared.

However, studies can never show that there is “no difference” (“no effect”).
They can only rule out, with specific degrees of confidence, differences of a specific size.

Read the latest #KeyConcepts blog by Bethan Copsey here.
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Do Physiotherapy programmes reduce fatigue in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care? #QMUphysio2018 critical appraisal blog by Eilidh MacRae.
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