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Viktor Schmidt (viktorianer)
Berlin
Berlin
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Die Jupiter Opposition war für mich bis jetzt nicht so erfolgreich :( Zwar gab es einige klare Nächte, aber kaum eine Nacht mit einem guten Seeing.

https://astro-viktorianer.blogspot.com/2018/05/der-jupiter-in-der-opposition-und-die.html

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Oh my Gourd Nebula (Sharpless 2-308)

Excuse me for the catchy name, I was so excited when i captured the first OIII frame I yelled OMG, and the penny dropped; I thought Oh my Gourd, so I decided to stick to this...

I started imaging this object in Feb 2017; all from home spent endless hours mostly frustrated with bad weather. I really wanted to get more Ha frames to enhance the red nebulosity but weather just wont allow me...and the object is becoming too low to image. Very pleased with the result, still I might continue imaging next year. Hope you like it
Capture details and high res image: https://astrob.in/334480/0
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Jupiter in Infrared from Hubble
Image Credit: +NASA, +European Space Agency, ESA, Hubble; Data: Michael Wong (UC Berkeley) et al.; Processing & License: Judy Schmidt
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180221.html

Jupiter looks a bit different in infrared light. To better understand Jupiter's cloud motions and to help NASA's robotic Juno spacecraft understand the Hubble Space Telescope is being directed to regularly image the entire Jovian giant. The colors of Jupiter being monitored go beyond the normal human visual range to include both ultraviolet and infrared light. Featured here in 2016, three bands of near-infrared light have been digitally reassigned into a mapped color image. Jupiter appears different in infrared partly because the amount of sunlight reflected back is distinct, giving differing cloud heights and latitudes discrepant brightnesess. Nevertheless, many familiar features on Jupiter remain, including the light zones and dark belts that circle the planet near the equator, the Great Red Spot on the lower left, and the string-of-pearls storm systems south of the Great Red Spot. The poles glow because high altitute haze there is energized by charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere. Juno has now completed 10 of 12 planned science orbits of Jupiter and continues to record data that are helping humanity to understand not only Jupiter's weather but what lies beneath Jupiter's thick clouds.
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Twinkle, twinkle, many stars! Several stars and distant galaxies are visible in this Hubble Space Telescope view of a galaxy cluster. The light from this cluster took more than 5 billion years to reach us, while the light of the more distant galaxies seen had to travel even longer than that, making this image an extremely old window into the far reaches of the universe. Take a closer look: http://go.nasa.gov/2C4KCxS
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🔵Hubble Sees Shrinking
Dark Spot on Neptune.

Neptune’s Dark Storms were first discovered in the 1980s by NASA’s Voyager 2 Spacecraft. Since then, only Hubble has had the sharpness in Blue Light to track these elusive features that have played a game of Peek-a-Boo over the years. Hubble found 2 Dark Storms that appeared in the Mid-1990s & then vanished. This latest Storm was first seen in 2015, ut is now shrinking.
Like Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (GRS), the Storm swirls in an Anti-Cyclonic direction & is dredging up Material from deep inside the Ice Giant Planet’s atmosphere. The elusive feature gives Astronomers a Unique opportunity to study Neptune’s deep winds, which can’t be directly measured. The Dark Spot Material may be Hydrogen Sulfide. “The Particles themselves are Still Highly Reflective; they are just slightly darker than the particles in the surrounding atmosphere,” said Dr. Joshua Tollefson, from the University of California, Berkeley.
Unlike Jupiter’s GRS, which has been visible for at least 200 years, Neptune’s Dark Vortices only last a few years. This is the first one that Actually has been photographed as it is dying. The Dark Vortex is behaving differently from what Planet-Watchers predicted.
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One small flare was seen by our solar-observing mission as it came from the Sun's only visible active region over the week around Feb. 7. The flare sputtered and spurted to eventually unleash this brief, bright flash. Learn more: http://go.nasa.gov/2BvlP53

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Last nights I spent some time in Gemini constellation to catch Eskimo Nebula. I did not expect its shape actually resembles head in parka so much :) Image below is composite of RGB data and narrowband images. Total exposure time is about 90 minutes. It was made at my backyard with Meade ACF 10" telescope and QHY163M camera on EQ6 mount. Thanks for viewing!
http://astrojolo.com/astrophotography/other-nebulae/eskimo-nebula/
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Heute etwas gefroren und wenig geschlafen! Ceres, Jupiter und Mars angeschaut und die beiden letzten versucht aufzunehmen. War schwierig...

https://astro-viktorianer.blogspot.de/2018/02/ceres-in-der-opposition.html
Ceres in der Opposition
Ceres in der Opposition
astro-viktorianer.blogspot.be

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Pferdekopfnebel mit NGC 2023 und NGC 2024
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