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Kitsap Physical Therapy and Sports Clinics
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If stress is weighing you down, exercise may be the answer: Stress is everywhere in today’s world The world we live in today can seem like a breeding ground for stress. As a result, stress is an unavoidable part of life for a significant portion of the population. Recent statistics suggest that 70% of Americans experience some form of stress or anxiety every day, and most say that it interferes with their lives to at least a moderate degree. While daily stress generally comes and goes, about one in four individuals will go on to develop a mental health condition of some sort in their lifetime. Whether stress is an occasional inconvenience or an everyday impairment, most of us would probably agree that we could benefit from less in our lives. These days, there seems to be nearly as many apparent cures for stress as there are causes for it, and the effectiveness of each one varies significantly. But one of the most tried and true solutions to reduce stress is actually pretty simple: get more exercise. Exercise benefits the body and brain in a number of ways Getting regular aerobic exercise—which includes walking, running, and any other activity that increases your heart rate—will bring about a number of positive changes to your body, particularly to your metabolism and heart. It can also exhilarate and relax, and provide both stimulation and a calming effect by the same process. This calming effect is how exercise can manage stress and stress-related disorders like anxiety and depression as well. There are several explanations as to why exercise is responsible for these mental benefits, but it seems likely that the changes are related to both chemical and behavioral factors. On the chemical end, exercise has been found to reduce levels of the body’s stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. It also stimulates the production of endorphins, the body’s natural painkillers that are responsible for the “runner’s high” and feelings of relaxation many people experience after a hard workout. Behavioral factors have also been found to play a role in this process, as positive changes reinforce and encourage positive actions. What this means is that when you see improvements in your body—such as increased strength, better stamina, or a smaller waistline—it makes you feel better about yourself, which will all go on to reduce your stress levels as a result. Take your pick from the many exercise options available When done regularly, nearly any time of exercise will help bring about these positive physical and mental changes for you. Brisk walking and jogging are some of the most popular and easiest ways to get active and clear the mind, but others may prefer hiking, biking, swimming, yoga, high-intensity interval training, kayaking, or even rock climbing. It’s really up to you to find some type of exercise—or several—that work for you and do them on a regular basis. There is also a special sort of exercise known as autoregulation exercise that is specifically designed to replace the vicious cycle of stress with a cycle of relief. Several approaches may be used to accomplish this, such as deep breathing exercises, mental exercises like meditation, and progressive muscle relaxation, which focuses on loosening up tight and tense muscles throughout the body, one group at a time. A physical therapist can help get you on your best foot forward Current guidelines recommend getting about 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (like brisk walking) or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise (like jogging) every week. If you are just starting to integrate exercise into your life or increasing the amount you already do, it may take time to reach these marks, so a gradual approach is always best. Seeing a physical therapist can also help you get to where you want to be. Physical therapists are movement experts that work with patients on a personalized basis to help them move better and more frequently. So if you’re trying to increase your weekly exercise, a physical therapist can provide you with recommendations on what types you should attempt, or they may find a specific exercise program based on your abilities and goals to help you succeed. -Summarized from an article published in Harvard Health http://dlvr.it/Qtrp9Q
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Motivational Monday: -William Van Horne http://dlvr.it/Qtmdn5
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More than 1/3 of older adults with frailty are also depressed: Difficult to evaluate this connection with the evidence available Statistics suggest that about 10-20% of adults over the age of 65 are depressed. The number of older adults that are frail—which essentially means being weak and having a higher chance of getting injured—is also estimated to be similar. Both depression and frailty are associated with a number of negative effects in older age, such as a lower quality of life, increased use of health insurance and a higher chance of experiencing other health issues or dying. When both of these conditions are present at the same time, the effects can be even worse, with many of these individuals experiencing accelerated mental decline and disability. This shows why it’s important to understand the connection between depression and frailty, as it can help identify patients who are affected by either or both conditions, as well as to develop strategies to address them. Although there is some data available on this association, there are no large-scale studies that have focused on the two conditions exclusively. For this reason, a high-quality