Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Brian Flanagan
119 followers -
Freelance writer & scientist
Freelance writer & scientist

119 followers
About
Brian's posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Here's a stunner: 

Nobelist in physics echoing my ideas. 

http://bit.ly/1U2cotM
___________________


I don't think he's ripping me off; his ideas are fairly rudimentary at this point, though remarkably parallel.

My question: How do I keep him from stealing my thunder when he has the big name?

My work on this business was first published decades ago and I've been leveraging the web to the hilt, educating people on the issues and arguing for my POV. So I have a wholly legitimate claim to precedence.

Post has attachment
Here's a stunner: 

Nobel laureate in physics echoing my ideas. 

http://bit.ly/1U2cotM
___________________

I don't think he's ripping me off; his ideas are fairly rudimentary at this point, though remarkably parallel.

My question: How do I keep him from stealing my thunder when he has the big name?

My work on this business was first published decades ago and I've been leveraging the web to the hilt, educating people on the issues and arguing for my POV. So I have a wholly legitimate claim to precedence.

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Here's an old story you all know.
_____________________________

It is late, and I am sitting alone by the window, watching the snow fall on a midnight shift at the Children's Home. The kids are all in bed and sleeping. The other night I dreamed I taught one of them how to hold fire in his hand.

Winter and darkness bring solitude, strange thoughts. The psalmist writes that night with night shares its knowledge. Above the obscuring clouds and the drifting snow the stars might appear to turn in hand with wandering travelers of long ago. At night we still wonder, what can it mean? What signify, the half-heard music above the hillside? To what destination might the lights make their way in the sky?

Winter's darkness has fallen again. The earth on its axis is turned. In the fastness of night we remember the magi, imagine them murmuring to themselves while they poke about in their dens, kneeling at the hearth-side, stirring the embers and smiling in memory of another time when, on a foreign plain and in the company of shepherds, expending much enchantment, they drew themselves together before the child. The obscurities of prophecy had been made plain then in the skies breathing auroras over them, the air beat with wings on fire. And the stillness of it, the unearthly calm that had given voice to the question, so that we said aloud to one another, what have we done? What are we that we should be taken notice of so?

Snow is falling, fluttering on the air, a bright nimbus falling through darkness and silence to layer down over trees, fields, houses and lawns, framing halos for street lights, the choir on the church porch singing holy, holy, holy, lifting up the night in a drifting veil of white...

From "Journey of the Magicians"

http://wordassociation1.net/journey.htm

Photo

Post has attachment
Would some kind soul please advise me?

I've just now been invited to a program on robotics in re: the 'Digital Initiative' at the Harvard Business School.

Owing to disability and a monkish temperament, I'm unable to afford the trip on my own. 

My question: What editors might be interested in these goings-on?

Off the top of my head, the trade journals in IT seem a safe bet. My own scientific work directly relates to quantum computation, so places like 'Wired' seem an obvious way to go.

Any other ideas? I've been writing a long time, but most of my serious stuff is for specialists.

Here are a few forays in pop sci on LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/1l6HAws

Thanks for any (polite) suggestions.

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Astronomers have long wondered whether the highly-structured orbital trend displayed in our solar system was simply the norm, or the result of an amazing coincidence. A new study that examined the orbits of 74 exoplanets orbiting 28 distant stars appears to put the question to rest.

The team created model orbits for the exoplanets by observing the characteristics of specially selected parent stars with predetermined characteristics. By having a knowledge of the mass and radius of a host star, the researchers could extrapolate the speed at which a potential Earth-like planet would travel around it, assuming that its orbit was circular.

The team then used NASA's Kepler space telescope to determine the actual orbital periods of the exoplanets. Subsequent observations found that all 74 of the exoplanets matched up well with the predicted models, meaning that the orbits were essentially circular.

http://t.co/QeIR7gtQfH

Post has attachment
Really, an author’s lot has gradually deteriorated to be the most wretched state of all. An author ordinarily must present himself … hat in hand, bowing and cringing, recommending himself with fine letters of introduction. How stupid: one who writes must understand that about which he writes better than he who reads; otherwise he would not write.

Or one must manage to become a shrewd little pocket-lawyer proficient at gulling the public. — That I will not do, no I won’t; no I won’t — no, the Devil take the whole caboodle. I write the way I want to, and that’s the way it’s going to be; the rest can do what they like, they can stop buying, stop reading, stop reviewing, etc.

http://bit.ly/1APwRYE

Post has attachment
In the first decades of the 20th century, physicists hotly debated how to make sense of the strange phenomena of quantum mechanics, such as the tendency of subatomic particles to behave like both particles and waves. One early theory, called pilot-wave theory, proposed that moving particles are borne along on some type of quantum wave, like driftwood on the tide. But this theory ultimately gave way to the so-called Copenhagen interpretation, which gets rid of the carrier wave, but with it the intuitive notion that a moving particle follows a definite path through space.

Recently, Yves Couder, a physicist at Université Paris Diderot, has conducted a series of experiments in which millimeter-scale fluid droplets, bouncing up and down on a vibrated fluid bath, are guided by the waves that they themselves produce. In many respects, the droplets behave like quantum particles, and in a recent commentary in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, John Bush, an applied mathematician at MIT who specializes in fluid dynamics, suggests that experiments like Couder’s may ultimately shed light on some of the peculiarities of quantum mechanics.

http://bit.ly/1JNOr7s
Wait while more posts are being loaded