pair of studies called a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine how many older adults with frailty also have depression and vice versa. Three major databases searched for relevant studies To conduct the review, researchers performed a search of three major medical databases for studies that investigated depression and frailty in adults with an average age of 60 years and older. To be included, studies also had to utilize respectable criteria for defining both depression and frailty, and had to include a control group of patients who did not have these conditions for comparison purposes. This search led to 63 studies being screened and 24 of these meeting the necessary criteria for inclusion into the review. Once collected, the findings from these 24 studies were evaluated and compared to one another to determine how common frailty and depression were in older adults. Exercise can be helpful for treating both frailty and depression Results showed that there were 8,023 older adults that had frailty, and of these, 38.6% were also depressed. Similarly, 2,167 older adults were found to have depression, and 40.4% of them were also frail. Further analysis from five studies showed that when patients with depression were compared to individuals without depression, there was a significantly higher risk of also having frailty. Finally, the overall quality of the included studies was found to be good, which shows that these findings can be considered reliable. Taken together, this systematic review and meta-analysis show that a significant portion of older adults who are frail are also depressed, and vice versa. While this finding is alarming, the good news is this: treatment that targets either of these conditions can actually lead to improvements in both of them at the same time. Exercise, in particular, is an effective tool to manage both depression and frailty, as it leads to positive changes in both mental and physical health. This is one of the primary reasons physical therapy is highly recommended for older adults with any type of impairment, since it is based on helping individuals move better and more frequently. With this in mind, elderly individuals who are frail or depressed—or both—are strongly encouraged to seek out the services of a physical therapist. Doing so can result in lasting changes in both their physical and mental health, and in turn, improve their overall quality of life. -As reported in the July ’17 issue of Ageing Research Reviews http://dlvr.it/QtLkld
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Enjoy your ski vacation by follow these safety tips. #SeeAPT1st: Enjoy your ski vacation by follow these tips to stay away from unnecessary injuries. #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/Qt2tbz
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Exercise found to decrease anxiety and other stress-related disorders: Updated analysis needed in light of new studies and flaws in prior research Anxiety disorders are a group of mental health conditions that include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and phobias. Together with stress-related issues like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), these conditions have all been found to have negative impact on patients’ lives, such as a reduced quality of life and increased risk for heart disease and early death. Targeted medications and a psychiatric intervention called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are typically recommended as the primary treatments for patients with anxiety and stress disorders, but the outcomes are not always positive. About one-third of patients do not respond to medications or CBT, and these interventions are not available in certain parts of the world. Exercise is considered an alternative for the patients that are either unable or unwilling to try medications or CBT, but there has only been one high-quality study (meta-analysis) on the topic. At the time, this study concluded that there was not enough information to recommend exercise for anxiety disorders. Since then, however, additional research has been published, and researchers have pointed out certain flaws in the original meta-analysis. For this reason, an updated meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of exercise on symptoms in patients with anxiety or stress disorders. Seven databases searched for relevant studies The investigators performed a search of seven major medical databases for randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effectiveness of exercise in adults with an anxiety or stress-related disorder. RCTs evaluate specific interventions by randomly assigning patients to different groups, and they are considered the gold standard for determining if a treatment is beneficial. This search led to 62 studies being screened, and six RCTs fit the necessary criteria to be included in the meta-analysis. Once collected, the findings of these six RCTs were evaluated and compared to one another to assess the impact of exercise on patients. Based on positive results, exercise should be considered a treatment option for anxiety The six included RCTs contained data on 262 participants, with 132 undergoing an exercise treatment program and the other 130 serving as the control group, who did not undergo exercise and were used for comparison. Results showed that exercise significantly reduced symptoms of anxiety in these patients, who had a variety of disorders that included PTSD, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or social phobia. When compared to the control group, the effect size of exercise was found to be in the medium range. Physical therapists can help promote exercise in patients with anxiety These findings support the use of exercise for patients with anxiety or stress disorder, and the researchers suggested that it should therefore be considered a viable option for these patients. Physical therapists are movement specialists that promote and prescribe exercise for a wide variety of conditions. While they are often viewed as professionals that only treat physical problems, this study shows why they can also be utilized to help overcome mental health issues like anxiety. Patients with anxiety or stress-related disorders are therefore encouraged to seek out the services of a physical therapist for an exercise therapy program that can help them better manage their symptoms while also improving their health and fitness in the process. -As reported in the March ’17 issue of Psychiatry Research http://dlvr.it/QssT5B
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Motivational Monday: -Evan Esar http://dlvr.it/QshmJg
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Happy Hanukkah! http://dlvr.it/Qsd3r7
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Recipe Wednesday - Beef Steak With Carrots and Mint: Want to put an interesting spin on your usual steak? Click here for this totally interesting recipe! http://dlvr.it/QsHmms
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Older adults with knee arthritis benefit from a home-exercise program: Better treatments are needed to target this at-risk population Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a condition in which cartilage that normally protects the ends of bones in the knee joint gradually wears away over time, which leads to pain and disability. It is particularly common in older individuals and makes it challenging for them to perform many basic everyday tasks. This is why effective treatments and prevention methods are needed to target these patients and help them manage their condition, but there are currently no established interventions in place to accomplish this. Exercise therapy that focuses on improving the strength and flexibility of various muscles is one treatment that has been proven to be effective for knee OA patients, and it can be administered either at a physical therapy clinic or as part of a home-exercise program. Home-exercise programs are inexpensive and do not require special equipment, but some patients may have difficulty following exercises when not guided by a physical therapist. With this in mind, researchers decided to conduct a powerful study called a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) to determine how effective a home-exercise program was for older adults with knee OA and how closely they adhered to this program. Patients are randomly assigned to one of two groups Older adults with a history of knee pain in one or both knees were recruited for the study and screened to determine if they were eligible. This led to 52 individuals with knee OA being accepted and then randomly assigned to either the multiple exercise group or control group. All participants were taught a home-exercise program by a physical therapist and provided with an instructional booklet to help them better understand its components. Participants in the exercise group were instructed to perform three out of 10 possible exercises, all of which were strengthening or stretching exercises for muscles surrounding the thighs or hips. The specific exercises that were found to be appropriate for each patient in this group were based on an interview conducted by the physical therapist at the start of the trial. Participants in the control group were instructed to only follow one exercise, which was a chair-sitting strengthening exercise for the quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh. All participants were instructed to perform three sets of 10 repetitions of each assigned exercise, five times per week for four weeks, and they were assessed before and after this intervention for various outcomes related to knee pain and function. Home-exercise program leads to superior results, with most patients adhering to it Results showed that participants in the home-exercise group experienced significant improvements in knee pain, stiffness and strength compared to the control group. Exercise group participants also reported superior scores in their ability to complete daily physical activities, social activities and general health conditions. In addition, it was found that 96.6% of participants in the home-exercise group and 100% of control group participants adhered to their assigned programs. Taken together, these findings suggest that a home-exercise program consisting of strengthening and stretching exercises for various hip and thigh muscles can lead to a number of benefits for older adults with knee OA. The individualized nature of these programs—since they selected exercises based on each patient’s abilities—may have also had a positive impact on these results and improved patients’ adherence. Based on these results, patients with knee OA are urged to see a physical therapist, who can provide either a home-based or supervised exercise program depending on which is more suitable for them. Visiting a physical therapy clinic this time of year is a particularly good idea for those who have already met their insurance deductible or out-of-pocket maximum for 2018, as their visits may be covered for the rest of the year. -As reported in the August ’18 issue of Clinical Rheumatology http://dlvr.it/QsC9g0
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Hockey is hazardous, but risks can be avoided. SeeAPT1st: Hockey is hazardous, but risks can be reduced by following these simple steps. #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/QrwHsl
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